Hot answers tagged

58

As you've already noticed, Red Hat's description is vague about what each suite actually includes. Below is a list of the package groups the each suite will install. You can get more information about what package group by running yum groupinfo foo-bar. The names listed below differ from what yum grouplist will list but the groupinfo cobase, ...


52

tune2fs -l /dev/sda1 **OR** /dev/sdb1* | grep 'Filesystem created:' This will tell you when the file system was created. * = In the first column of df / you can find the exact partition to use.


31

Yes! This is a big deal, and incredibly common. And there are two basic approaches. One way is simply with scripted installs, as for example used in Fedora, RHEL, or CentOS's kickstart. Check this out in the Fedora install guide: Kickstart Installations. For your simple case, this may be sufficient. (Take this as an example; there are similar systems for ...


30

This is a holdover from "ye olde tymes" when machines had trouble addressing large hard drives. The idea behind the /boot partition was to make the partition always accessible to any machine that the drive was plugged into. If the machine could get to the start of the drive (lower cylinder numbers) then it could bootstrap the system; from there the linux ...


28

One reason for having a /boot partition is that it allows for things like encrypted /, where the kernel and initrd are loaded from an unencrypted partition and then used to mount the encrypted root partition containing the operating system. It shouldn't matter for general usage however.


18

In Larry Wall's original Perl v1.0 posting to the comp.sources.misc newsgroup on December 18, 1987, he said: If you have a problem that would ordinarily use sed or awk or sh, but it exceeds their capabilities or must run a little faster, and you don't want to write the silly thing in C, then perl may be for you. In a much later ...


18

Is this not how to set up a swap file? I think you missed a step in between chmod and swapon: mkswap /mnt/sda2/swapfile As for the oxymoromic error... swapon: /mnt/sda2/swapfile: read swap header failed: Success What this literally means is there's a bug in the swapon code, but not necessarily one related to its primary functioning. C library ...


17

The Debian CD set contains all of the packages in the main repository. Most of this software can easily be downloaded later. According to the Debian wiki: Although there are over 30 CDs (or 5 DVDs) in a full set, only the first CD is required to install Debian. The additional CDs are optional and include extra packages, that can be downloaded ...


17

There are two approaches you can use. For either approach, you need first mount your hard disk partition wherever (for example, under /hd) and also add it to /etc/fstab, then create home, var, and tmp inside the mount. Use symlinks. Then create symlinks from /home to /hd/home, etc. Instead of symlinks, use bind mounts. Syntax is mount --bind /hd/home ...


16

The answer is/isn't sexy, depending on your point of view. Perl is very useful. Lots of the system utilities are written in or depend on perl. Most systems won't operate properly if Perl is uninstalled. A few years ago FreeBSD went through a lot of effort to remove Perl as a dependency for the base system. It wasn't an easy task.


14

Linux adds the hypervisor flag to /proc/cpuinfo if the kernel detects running on some sort of a hypervisor.


14

/dev/sda2 is an extended partition. /dev/sda5 is an logical partition which is placed inside the extended partition. Originally there could be only 4 partitions on a hard disk. To circumvent this, the extended partition was invented and further partitions, so called logical partitions, could be created inside the extended partition. The partitions 1-4 are ...


13

Check the date of the root filesystem with dumpe2fs. I can't really think of how that could be anything other than the date you're looking for: dumpe2fs $(mount | grep 'on \/ ' | awk '{print $1}') | grep 'Filesystem created:'


13

Following method works with CentOS 6.2: Requirements: USB flash drive (at least 4 GB, I used a 16 GB one) Download an ISO image from a mirror - I chose the full 1st DVD image to avoid a network install (because it is not clear if the cryptographic package signatures are checked by the installer or not), e.g.: $ wget ...


13

There's a FAQ on Debian CDs, which also includes this: Which of the numerous images should I download? Do I need all of them? No. First, of course you only need to download either CD or DVD images - the two types of images contain the same packages. Also, you only need the CD/DVD images for your computer's architecture. [...] Furthermore, ...


13

Quite simple. 8GB of disk isn't enough for this version of Kali Linux. Use VBoxManage to resize the virtual disk, and GParted to expand the filesystem.


12

The main reason for the major enterprisey distro's like Red Hat and I think Suse to use a separate /boot is that they use LVM by default and Grub cannot be used to boot from LVM. It is that simple. So if you want to use LVM, and that is a boon, you use a separate /boot. Personally, I think it is good practice to use both LVM and separate partitions for a ...


12

A CD-ROM and USB stick use entirely different methods to boot. For an ISO9660 image on a CD-ROM, it's the El Torito Specification that makes it bootable; for a USB stick, it needs a Master Boot Record style boot sector. ISOLINUX, the bootloader that is used in ISO9660 CD-ROM images to boot Linux, has recently added a "isohybrid" hybrid mode that uses some ...


12

Download the netinstall iso, boot it and select non-graphical install. I actually made a video once for it: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JOGSupJury4 The difference between ubuntu and debian is the way they are doing package testing. Debian is all about stability and ubuntu is more about all the new things (less stability).


12

You have to Convert the ISO to UDRW format using: hdiutil convert -format UDRW -o destination_file.img source_file.iso for Further steps and reference click this link, go with the steps: Create bootable USB stick from ISO in Mac OS X


11

Many distributions have some facility for a minimal install; essentially where you manually select only those packages that you explicitly wish to install. Debian has this ability and would be a better choice, in your situation, than the other obvious minimal contender, Arch Linux. Arch's rolling release status may provide a level of ongoing complexity ...


11

I think I found the answer: blkid From the man page: The blkid program is the command-line interface to working with the libblkid(3) library. It can determine the type of content (e.g. filesystem or swap) that a block device holds, and also attributes (tokens, NAME=value pairs) from the content metadata (e.g. LABEL or UUID ...


11

tune2fs You can use the command tune2fs to find out when the filesystem was created. $ tune2fs -l /dev/main/partition |grep 'Filesystem created' Example $ sudo tune2fs -l /dev/dm-1 |grep 'Filesystem created' Filesystem created: Sat Dec 7 20:42:03 2013 which disk to use? If you don't have /dev/dm-1 you can use the command blkid to determine ...


10

As of Debian 6.0 (Squeeze), the netinstall and disc 1 of the regular install CD/DVDs are 'hybrid' ISOs. They can be burned to an optical disc and booted or copied onto a USB drive and booted. To copy the ISO onto a USB drive from a linux system all you need to do is cat the ISO onto the drive. cat debian.iso > /dev/sdX ...


10

There are a few dates lying around. All files have dates. Log files have dates in them. On Debian or Ubuntu and their derivatives, see /var/log/installer/syslog for the definitive answer if it exists it is part of the log of the instillation. But beware this is not guaranteed. (see other answers/comments for some of the reasons it may not work.)


10

I think you must make bootable usb using dd command (if your iso is in home directory): First unmount (not eject) the usb: sudo umount /dev/sdb1 Then, write the image to the disk: sudo dd bs=4M if=CentOS-7.0-1406-x86_64-Everything.iso of=/dev/sdb Then it will not show /dev/root does not exist.


9

How about downloading the CD1 ISO, then put it on a USB and boot? (My favourite) How about using an automated tool such as UNetbootin? Here is another tool from Pendrivelinux.


9

AIF, the Arch Installer Framework, has been removed from the new ISOs. There will be a formal announcement in the next couple of days. For the moment, you can read the details on the mailing list. You can now use the Arch Install Scripts as described on the wiki. There is also this thread on the Arch boards which has some more detail about the reasons ...


9

with the required skill and especially knowledge about the installed linux it is not worth while anymore to replace it. and whatever you do, you probably never want to replace the already installed kernel. however, you can have your arch linux relatively easy and fool proof! the concept: you install arch linux into some directory on your NAS and chroot (man ...


9

I found the answer. Put Arch DVD or Flash Drive and boot it again. Retry following commands : mount /dev/sda1 /mnt #sda1 is `boot` partition mount /dev/sda3 /mnt/home #sda3 is `home` partition arch-chroot /mnt pacman -S os-prober grub-install /dev/sda grub-mkconfig -o /boot/grub/grub.cfg exit reboot Cheers...



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