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4

It depends on which boot-loader was installed. If its a standard Debian install it should be GRUB2. Boot the computer with all disks containing bootable installations attached and powered. you need to open Root Terminal application to open a terminal as root. then enter this commands. apt-get update apt-get install os-prober if os-prober package is ...


3

To get the smallest possible system, follow the instructions you linked to, but specify --variant=minbase on the debootstrap command line. This will install only apt, essential packages and their dependencies. You will always end up with packages not flagged as "Essential": some of the dependencies of essential packages aren't themselves "Essential" (they ...


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I can now happily confirm that accessing the built-in flash drive works without problems using kernel 4.6.0-rc7 and manually binding the device using: echo 106b 2003 > /sys/bus/pci/drivers/nvme/new_id I'll submit a patch which will make the manual binding superfluous. During testing I had one episode of spurious timeouts which I was never able to ...


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You could: start the computer with both disks attached, boot into (your currently only choice) Debian run update-grub It should detect Windows on the first Disk, and add an entry to the boot-loader choices. And you could then optionally install grub also to the other disk boot sector by running grub-install /dev/sdb sdb is what I assume to be the ...


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I believe the Fn keys are mapped to X86... named keys. Therefore, I'm assuming you have to install the x-server first. As for the brightness issue, ArchWiki has some relevant information, among which is the possible systemd-backlight problem/workaround: Inverted Brightness (Intel i915 only) Symptoms: after installing xf86-video-intel ...


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Linux does support wifi adapters. We can't foresee the future but most adapters should work fine. Why don't you install it and address specific issues as they arise, if they do.


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You have a huge list Devansh. but here is what is understood. Which Linux Distro you want to install. You need at least 100 GB of partition per Linux Distro system its totally depends on your package selection. If you leave space unattended in the disk management then it can be detected by the Linux OS while installation. you don't need to create a file ...



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