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3

These numbers disambiguate manual pages that have the same name. They represent the manual section that the page should be retrieved from. As an excerpt from Wikipedia states: The manual is generally split into eight numbered sections, organized as follows [...]


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Most of them used to be implemented at some point in Linux kernel history time, but some like at least vserver are still implemented in specific kernels. The majority of these calls is now essentially obsolete but their slot remains and contains a stub which role is not to break old code and allow a re-implementation in a specialized or new kernel should it ...


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Does a system call function often but not always have a command or utility in shell? Sometimes. System calls that are useful to expose, are usually exposed. A shell that couldn't change directories would not be a very useful shell. Some of them, like chdir, are implemented as shell builtins, because they can only affect the process that called them. ...


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There's a fantastic pair of articles on LWN that describe how syscalls work on Linux: "Anatomy of a system call", part 1 and part 2.


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The numbers are the sections in the manual. (1), for example, are commands.


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Basically there are two modes of linux kernel viz. User mode, Kernel mode. Any linux kernel switches itself back and forth between these two modes. Generally, Library calls get executed in User mode and System calls get executed in Kernel mode. In operating system terms, Kernel mode is Atomic in nature and its in Supervisory mode. Almost all Library ...


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It's in kernel space. This article from Linux Device Drivers is a bit dated but still should generally apply: https://lwn.net/images/pdf/LDD3/ch18.pdf However, there is some effort recently towards replacing the kernel driver with a userspace console called "KMSCON" -- see that project's site for more: http://cgit.freedesktop.org/~dvdhrm/kmscon/tree/README


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exec here could be a system call or a bash built-in or something else from this . And respective man pages related to system call or bash built-in refer to the exec's man page with numbers in the brackets. So if I want to refer to manpage of bash built-in, I would say exec(1) and if I want to refer to manpage of system call exec() i would say exec(2) The ...



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