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2

Put a script on: /usr/lib/pm-utils/sleep.d Mark it as executable with the commands you want to execute, and configured with the condition resume. #!/bin/bash case "$1" in resume) /etc/init.d/networking restart ;; esac


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I have figured out the culprit. Doing cat /proc/acpi/wakeup, and disabling the *enabled devices one by one (using, e.g., sudo echo 'DEVABBRV' > /proc/acpi/wakeup, where DEVABBRV is the device abbreviation listed in the cat output above), it turns out that LID0 is waking up the machine "prematurely". This is perhaps due to some non-standard, proprietary ...


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Quoting from here: The other answer is great! But it requires root cron. If you want to hibernate from non-sudo cron, there are 2 options: 1. Using polkit Make a file containing the following: [Enable hibernate to be run via cron] Identity=unix-user:* Action=org.freedesktop.login1.hibernate;org.freedesktop.login1.hibernate-...


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The currently accepted answer is great, but a little bit outdated for Ubuntu 16.04: The commands to get battery status have changed. The environment variables required for notify-send to work have changed. The script given there no longer works from user cron as hibernate requires root. systemctl hibernate is preferred over pm-hibernate. So, here is ...


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By default, Linux kernel reserves lowest 64K of system memory for BIOS and repeatedly scans that part of the memory for unexpected changes. If background scanning process notices that the memory has been unexpectedly changed (corrupted) it spams the kernel log with something along the lines Corrupted low memory at <virtual address> (<address> ...


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You need swap to properly hibernate, which means save the current state of the system to disk, power off the computer, then resume the previous state. However you don't need a swap partition/file to suspend the system, the difference here is in this case, the kernel will only turn off non-essential devices of the computer, (everything except, northbridge, ...


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Since the RAM is copied to a file when the computer enters hibernation and read back from that file when it wakes, the swappiness setting would not have any direct impact on it. The only things that could actually speed it up would be to... remove memory from the system, which would be counter productive for all other operations get a faster hard (or SSD) ...



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