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I'm not sure how you can examine any particular superblock, but you can use this command to examine the general contents that all the superblocks share like so, using dumpe2fs. $ sudo dumpe2fs /dev/mapper/fedora_greeneggs-home | less Example $ sudo dumpe2fs /dev/mapper/fedora_greeneggs-home | less Filesystem volume name: <none> Last mounted on: ...


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1.- Originally, fdisk created partitions trying to make them aligned to cylinder boundaries, leaving the first cylinder on disk free, as it would be used for the MBR, patition table and other stuff. This way, the first partition usually started on block 63 (each block being 512 bytes). The fdisk from distributions like RedHat 6.x, still works this way, but ...


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By some mystery I had wiped the volume group and the physical volume in it. It was just a matter of recovering them using the metadata I could back-up using testdisk. I copied the original /etc/lvm folder on the Desktop of the live user, then $ pvcreate --uuid "cZ83jX-WXkk-tNG4-ulGT-sAqq-HlKq-Omtqc8" \ --restorefile ...


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The resize_inode feature creates a hidden inode ( number 7, you can view it in debugfs with stat <7> ) to reserve those blocks so that the GDT can be grown. By default it reserves enough space to grow the filesystem to 1024 times its original size. You can disable the feature or adjust the size using options to mke2fs at format time. What does ...


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If the filesystem is really on that device, running mkfs.ext4 with the same arguments plus a -n will give you a list of superblocks that you can use as alternates. Eg: # mkfs.ext4 -n /dev/vg1/lvol2 ... Superblock backups stored on blocks: 32768, 98304, 163840, 229376, 294912, 819200, 884736, 1605632, 2654208 Then you can run e2fsck -b 32768 ...



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