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3

Have you checked the profile files? ~/.bashrc ~/.bash_profile /etc/bashrc /etc/profile The previous admin could have left that quota part as his custom shell login.


0

There seems to be multiple issues going on here... The primary confusion is that you sign public keys and not private keys. If you try to sign a private key named "id_rsa" ssh-keygen will just ignore that and use "id_rsa.pub" in the same directory. If that public key isn't there, it just gives you the same error message if you tried signing a file that ...


0

In Ubuntu 14.04, /etc/init.d/ssh restart doesn't restart sshd if upstart is running (and it is usually running), so sshd isn't recognizing your changes to /etc/ssh/sshd_config. Instead, run this: # restart ssh You can verify that sshd was restarted by running # ps -f -p $(pgrep sshd) or # ps -f -p $(status ssh | awk '{ print $NF }') and checking ...


2

Possibilities: sshd is reading a different config file from the one you've edited sshd is running in a chroot environment which doesn't include the file you specified sshd didn't really restart, perhaps because you have systemd and the init script for ssh exits when it realises upstart isn't running (in this case, use systemctl restart ssh.service). You're ...


0

Your client is not presenting a certificate, because it doesn't have one. You need to generate one (ssh-keygen -s keys/ca.key -I jruser -n jruser keys/client.key.pub). The new certificate (keys/client.key_cert.pub) will automatically be picked up by ssh and presented to the server. Your cert-authority line in authorized_keys lacks the required principals ...


0

The shell was set to an invalid path. Using chsh lbutlr and setting a valid path fixed the problem. Thanks to Gilles for pointing the way.


0

In the config you mention AllowUser lbutlr but the error message says illegal user butler. May be a mismatch in names causes the error.


0

In addition to the answers given: Debug mode might be helpful: [root@ip-10-41-162-92 ~]# /usr/sbin/sshd -df /etc/ssh/sshd_config.test debug1: sshd version OpenSSH_6.7, OpenSSL 1.0.1j 15 Oct 2014 ... debug1: rexec_argv[0]='/usr/sbin/sshd' debug1: rexec_argv[1]='-df' debug1: rexec_argv[2]='/etc/ssh/sshd_config.test' ... The output tells what file was used ...


8

Based on @Hauke Laging's comment. When you run strace on the sshd binary it outputs debugging information on how the program starts and what files it tries to access. From which we can use grep to list the /etc/ files which it tries to access. $ sudo strace -e trace=file /usr/sbin/sshd |& grep '^open('|grep '/etc/' open("/etc/ld.so.cache", O_RDONLY) ...


0

Since $DISPLAY is correctly set and the ~/.Xauthority file is not created, this can mean that, though X11 forwarding is taken into account, xauth is not run. One reason could be that it is not in the path (I had this problem under Mac OS X, but this would be strange under Linux). You may want to do the work yourself by creating a ~/.ssh/rc file. For ...


0

Not an answer to most of your questions, but too long for a comment: the reason for having a separate user (be it "admin" or whatever else) is exactly to put one more layer of authentication/authorization (log in as user with a key/password and then enter another password to become root) into the picture. Unless the user has the same UID as root, it does ...


0

You can try this Match Group "domain users". It worked for me. Even I am using this more difficult syntax than you Match Group "WORKGROUP\domain users".



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