Hot answers tagged

11

Yes. The password is sent over the encrypted connection, but it's in plaintext to the remote server. The usual way to authenticate is for the server to calculate a hash of the password and to compare it to a value saved on the server. There are several ways of saving hashes, and with current implementations, the client doesn't know what the server uses. (...


7

sshpass does not have to show the password in the ps. It might read it an environment variable: SSHPASS=12345 sshpass -e ssh user@host or from a file: sshpass -f /path/to/password_file ssh user@host


5

My sshpass has an option -f to read from a file. So with bash process substitution you can do sshpass -f <(myscript_call_1password) ssh host


3

netcat is an _application layer tool. It operates at the higher layers of the OSI stack (layer 7). So in a naive setup, computer C can not directly see computer A; the source of the IP traffic will appear to be from B. At an IP layer, all traffic will look like it originated from B because the netcat application is initiating and making the connection. ...


3

As I understand it, you want to run a command locally but save the stderr output to a remote log file. Try process substitution: local_command 2> >(ssh somemachine 'cat >logfile') Here, >(...) is process substitution. It creates a file-like object from the command in the parens. So, 2> redirects stderr to that file-like object, resulting ...


3

The ssh-agent and recent versions of OpenSSH make it simple: Start normal ssh-agent with default timeout for the keys added (60 minutes for example): eval `ssh-agent -t 60m` Configure your ssh to add actually used keys to the agent. Add a new line to ~/.ssh/config`: AddKeysToAgent yes This feature is in latest OpenSSH 7.2. In the previous versions, ...


3

If you're using password authentication, then SSH sends the password over the network. The connection is encrypted, so eavesdroppers can't see the password. The connection is authenticated, provided that you don't click blindly through a “The authenticity of … can't be established” message, so your password won't be sent to anyone except the legitimate ...


3

If you use a password based authentication scheme then, yes the password is passed over the network to the end point... But it is an encrypted channel. eg % ssh remotehost user@remotehost's password: bash$ logout In this scenario the password was sent encrypted over the network. This is why it is very important to handle known_hosts entries properly ...


3

The expect command you use: spawn ssh test@192.168.142.15 ls > ls_from_remotes_sys This, effectively calls exec("ssh","test@192.168.142.15","ls",">","ls_from_remotes_sys") That means the three parameters (ls, > and the filename) are sent to the remote system; ie the redirection happens on the remote system. A kludge could be to call it via sh ...


3

There is (obviously) manual page for vsftpd.conf, which is always a good place to start. TLDR version: They should be needed only for passive mode of FTP. pasv_enable Set to NO if you want to disallow the PASV method of obtaining a data connection. Default: YES pasv_address Use this option to override the IP address that vsftpd ...


2

Yes, ssh sends the password over the network, but after end-to-end encryption has been negotiated. See section 8 of RFC 4252 which says that a password authentication message contains plaintext password in ISO-10646 UTF-8 encoding [RFC3629]


2

Rebooting the Xquartz Client-side resolved the issue. My bad for not following rule 1. of turn it off and on again


2

Try FreeOTP, it supports both ​HOTP and ​TOTP. https://fedorahosted.org/freeotp/ https://f-droid.org/repository/browse/?fdfilter=freeotp&fdid=org.fedorahosted.freeotp


2

If you don't care about tracking stderr of the process while it is running, then you can use a temporary local file eg #!/bin/bash tmpfile=`mktemp` trap '/bin/rm -f $tmpfile ; exit' 0 1 2 3 15 run_command 2> $tmpfile if [ -s $tmpfile ] then scp $tmpfile remoteserver:logfile fi exit 0 If you want "live" data then you have buffering problems; ...


1

Answering the title, netcat uses TCP by default, but offers a UDP mode with the -u flag. socat can use a wide variety of protocols, including TCP, UDP, SCTP, and even netlink sockets on Linux; it also offers raw IP sockets (but you have to be root to use them). To answer your real question, it can't really be discerned from B what A's IP address is. However,...


1

Currently, RSA is still recommended as a gold standard (strong, wide compatibility) ed25519 is good (independent of NIST, but not compatible with old clients. Server is usually providing more different host key types, so you are targeting for compatibility. The order of priority in the client config is from the stronger to less strong, but more ...


1

The client can specify the hostkey algorithm it prefers with the option HostKeyAlgorithms in ssh_config or ~/.ssh/config or on the command line. man ssh_config on your system to see the default HostKeyAlgorithms preference for your version of openssh. The server will use the first key type which is on the client's list and exists on the server. If you ...


1

There are two interactions here. First SSH asks to confirm the server's identity. This is necessary because an adversary might impersonate the server, to tick you into logging in and providing your password or other confidential data. The first time you ever connect to a server, you need to verify the hosts's identity. After this, SSH remembers the ...


1

If you cannot confirm that key fingerprint as coming from your ubuntu host, the likely cause is that you are not really connecting to the host/service that you think you are. Not only are you getting a different host key, the key length of 1040 seems a bit peculiar. Doing a quick google search on the fingerprint 86:03:d0:87:3d:67:3a:9a:9b:83:7a:39:a7:2e:e7:...


1

When your command is on the local system, and your file argument is on the remote... Use process substitution. In Bash mpirun -np 16 <(ssh server cat c.x) The <(command) syntax allows you to convert output from a shell command into a file, basically. In Zsh mpirun -np 16 =(ssh server cat c.x) When your file is on the local system and you ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible