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7

You mention that the second server is using the Andrew File System (AFS). I haven't worked with that, but from what I understand it, AFS is a Kerberos-secured filesystem which requires a kerberos ticket in order to work. That means you need to be logged to your site's Kerberos realm in order to be able to access your home directory. If you log on with ...


4

You should try to connect to server2 with: ssh -v tim@server2 and compare that with the same, connecting to server1 this will tell you exactly where the two servers differ. Most likely there is a difference in /etc/ssh/sshd_config on both machines. where server2 or your ~/.ssh has accessibility problems (not restricted enough). From the -v output you ...


3

Just set another TERM, For example TERM="rxvt" or TERM="xterm" or TERM="vt102" Maybe an export TERM helps too. The TERM variable is used by curses and termcap programs, such as mc or dialog, to read the terminal escape codes from the terminfo/termcap databases, where the command is executed, so in your case in the remote system. To support the ...


3

The $PATH is getting expanded prior to running on the remote server. Example #1 Say I run these commands from a system called skinner.bubba.net. [root@skinner ~]# ssh mulder 'bash -s' <<EOL > echo $HOSTNAME > hostname > EOL skinner.bubba.net mulder.bubba.net By moving the single quote so that the echo $HOSTNAME is inside it, you can ...


3

You use the -X switch. From the man page: -X Send the specified command to a running screen session. You can use the -d or -r option to tell screen to look only for attached or detached screen sessions. Note that this command doesn't work if the session is password protected. To combine this with actually seeing the screen: ...


2

Yes, you have to specify a destination IP and port when using local forwarding. From man ssh: -L [bind_address:]port:host:hostport Specifies that the given port on the local (client) host is to be forwarded to the given host and port on the remote side. Clearly, only the bind address is optional. No, you can't specify a destination ...


2

GNU screen is setting $TERM locally, and ssh is passing that value to the remote side. There are a few things you can do. Detect the screen-256-color-s on the remote side and set to a more sane. From that you can have case $TERM in screen-256*) TERM=screen;; esac. From the local side, have screen set the terminal. In your ~/.screenrc file have: term ...


1

You specified the private key as /root/.ssh/id_rsa. Does the script run as root? As here "IdentityFile ~/.ssh/id_rsa" >> /root/.ssh/config you tell it to look under the current user's home directory rather than specifically /root/.ssh/id_rsa. It's behaving as if you're passing it the wrong key. I don't use docker but maybe that might be relevant to ...


1

Add -q to the command you use to run ssh, from the man page: -q Quiet mode. Causes most warning and diagnostic messages to be suppressed. SSH man page


1

I just ran into this problem connecting to a headless RHEL7 server. You need the xorg-x11-xauth package installed on your host in order for the DISPLAY variable to get set, and to be properly authorized. Hope I saved somebody some time.


1

Shared memory is a mechanism to exchange rendered image without having to use sockets, the protocol works something like this: X client create the shared buffer, X client tell the server that's where you will find the images i create, the server "attach" itself to the shared memory and refresh whenever there is an update, this mechanism is 10x of socket ...


1

This is one possible way to do what you are looking for: tmux sets environment variables in the shells it creates (example $TMUX, $TMUX_PANE), its possible to detect these and run your ssh command to inform your remote session how client has started, we are looking at two steps. First, detecting where ssh is being started, this can be done in a function, ...



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