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6

It shows ? since there is no TTY (terminal interface) to which this process is attached. This is fortunate since sshd is a system daemon and should not be dependent on a client session. As mentioned in the comments, closing a session will terminate all related processes for that TTY, which is not desired for system wide processes.


5

When troubleshooting problems with daemons, you should always check the system logs. In this particular case, if you check your system logs on the NAS host, you'll see something similar to: Authentication refused: bad ownership or modes for directory /home/admin The problem is shown in this output: admin@NAS:~$ ls -alh drwxrwxrwx 6 admin users 4.0K Jun ...


3

It is possible to add multiple lines of LocalForward: Host myhost Hostname 123.123.123.123 IdentityFile ~/.ssh/id_myhost LocalForward 8811 localhost:8811 LocalForward 6006 localhost:6006 IdentitiesOnly yes Is this what you want?


2

You can use a parallel shell such as clustershell or pdsh. This way, assuming you already set up a passwordless SSH authentication from a central machine, you can run a command on each of the 100 servers at the same time. You can also go further and do various groups in order to organize them logically. Lets assume your machines are named aws0, aws1, aws2, ...


2

Sshd doesn't care where the connection is coming from, if it's configured to do a reverse DNS lookup, it does.


1

exit 1 signals an error condition. For a script like this you should not include an exit there. Try this function instead. You can provide the host and port on the command line for startManagedWeblogic.shm, or you can export the variables before starting the server. If you read the startManagedWebLogic.sh script, you should find a variable you can export ...


1

Any chance you created a password for your private key while creating it using ssh-keygen. Following is the workflow I use: ssh-keygen ssh-copy-id root@remote_host scp /test.text root@remote_host:/opt/application/


1

You can set the option UseDNS no in the file /etc/ssh/sshd_config on your server to tell sshd(8) not to do DNS lookups.


1

Much easier way would be to disable hashing of your known_hosts with HashKnownHosts no in your ~/.ssh/config to allow autocomplete from all history, or just list your hosts in your ~/.ssh/config (you can store there all your Ports and Users, or create aliases). I appreciate the creativity, but why to reinvent wheel when we have got already the same ...


1

So as I only and only want to know how to autocomplete my hosts targets within the bash_history file, I found this feature hoping to help anybody in the same situation. Just execute the following line $ complete -W "$(echo $(grep '^ssh ' .bash_history | sort -u | sed 's/^ssh //'))" ssh complete - is a bash builtin function. So there is not a binary on ...



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