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3

Try xpra. This is similar to ssh -X, except it is faster and you can disconnect and re-connect to the session as many times as you like.


3

I think you're confusing the various technologies and how they work. I wouldn't expect that the notification daemon from one system could send messages via SSH. Setting the $DISPLAY is how X11 sends the output from an application to another for displaying purposes, but the notify-send is sending an actual message to the notification daemon. This message is ...


3

Curl can display the file the same way cat would. No need to delete the file since it simply displayed the output unless you tell it to do otherwise. curl -u username:password sftp://hostname/path/to/file.txt If you use public key authentication: curl -u username: --key ~/.ssh/id_rsa --pubkey sftp://hostname/path/to/file.txt If you use the default ...


1

The solution is this. 1) On your terminal, create an array with all hosts/IP addresses you want to copy the id_rsa.pub. For example hosts=( host1 host2 192.168.100.200 host4 ) 2) Create the expect file save it and make it executable using chmod +x filename #!/usr/bin/expect -f if { $argc != 4 } { puts stderr "usage: ./expt host pass user keyfile" ...


1

In order for two machines to communicate, they need to know each other's IP address. That's how they know where to send packets. You can't communicate with someone if you don't know where to send their messages. Tunneling allows machines to communicate without knowing each other's IP address by embedding packets inside another communication layer and using ...


1

I've figured out what's going on. The messages are coming to the server from remote hosts via UDP. I didn't notice the host field changing at first, my mistake. BTW, actually there is a possibility to login using public key authentication with no authorized_keys file involved. RedHat (and variants) have a supported patch for OpenSSH that adds the ...


1

Use fail2ban which uses the firewall to disable access to ssh (and optionally, other services) after a certain number of failed attempts. By default, it blocks for 30 minutes after 3 failed attempts, but is configurable using (I believe) the maxretry value.


1

If you can install the rlwrap utility, then it is as simple as doing rlwrap ./yourscript.sh This will allow you to use the up and down array keys to browse through history, as well as the right and left arrow keys for editing the current command, for programs that do not support it already.


1

You've edited the file /etc/passwd with a Windows editor, or with an editor configured to produce Windows files. Don't do that. Windows uses the two-character sequence CR-LF to represent a line break, whereas Linux and other unix systems use just LF and see that CR as an ordinary character that happens to be last on its line. Generally speaking, use a Linux ...



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