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Cisco routers has Telnet open by default. You have to explicitly make the configuration for SSH (set a domain, generase RSA, enable SSH 2.0 etc). Read the Cisco's documentation about how to configure Cisco and SSH.


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Transparent Multi-hop SSH If i understand your question correctly you're looking for a solution to ssh transparently into your lab server through the machine that's visible from the outside (let's call it gate). As lbutlr mentioned first thing that comes to mind is to ssh into gate first and from there to ssh into your lab server. This works but it's not ...


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Your question seems unclear to me, and I'm not sure why you want ssh-tunneling. How do you login to the visible machine? If that is ssh, then can't you simply ssh from that machine to the internal machines? For example, when I am away from home, I ssh to my home server, then from there I ssh to 10.0.0.125 which is my desktop machine inside my home LAN. ...


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BindAddress is not the option you're after. From man ssh_config: BindAddress Use the specified address on the local machine as the source address of the connection. Only useful on systems with more than one address. The configuration file equivalent of -R is RemoteForward: RemoteForward Specifies that a TCP port on ...


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Quite an interesting problem you've got. The real solution would be to ask your sysadmin for help first. If that's not an option, the next best thing is to have pyCharm's libssh or whatever it uses (I did some googling and couldn't figure it out) parse your `~/.ssh/config'. If that's not possible, you might be able to run your own ssh daemon on the remote ...


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I realized the solution was much simpler than I expected, simply create an SSH tunnel like so: ssh -f -p port username@ip -L 3306:ip:3306 -N Where port is the port of the web server, and ip is the IP address of it. I'm working on using AutoSSH to keep a persistent connection.


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From your workstation set up tunneling via: ssh -L8080:192.168.1.20:80 server10 Where "server10" is the public name you use to reach 192.168.1.10. This will listen locally on port 8080 and forward any data to 192.168.1.20:80 from the target host. An alternative is using the -D option for ssh for setting up a socks proxy. This will allow you to reach ...


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My solution was similar to @slm's but I used SOCKS instead because it is simpler and required no proxy installation on the server or client. Run all commands on the computer with restricted acccess. in yum.conf set the proxy as follows proxy=socks5h://localhost:1080 from a terminal type ssh -D 1080 YOUR_USER@YOUR_SERVER_WITH_FULL_WEB_ACCESS press ...


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You should be able to proxy YUM's traffic over the SSH connection like so: add to the /etc/yum.conf on the protected server: proxy=http://127.0.0.1:8080 from the server with normal inbound/outbound ssh access: $ ssh -R 8080:ssh.server:8080 user@protected.server On the server where you want to run YUM commands: $ yum update References Port Forward ...


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I would enable this script so that it's verbose and writes its output to a file so that you can more easily ascertain what's tripping it up. For increased verbosity add this before the first if statement. set -x To get the script logging everything to a file you can use this method that's described in this SO Q&A titled: How can i fully log all bash ...



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