Tag Info

New answers tagged

3

Very high level overview: The -D option tells ssh to listen for connections on that port using the SOCKS protocol. You configure Firefox to connect to ssh and speak the SOCKS protocol. You type http://www.google.com into your browser. Firefox connects to that SOCKS port. SOCKS can do a bunch of things, but what we're interested in is this: Firefox asks the ...


3

When you visit a website (one that's not hindered by your corporate firewall) your browser sends a request to the server listed in the URL on port 80 (by default). For example, to visit this site our browsers communicate with port 80 of the server unix.stackexchange.com When you set your proxy settings you told your browser to send everything to localhost ...


0

SSH itself doesn't check source IP addresses under any circumstances, to my knowledge (they can be spoofed anyway). So you'd probably have to use a packet filter on B (e.g. iptables) and set it up so that incoming TCP packets with destination port 1235 must have B as their source address.


2

Use the -g option with SSH and then configure firewall rules to only allow C to connect to the port. -g Allows remote hosts to connect to local forwarded ports. The command would then be: ssh -g -D 1235 a@A


0

Just came across this question. I ran into this problem on Fedora 20 and discovered, duhhhh, that I had installed the 32-bit version of mysql-workbench on 64-bit Fedora 20 instead of the 64-bit version. After uninstalling the 32-bit version: $ sudo yum remove mysql-workbench and installing the 64-bit version instead $ sudo yum localinstall ...



Top 50 recent answers are included