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10

I have drawn some sketches The machine, where the ssh tunnel command is typed is called »your host«. Introduction local: -L Specifies that the given port on the local (client) host is to be forwarded to the given host and port on the remote side. ssh -L sourcePort:forwardToHost:onPort connectToHost means: connect with ssh to connectToHost, and ...


7

strace -e trace=connect -f yourprogram or using a dump file strace -o yourprogram.strace -e trace=connect -f yourprogram


6

As said in other posts, if you don't want a prompt on the remote host, you must use the -N option of SSH. But this just keeps SSH running without having a prompt, and the shell busy. You just need to put the SSH'ing as a background task with the & sign : ssh -N -L 8080:ww.xx.yy.zz:80 user@server & This will launch the ssh tunnelling in the ...


5

I have drawn some sketches The machine, where the ssh tunnel command is typed (or in your case: Putty with tunneling is started) is called »your host«. Introduction local: -L Specifies that the given port on the local (client) host is to be forwarded to the given host and port on the remote side. ssh -L sourcePort:forwardToHost:onPort ...


5

When you connect to a remove machine via ssh with X11 forwarding enabled, ssh on the server creates a .Xauthority file in the user's home directory. Because ssh listens for X11 on a TCP socket, anyone can connect. Because anyone can connect, we need some way of preventing just anyone from using your display. This is done with that .Xauthority file. The file ...


4

I have drawn some sketches The machine, where the ssh tunnel command is typed is called »your host«. Introduction local: -L Specifies that the given port on the local (client) host is to be forwarded to the given host and port on the remote side. ssh -L sourcePort:forwardToHost:onPort connectToHost means: connect with ssh to connectToHost, and ...


4

I have drawn some sketches The machine, where the ssh tunnel command is typed is called »your host«. Introduction local: -L Specifies that the given port on the local (client) host is to be forwarded to the given host and port on the remote side. ssh -L sourcePort:forwardToHost:onPort connectToHost means: connect with ssh to connectToHost, and ...


4

Very high level overview: The -D option tells ssh to listen for connections on that port using the SOCKS protocol. You configure Firefox to connect to ssh and speak the SOCKS protocol. You type http://www.google.com into your browser. Firefox connects to that SOCKS port. SOCKS can do a bunch of things, but what we're interested in is this: Firefox asks the ...


3

This is what you need. #user@A: ssh -N user@B -L 9999:C:9999 When you connect from A with telnet #user@A: telnet localhost 9999


3

You can do this through ssh's ProxyCommand facility. Add the following to your $HOME/.ssh/config file. Create it if it doesn't exist with just this content: Host remoteserverX User userint ProxyCommand ssh userext@externalserver nc remoteserverX %p Host remoteserverY User userint ProxyCommand ssh userext@externalserver nc remoteserverY %p ...


3

SSH SOCKS5 Tunnelling using PuTTY: Firstly connect to your server via SSH using PuTTY. Right-click on the top bar and hit 'change settings'. Goto Connection/SSH/tunnels. Source port: 4567, select 'Dynamic' and hit 'Add' Open up your choice of browser, and configure the 'Manual Proxy settings' to listen on port 4567 on localhost (127.0.0.1). In Firefox ...


3

When you visit a website (one that's not hindered by your corporate firewall) your browser sends a request to the server listed in the URL on port 80 (by default). For example, to visit this site our browsers communicate with port 80 of the server unix.stackexchange.com When you set your proxy settings you told your browser to send everything to localhost ...


2

I'm not sure exactly what you are asking, but I suspect that you are interested in the ssh -g flag, which "Allows remote hosts to connect to local forwarded ports."


2

If you have a low bandwidth I recommend compression of the video stream: ssh USER@REMOTEHOST ffmpeg -an -f video4linux2 -s 640x480 -i /dev/video0 -r 10 -b:v 500k -f matroska - | mplayer - -idle -demuxer matroska where -an turns of audio encoding. If you want audio, replace -an with -f alsa -ac 1 -i hw:3 (where hw:3 could also be hw:0 or hw:1, … See ...


2

A possibility could be to download whatever you need from your client and then send those files by scp to your server if it accept scp. scp file_to_send user@server_ip:/location_of_the_file I don't know if what your asking is possible as your server has no acces to the client.


2

Using an Expect script to send a hard-coded plaintext password is generally a Very Bad Idea. If you needs scriptable, passwordless SSH connections, it's far better to use key-pair authentication: ssh-keygen # and then follow the prompts; don't set a passphrase ssh-copy-id username@remote.host.example.com After doing so, you can ssh ...


2

I often do the same thing with LocalForward directives. I also use connection muxing with ControlMaster, ControlPersist, and ControlPath directives; if I want to have a connection that I use just for the tunnels, since my connections' muxers persist for 30 minutes, I can ssh user@hostname.example.com logout and have 30 minutes to open any tunnelled ...


2

You have two options. Either use different source addresses or use a socks proxy. Different source addresses Your lo interface is configured as 127.0.0.1/8, i.e. all addresses starting with 127 do belong to the current host. The syntax for your tunnel is -L [bind_address:] port:host:hostport Therefore you can use something like: ssh -L ...


2

OpenSSH is secure enough to be accessible over the open Internet, if configured properly. So setting up a reverse tunnel that is publicly accessible is fine, if the forwarded port is secured properly. Some tips for securing OpenSSH: Protocol 2 PermitRootLogin no HostBasedAuthentication no PasswordAuthentication no UsePrivilegeSeparation yes ...


2

Assuming you have: A with ip address ip_A B with ip address ip_B C with ip address ip_C From a first terminal connect to the B and set a tunnel to C on ssh (port 10022 is used for the tunnel but it can be anything else): ssh ip_B -L10022:ip_C:22 Then from another terminal, you will be able to connect "directly" to C from A by using the tunnel you just ...


2

Providing you have already set up your tunnel on A to C via B, then You want #user@D: ssh -N user@A -L 9999:localhost:9999 #user@D: telnet localhost 9999


2

You can do that by using lsof to check which TCP ports are in state LISTEN and used by sshd: [jenny@willow ~]$ sudo lsof -iTCP -sTCP:LISTEN | grep sshd sshd 1084 root 3u IPv6 0xffffff0003fed888 0t0 TCP *:ssh (LISTEN) sshd 1084 root 4u IPv4 0xffffff0003fed5b0 0t0 TCP *:ssh (LISTEN) sshd 47607 jenny 7u IPv6 ...


2

First, set-up squid - sudo apt-get install squid Follow the directions at the above link to configure it. Allow only localhost to be secure. Then, set-up port-forwarding - from local port 3128 to remote port 3128 (to use the squid defaults); then configure your web-browser to use port 3128 and localhost as your proxy. Requests will go over the ssh port ...


2

Here is a step by step tutorial to make it a VPN server. VPN will send all your internet traffic through an encrypted tunnel to your VPS: First, install the pptpd package. pptpd offers a PPTP-type VPN which is supported by Microsoft and other network vendors. This is also the easiest to setup. sudo apt-get install pptpd Next up, edit /etc/pptpd.conf with ...


2

I do not have access to Slackware but I believe you need to install the Python binding/wrapper libraries for paramiko as well. At least that's the case on Fedora/CentOS and other distros from what I can gather from this forum post titled: MySQL Forums :: MySQL Workbench :: Ubuntu: Cannot start SSH tunnel manager. thanks ! install python-paramiko solve ...


2

Use the -g option with SSH and then configure firewall rules to only allow C to connect to the port. -g Allows remote hosts to connect to local forwarded ports. The command would then be: ssh -g -D 1235 a@A


1

You are just creating another tunnel, it is not connecting to the existing tunnel. You probably want to connect to "localhost" on machine A instead (instead of C, which is already tunneled through B from A).


1

Just another option: the auditd of Linux support system call logging. sudo auditctl -a entry,always -F arch=b64 -S connect Something better compare to strace: you can filter by multiple condition. For example: Audit/Log all failed connect system call: sudo auditctl -a entry,always -F arch=b64 -F success!=0 -S connect Audit/Log all connect system call by ...


1

In search of restarting the sshd after updating AuthorizedKeysFile in /etc/ssh/sshd_config RSAAuthentication yes PubkeyAuthentication yes AuthorizedKeysFile %h/.ssh/authorized_keys I got here with exact same error Which guided me to install: sudo apt-get install openssh-server sudo initctl reload-configuration sudo service ssh start ...


1

You can run a proxy on Computer A that computer B would then connect to in order to access the internet through Computer A. Something like this +----------+ +-----------+ | |+----SSH+-->| | | A | | B | |+--------+| | | ...



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