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I have drawn some sketches The machine, where the ssh tunnel command is typed is called »your host«. Introduction local: -L Specifies that the given port on the local (client) host is to be forwarded to the given host and port on the remote side. ssh -L sourcePort:forwardToHost:onPort connectToHost means: connect with ssh to connectToHost, and ...


7

strace -e trace=connect -f yourprogram or using a dump file strace -o yourprogram.strace -e trace=connect -f yourprogram


7

I have drawn some sketches The machine, where the ssh tunnel command is typed (or in your case: Putty with tunneling is started) is called »your host«. Introduction local: -L Specifies that the given port on the local (client) host is to be forwarded to the given host and port on the remote side. ssh -L sourcePort:forwardToHost:onPort ...


4

I have drawn some sketches The machine, where the ssh tunnel command is typed is called »your host«. Introduction local: -L Specifies that the given port on the local (client) host is to be forwarded to the given host and port on the remote side. ssh -L sourcePort:forwardToHost:onPort connectToHost means: connect with ssh to connectToHost, and ...


4

An especially good solution for scripting is to use "master" mode, with a socket for control commands: ssh -f -N -M -S <path-to-socket> -L <post>:<host>:<port> <server> To close it again: ssh -S <path-to-socket> -O exit <server> This avoids both grepping for process ids and any timing issues that might be ...


4

I have drawn some sketches The machine, where the ssh tunnel command is typed is called »your host«. Introduction local: -L Specifies that the given port on the local (client) host is to be forwarded to the given host and port on the remote side. ssh -L sourcePort:forwardToHost:onPort connectToHost means: connect with ssh to connectToHost, and ...


4

If you have a low bandwidth I recommend compression of the video stream: ssh USER@REMOTEHOST ffmpeg -an -f video4linux2 -s 640x480 -i /dev/video0 -r 10 -b:v 500k -f matroska - | mplayer - -idle -demuxer matroska where -an turns off audio encoding. If you want audio, replace -an with -f alsa -ac 1 -i hw:3 (where hw:3 could also be hw:0 or hw:1, … See ...


4

Very high level overview: The -D option tells ssh to listen for connections on that port using the SOCKS protocol. You configure Firefox to connect to ssh and speak the SOCKS protocol. You type http://www.google.com into your browser. Firefox connects to that SOCKS port. SOCKS can do a bunch of things, but what we're interested in is this: Firefox asks the ...


4

From your workstation set up tunneling via: ssh -L8080:192.168.1.20:80 server10 Where "server10" is the public name you use to reach 192.168.1.10. This will listen locally on port 8080 and forward any data to 192.168.1.20:80 from the target host. An alternative is using the -D option for ssh for setting up a socks proxy. This will allow you to reach ...


3

-f -N is what you are looking for: ssh -f -N -L MY_LOCAL_PORT:FOREIGN_ADDRESS:FOREIGN_PORT MYUSER@SSH_SERVER


3

In /etc/ssh/sshd_config make sure the following is uncommented: AllowTCPForwarding yes Double check your syntax too: $ ssh -N -L [local_port]:[endpoint]:[remote_port] [user]@[host] The error you're seeing is a terribly confusing error that is thrown when a forwarded ssh connection simply can't connect.


3

SSH SOCKS5 Tunnelling using PuTTY: Firstly connect to your server via SSH using PuTTY. Right-click on the top bar and hit 'change settings'. Goto Connection/SSH/tunnels. Source port: 4567, select 'Dynamic' and hit 'Add' Open up your choice of browser, and configure the 'Manual Proxy settings' to listen on port 4567 on localhost (127.0.0.1). In Firefox ...


3

In a very weird case, I also experienced this error while trying to create a local tunnel. My command was something like this: ssh -L 1234:localhost:1234 user@remote The problem was, on the remote host, /etc/hosts had no entry for "localhost" so the ssh server didn't know how to setup the tunnel. A very unfriendly error message for this case; glad I ...


3

This is what you need. #user@A: ssh -N user@B -L 9999:C:9999 When you connect from A with telnet #user@A: telnet localhost 9999


3

You can do that by using lsof to check which TCP ports are in state LISTEN and used by sshd: [jenny@willow ~]$ sudo lsof -iTCP -sTCP:LISTEN | grep sshd sshd 1084 root 3u IPv6 0xffffff0003fed888 0t0 TCP *:ssh (LISTEN) sshd 1084 root 4u IPv4 0xffffff0003fed5b0 0t0 TCP *:ssh (LISTEN) sshd 47607 jenny 7u IPv6 ...


3

When you visit a website (one that's not hindered by your corporate firewall) your browser sends a request to the server listed in the URL on port 80 (by default). For example, to visit this site our browsers communicate with port 80 of the server unix.stackexchange.com When you set your proxy settings you told your browser to send everything to localhost ...


2

Assuming you have: A with ip address ip_A B with ip address ip_B C with ip address ip_C From a first terminal connect to the B and set a tunnel to C on ssh (port 10022 is used for the tunnel but it can be anything else): ssh ip_B -L10022:ip_C:22 Then from another terminal, you will be able to connect "directly" to C from A by using the tunnel you just ...


2

Providing you have already set up your tunnel on A to C via B, then You want #user@D: ssh -N user@A -L 9999:localhost:9999 #user@D: telnet localhost 9999


2

Here is a step by step tutorial to make it a VPN server. VPN will send all your internet traffic through an encrypted tunnel to your VPS: First, install the pptpd package. pptpd offers a PPTP-type VPN which is supported by Microsoft and other network vendors. This is also the easiest to setup. sudo apt-get install pptpd Next up, edit /etc/pptpd.conf with ...


2

First, set-up squid - sudo apt-get install squid Follow the directions at the above link to configure it. Allow only localhost to be secure. Then, set-up port-forwarding - from local port 3128 to remote port 3128 (to use the squid defaults); then configure your web-browser to use port 3128 and localhost as your proxy. Requests will go over the ssh port ...


2

I do not have access to Slackware but I believe you need to install the Python binding/wrapper libraries for paramiko as well. At least that's the case on Fedora/CentOS and other distros from what I can gather from this forum post titled: MySQL Forums :: MySQL Workbench :: Ubuntu: Cannot start SSH tunnel manager. thanks ! install python-paramiko solve ...


2

Use the -g option with SSH and then configure firewall rules to only allow C to connect to the port. -g Allows remote hosts to connect to local forwarded ports. The command would then be: ssh -g -D 1235 a@A


2

Quite an interesting problem you've got. The real solution would be to ask your sysadmin for help first. If that's not an option, the next best thing is to have pyCharm's libssh or whatever it uses (I did some googling and couldn't figure it out) parse your `~/.ssh/config'. If that's not possible, you might be able to run your own ssh daemon on the remote ...


2

Cisco routers has Telnet open by default. You have to explicitly make the configuration for SSH (set a domain, generase RSA, enable SSH 2.0 etc). Read the Cisco's documentation about how to configure Cisco and SSH.


2

You need a desktop manager like xdm, gdm or kdm, configure it for remote access via XDMCP. Once the desktop manager on the desktop PC is set up to accept remote connections you do Xorg :1 vt8 -query <put desktop PC address here> on your netbook. KDM setup Depending on your distribution and version, the name and location of the config files may ...


2

That's about it, but you've inverted home and office. The point is that the office firewall rejects outgoing connections other than web traffic. But since HTTPS traffic and SSH traffic are both encrypted, it can't easily distinguish between them, so the firewall just blocks outgoing connections to ports other than 443 (the standard HTTPS port) and probably ...


1

If the tunnel terminates for any reason, screen won't restart it. I've found autossh works really well for managing tunnels - it can can monitor and restart them when necessary. It's ideal for starting tunnels from init scripts, for example.


1

Take two (see history for a version which does scp from server side and is a bit simpler), this should do it. The gist of it is this: pass an environment variable from client to server, telling server how it can detect when port information is avaiable and then get and use it. once port information is available, copy it from client to server, allowing ...


1

Instead of burring your head in the complicated tc I recommend you using wondershaper. It configures the optimal options both outgoing and incoming traffic by default. The syntax is simple enough. Just verify the device you want to configure such eth0, calculate the raw uplink and downlink bits. Normally network providers supply bits as measure, like "1 ...


1

Oh. Silly me. This is covered in the manual even though I missed it. I should have added the -N-switch. This is what I put in in rc.local and which works: su [username] -c 'autossh -f -N -F /home/[username]/.ssh/config_tunnels -i /home/[username]/.ssh/id_rsa remotehost.com [username] is of course exchanged with my username.



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