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That's about it, but you've inverted home and office. The point is that the office firewall rejects outgoing connections other than web traffic. But since HTTPS traffic and SSH traffic are both encrypted, it can't easily distinguish between them, so the firewall just blocks outgoing connections to ports other than 443 (the standard HTTPS port) and probably ...


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Instead of wondering how to cope with a complex chain of SSH forwardings, separate the problems. Configure your system to have transparent access to every host. This is done once and for all in your ~/.ssh/config file. To teach SSH to use a machine as a proxy to another machine, declare a ProxyCommand . Host priv-server User user ProxyCommand ssh -W ...


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This would be simple if you try a native sshfs which is recently added. Install sudo apt-get install sshfs sshfs -ttA user@pub-server ssh user@priv-server This will do the magic. For more infor see here Linux Journal


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Instead use a more low level form of copying files by catting them locally, and piping that into a remote cat > filename command on priv-server: $ cat file1.txt | ssh -A user@pub-server 'ssh user@priv-server "cat > file1.txt"' or with compression: $ gzip -c file1.txt | ssh -A user@pub-server 'ssh user@priv-server "gunzip -c > file1.txt"' ...


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I am not entirely clear on what the post talks about but I have been using something similar to redirect the http traffic over ssh from a remote server which does not support X forwarding. I do it as follows: ssh -L23000:localhost:23000 user@remotehost [remotehost] $ python -m SimpleHTTPServer 23000 Open browser on localhost and point it to ...



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