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2

Don't (directly) delete the snapshots (moreover clones) the other replies are suggesting you to do. Your server has multiple boot environments. You can list them with this command: beadm list If you do not need to rollback to a previously created boot environment, you can remove it with this command: beadm destroy boot-environment-name


1

zfs list report it rpool/ROOT 31.9G 11.3G 31K legacy rpool/ROOT/solaris-7 95.3M 11.3G 8.57G / rpool/ROOT/solaris-7/var 27.1M 11.3G 20.5G /var rpool/ROOT/solaris-8 31.8G 11.3G 5.95G / rpool/ROOT/solaris-8/var 21.0G 11.3G 285M /var as told by @andrew this is old snapshot, if you ...


1

You missed snapshots and/or clones. Examine the output from zfs list -t all.


0

http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E23824_01/html/E24456/userenv-1.html Looks like we don't really need MANPATH at all, simply adjust PATH and the man commands would do the rest.


0

Commenting or removing the line: #define USE_RAWDISK 1 in lib/orcallator.se seems to have fixed the problem for me.


3

You should be able to built most Linux software by hand (except very linux-kernel specific software), but as there are Illumos-based distributions which include package manager, it should be way more easy to use them and install pre-built software packages from the corresponding repositories. Using distributions with GNU userspace enhances also the ...


5

On Solaris, password constraints can be configured by editing the /etc/default/password file , eg: $ pfedit /etc/default/password ... MINDIGIT=0 ...


2

Assuming a dedicated zfs file system was created for that user, you should be able to delete it with: zfs destroy rpool/export/home/user


1

Your version of SUNWpkgcmdsu is old. So make sure you have the recent/latest patches applied for SUNWpkgcmdsu. The CheckMK package is running /usr/sadm/bin/install/pkginstall -o ... which errors. Your system's /usr/sadm/bin/install/pkginstall doesn't support the option -o option. pkginstall is part of Sun's SUNWpkgcmdsu package. SUNWpkgcmdsu ...


0

You should use TZ=localtime on Solaris 11. It is a symbolic link to actual timezone file, but it allows to switch timezones without restarting processes. This symlink is created by svc:/system/timezone:default SMF service, so simply update its configuration: # svccfg -s timezone:default svc:/system/timezone:default> setprop timezone/localtime = ...


0

I was able to fix the dual-boot. Actually I installed linux's grub in /dev/sda1, and chainloader was able to pick up fedora's boot; I slightly modified my /rpool/boot/grub/custom.cfg: menuitem "Fedora 12" { insmod part_gpt insmod chain set root=(hd0,gpt1) chainloader +1 boot } It also helped carefully re-read the following article at ...


4

Not with a single command that I'm aware of. Solaris ps gets process data for such things as command-line arguments from the /proc/[PID]/psinfo file, which contains data that fills a struct psinfo per /usr/include/sys/procfs.h: #define PRARGSZ 80 /* number of chars of arguments */ typedef struct psinfo { int pr_flag; /* process flags ...


1

I think you can use ps -eo args if you want to see the every arguments Anyway you can combine the first example with more options ps -eo user,pid,args


2

They're not all installed. To "remove" them, don't use the -af flag to pkg list. From the Solaris pkg man page: ... list [-Hafnsuv] [-g path_or_uri ...] [--no-refresh] [pkg_fmri_pattern ...] ... With -f and -a, list all versions of all packages for all variants regardless of incorporation constraints or installed state. ... Because ...


3

You shouldn't be using the live media for this at all. That creates a new in-memory instance of the OS on every boot, with nothing saved from the previous boot. This means that if you write any code and save it, it is being saved to a RAM disk that will go away when you reboot. You could save your changes to some other system and then copy them back on each ...


1

Based on the append to the main post - you seem to be looking for a formatted file that can be opened int Excel. It is more advisable then to convert the entire file to an HTML table, with your particular lines been converted to bold. If it is a simple CSV ( with no commas used purely as separators and not occuring within the columns itself) then you can ...


0

awk $ awk '{print $1*$3/100}' file 13721725 7.20358e+08 261414528 Assuming you don't want the "scientific" notation: $ awk '{printf "%.1f\n", $1*$3/100}' file 13721725.0 720357926.4 261414528.0


1

Try this with ksh: while read A B C; do tmp=$(($A*$C/100)) echo $tmp done < foo.txt > out1.txt Output to out1.txt: 13721725 720357926 261414528 See: Performing arithmetic on variables in the Korn shell


0

Try to change the boot menu entry from the grub menu list and append -B console=ttya to the kernel line. Then try to boot and see if this gives you the desired result. To make the change permanent, edit /rpool/boot/grub/menu.lst and search for kernel /platform/i86pc/multiboot Append -B console=ttya to this line and save the file


3

Which firmware are you talking about? If it is the OBP version that you're looking for, prtdiag -v will help you in most cases: System PROM revisions: ---------------------- OBP 4.16.1 2004/09/03 04:22 Sun Fire V210/V240,Netra 240 OBDIAG 4.16.1 2004/09/03 04:23 The output of prtconf -pv may also have relevant sections: Node 0xf002ce38 version: ...


5

A regular Solaris instance will provide you the global zone. Using zonecfg and zoneadm you can configure and install zones A typical zone creation is performed by: #configure the zone zonecfg -z zu9dms create #make some modifications if you want an alternate zonepath or autoboot for example verify exit It is very important that the directory which will ...


1

Well, i found myself what i wanted. This works in Solaris 5.10. paste file1 file2| pr -t -e$(awk 'n<length {n=length} END {print n+1}' file1) I am storing the length of longest string in first file and using it to tab delimit Multi File scenario Provided we know which file is going to have the longest word i would replace that file name in calculating ...


4

pr I'd probably go w/ pr: printf %s\\n hi wonderful amazing sorry \ superman superhumanwith loss >/tmp/file #^what is all of that, anyway?^ seq 7 | pr -tm /tmp/file - pr can -merge input files (here /tmp/file and - stdin) line-by-line like paste column-wise, but it can take many other parameters besides. By default it will print headers ...


2

awk 'FNR==1{f+=1;w++;} f==1{if(length>w) w=length; next;} f==2{printf("%-"w"s",$0); getline<f2; print;} ' f2=file2 file1 file1 Note: file1 is quite intentionally read twice; the first time is to find the maximum line length, and the second time is to format each line for the final concatenation with corresponding lines from file2. — ...


7

You seem to need column: paste file1.txt file2.txt | column -tc2 which creates this output: hi 1 wonderful 2 amazing 3 sorry 4 superman 5 superhumanwith 6 loss 7 You can of course also write your own script to do the formatting. Here is one way using awk: awk ' NR==FNR { a[FNR] = $0 ; if ...


3

If you insist on doing it with awk: awk -v file=file2.txt '{ cnt++ a[cnt] = $0 getline b[cnt] <file if(length(a[cnt]) > max) max = length(a[cnt]) } END { max++ for(i = 1; i <= cnt; i++) printf "%-" max "s%s\n", a[i], b[i] }' file1.txt On a side note: I'm pretty ...


1

In Perl: $ perl -lne 'if(/_sg/){print "$n\n$s" if defined($n); $n=$_; $s=0;} else{$s+=$_}END{print "$n\n$s"}' file Lillypaul_sg 614409 Ammy_sg 3 ramaswamy_sg 36 tommy_sg 137480 If you want the numbers to be 0-padded if they're less than 6 digits (as in your original question): $ perl -lne 'if(/_sg/){printf "%s\n%0.6d\n",$n,$s if ...


3

awk '$0 == $0+0{ summ += $0 next} { if(summ) format="%06d\n%s\n" else format="%s%s\n" printf format, summ, $0 summ=""} END { if(summ) printf "%06d\n", summ}' ...


2

Using awk $ awk '/}/{next;} /Name:/{print;n=NR+10} NR>n' file Name: john Apple orange grape pine Name: Ruben grape zebra donkey Name: Tom Tiger red blue orange tomato cat How it works /}/{next;} Skip over any line containing }. /Name:/{print;n=NR+10} When we reach a line containing Name:, print it and, so we know when to start printing again, set n ...


2

creating a new pool At this point, four labels (two at the beginning and two in the end of LUN) was overwritten by ZFS. This is strange because usually zpool detects older labels and they may only be overwritten by using -f option (force). Does anyone know of any further recovery procedures? Not sure if they are. You'll need at least one alive ...


0

You might want to use nl for this, too. It comes to my mind because when I do stuff like that I often find it useful to retain the original line-numbers. eval "nl -ba -s'$(printf "\n\n\n\n\n'")" <infile Also pr is spec'd for the -doublespace argument - which will double all newlines in input on output. But sed's good, too.


0

Another one , with printf cat file.txt | xargs printf "%s\n\n\n\n\n" To output that to a file (cat file.txt | xargs printf "%s\n\n\n\n\n") > out.txt


7

That's the job for sed: sed -e 'G;G;G;G;G' file With awk: nawk -vORS='\n\n\n\n\n\n' 1 file Or shorter version: awk 'ORS="\n\n\n\n\n\n"' file or avoid setting ORS for each input line: awk 'BEGIN{ORS="\n\n\n\n\n\n"};1' file


1

in Solaris 11 SRU is about the best equivalent to Cluster/Jumbo Patch. So you could run: # pkg info entire | grep Summary Summary: entire incorporation including Support Repository Update (Oracle Solaris 11.2.8.4.0). Or to clean it up a bit: # pkg info entire | grep Summary | sed 's/.*[\(]\(.*\)[\)]./\1/' | awk '{print $NF}' 11.2.8.4.0 Gerry ...



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