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If your version of awk supports regular expressions as the field separator, you can do this: $ awk -F'[/.]' '{print $5}' oratab 11 9 alternatively, if you want the dbname printed too: $ awk -F'[:/.]' '{print $1,$6}' oratab dbname1 11 dbname2 9 I'm not sure if the Solaris or AIX versions of awk supports regexps as field separator. GNU awk does. So ...


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Had some time to look into this. Perhaps could you share your Solaris version? I have tried this on a Solaris 11.3 system: # pkg list entire NAME (PUBLISHER) VERSION IFO entire 0.5.11-0.175.3.1.0.5.0 i-- # zfs set groupquota@staff=2G ...


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Depends upon which unix/linux you are using, you would need to install "curl" package. If it supports rpm, install curl rpm after downloading from any rpm repositories (e.g. http://rpmfusion.org/ ) or setup yum. If its debian based try getting debian based package using apt-get etc. Note: download and install only those packages which are compatible to ...


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Several ways to do that. You can simply use dd, like : dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/null Or there are other tools like stress : stress --cpu 2 --timeout 60 The above will stress two cores for 60 seconds. Or you can also use an endless while loop : while true; do true; done Another possibility is this fork bomb - careful with this as it might even ...


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It's been a long time since I last used sendmail on Solaris but I'm sure its -v flag will show what's going on: ( echo 'From: me@example.net' echo 'To: you@contoso.com' echo 'Subject: from me to you' echo finger ) | sendmail -t -v I'm also pretty sure that mailx passes this flag onwards: echo hello, world | mailx -v -s "mail subject" ...


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Here's a slightly improved version of your script. It uses $(pwd) rather than back-ticks, single-quotes around literal strings (the From and To addresses, and the subject string), double-quotes where variable interpolation is needed, and uses a heredoc for the headers rather than multiple echo lines. I like to use the string __EOF__ to delimit heredocs ...


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There is not -- unless you manually put it into the EEPROM using sneep: Oracle Serial Number in EEPROM (SNEEP) provides a software-accessible Chassis Serial Number (CSN) for all Oracle Solaris hardware platforms. SNEEP uses the system EEPROM for persistent storage of the Chassis Serial Number and other important user-defined data such as asset ...


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Login to ALOM and do the following and run the below command. sc> showplatform SUNW,SPARC-Enterprise-T5120 Chassis Serial Number: BEL00011GA


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The physmem value from the system_pages statistics will give you the number of pages the OS sees. You need to multiply this number by the default page size which can be 4K or 8K depending on your architecture: $ kstat -n system_pages -p -s physmem | nawk -v pagesize=$(pagesize) '{print $2*pagesize/1024/1024 "MB"}' 4017.64MB Note that this might not ...


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There's also lgrpinfo (man page): Description lgrpinfo prints information about the locality group (lgroup) hierarchy and its contents. An lgroup represents the set of CPU and memory-like hardware devices that are at most some distance (latency) apart from each other. All lgroups in the system are identified by a unique integer called an ...


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You might be able to use: echo "::memstat" |mdb -k


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Do you have either swap or mdb? Maybe kstat :::physmem, which should give you the number of pages. (8K on SPARC, 4K on x86 in most situations)


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Solaris isn't fundamentally different from other *nix's. Moreover, looking at bash -t won't give you useful information in all cases. Have you tried last?



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