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4

mount -p will show you the file system type used for each mounted file system, eg: $ mount -p rpool/ROOT/solaris - / zfs - no /devices - /devices devfs - no /dev - /dev dev - no ctfs - /system/contract ctfs - no proc - /proc proc - no mnttab - /etc/mnttab mntfs - no ... Unless you are currently using a bootable DVD or USB thumbdrive (i.e. you are in ...


3

The OpenSolaris distro identified itself in /etc/release, as did Solaris Express - neither has existed or been supported in years though, so checking for them is not really relevant today. Also, only a development version of SunOS 5.11 was ever released as OpenSolaris - if uname reports SunOS 5.10, it is the Solaris 10 release that predates OpenSolaris. ...


2

On the RHEL machine, try: ssh -o GSSAPIAuthentication=no zabbix@172.18.xxx.xx If that works, make it permanent by editing ~/.ssh/config and add: GSSAPIAuthentication no Also, check that the RHEL is visible in DNS (from the server's point of view). The server tries to check your reverse DNS resolution. If that fails, you'll suffer a delay. This check ...


2

One way would be to use a while loop that runs zlogin <zone> svcs -xv or zlogin <zone> svcs svc:/milestone/multi-user | grep online and uses the output from one of those commands to determine whether the zone is ready, or whether to sleep a little longer. The second command might be better if you regularly have failed services that need ...


2

OK, found it. That now makes sense. the behaviour is Nexenta-specific and explained at http://lwn.net/Articles/334756/ GNU and not GNU The default behavior of Nexenta is to prefer GNU utilities, which are installed in /usr/bin and /usr/sbin and so on. The Sun versions of these utilities are installed in /usr/sun/bin and /usr/sun/sbin. Nexenta uses ...


2

In any case, sed "0,/^local/{s/md5/trust/}" Is GNU specific (the 0 address and the missing ; before }) and won't work with any other sed implementation (and Solaris doesn't ship with GNU sed by default). Portably/standardly: sed '/^local/,$!s/md5/trust/' to replace only on the lines up to (but not included) the first one starting with local. Or: awk ...


1

Your swap area is highly undersized. A large part of the RAM reported to be free is in fact currently unusable because it serves as a backing store to other programs memory reservations. Just add some swap, it can be a simple file, and you'll be able to launch your JVM.


1

You can have available RAM but still run out of swap. I believe this could be what you are experiencing. Investigate with swap -s. As a second idea the problem may be due to the fact that there isn't enough contiguous memory available although it would seem fairly odd if the OS cannot find 10 GB contiguous free memory when there seems to >100 GB free.


1

Solaris 10's default MANPATH is /usr/share/man. You can add values to it: MANPATH="/usr/share/man:/opt/sfw/man" See the man page for more information. Solaris 11's default MANPATH is derived from PATH, so you wouldn't need to set the environment variable.


1

I have tested moving this script from /etc/rc0.d to /etc/rcS.d, /etc/rc1.d, /etc/rc2.d and /etc/rc3.d with the following results: /etc/rcS.d - same behaviour as /etc/rc0.d - /etc/DR_Network_Configured is created, but no reboot occurs. /etc/rc1.d - /etc/DR_Network_Configured is not created, and no reboot happens. /etc/rc2.d - /etc/DR_Network_Configured is ...



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