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When a drive is kicked from a RAID array, its metadata is no longer updated. So the drive that still sees all drives as AAAA is usually the one that was kicked first. The update time might reflect that as well. So I assume the RAID layer first kicked sdh (when 4 drives were active), then sdi (with 3 drives), sdj (two drives), and that leaves sdg alone with ...


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What I ended up doing was using mknod like @derobert suggested to create the devices that mdadm was looking for. I tried the major/minor numbers mdadm was telling me it couldn't find with the different drive letters I was trying to remove until it worked. mknod /dev/sde1 b 8 17 Then I had to use the --force option to get it remove the component. mdadm ...


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It's because the device nodes no longer exist on your system (probably udev removed them when the drive died). You should be able to remove them by using the keyword failed or detached instead: mdadm -r /dev/md0 failed # all failed devices mdadm -r /dev/md0 detached # failed ones that aren't in /dev anymore If your version of mdadm is too old to do ...


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The minimal required grub.cfg is the following : set timeout=1 set root='mduuid/ce16c757e4752e4fa9a2fd4935df1aef' menuentry 'Arch Linux' { linux /boot/vmlinuz-linux root=UUID=05dddf23-1d9f-417e-b3f8-2281a328dc0b rw initrd /boot/initramfs-linux.img } Yes, quite a bit different from the long stream of garbage that gets generated by grub-mkconfig, and as ...


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Since you've partitioned your RAID as if it was a single disk, you can ignore the RAID altogether in this case. So it's merely a problem of resizing / shifting partitions. So for example, you could shrink the www partition, delete the swap and then shift the root partition to the left in order to grow it. Or, if that seems to complicated and you don't ...



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