New answers tagged

1

One approach in this kind of situation is to perform a two-part install Install a minimal system on /dev/sda1. Include the RAID and LVM tools but as little as possible of everything else. Create a suitably sized partition on all of the remaining three disks for / (root). I'd suggest 50GB if you've got space to spare. Use the RAID tools to create a ...


1

Could be late, but was digging in the same problem and found the topic. Hope this will be usefull for someone too. Working excellent in Ubuntu 14.04: sudo -i mdadm --assemble --scan You will get: mdadm: /dev/md/1 has been started with 1 drive (out of 2) Then mount and see your files: cd /mnt && mkdir to-restore-md1 && mount /dev/md1 ...


0

In theory, yes: you can create a custom write-intent bitmap, or tell mdadm to assemble an array from only the beginnings of the disks, or probably some tricks I haven't thought of. In practice, trying to do so carries a high risk of data loss: you're bypassing the system's safeguards, so it can't protect you from getting your disks mixed up, or incorrectly ...


4

RAID always needs a device (at least if you use md). There are two ways. The probably better one is to use a network block device: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Network_block_device You can tell md to use such a device for writing only (because it's too slow for reading) with mdadm ... --write-mostly. The other option is to create a file on a network ...


1

A volume is called a "LUKS volume" because it has a LUKS header. Thus if you convert a non-LUKS volume into a LUKS volume then you do get an additional header and do lose data space. The LUKS header can be on a differenct device (--header) but I do not know whether cryptsetup-reencrypt supports that. But most probably you want to have the LUKS header within ...



Top 50 recent answers are included