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1

The instructions you cited said to do this: wget http://www.eng.lsu.edu/mirrors/apache/maven/maven-3/3.2.3/binaries/apache-maven-3.2.3-bin.zip unzip apache-maven-3.2.3-bin.zip mv apache-maven-3.2.3/ /opt/maven This will result in /opt/maven/bin, /opt/maven/lib, etc. What you did was slightly different: wget ...


1

[What is] the proper way to make a script globally available from the terminal, like a command One way would be to add the command to /usr/local/bin, and ensure that this single directory is in the PATH. If you have a complete application with several commands it wouldn't be unreasonable to add symlinks in /usr/local/bin pointing to the commands held ...


4

First, alternatives is from debian and will not work in redhat, freebsd or many other systems. Second, the standard recommendation is to use /usr/bin for vendor packages, /opt for third party packages, /usr/local/bin for local executables and set the path for user executables. alternatives is intended where you can have multiple packages provide the same ...


2

You should trust the actual Debian repos for this purpose. This is all about open source software and the community. There are thousands of companies and individuals that trust Debian with its data. If a package misbehaves on purpose (like someone injected a malicious code in there), it is very hard that this goes unnoticed. Even it gets past their testing ...


2

The file logstash-forwarder_linux_386 is an executable. It's ready to run, there's no unzipping to be done. You can see that with the file command: $ file logstash-forwarder_linux_386 logstash-forwarder_linux_386: ELF 32-bit LSB executable, Intel 80386, version 1 (SYSV), statically linked, not stripped You need to make this file executable and place it in ...


0

I formatted the deleted partition to ext4, then everything worked.


12

Gentoo is a Linux distribution that compiles packages from sources. Compiling packages requires much more space that installing pre-compiled binaries (that is, binaries that are compiled on the machines of the distribution maintainers). When you install something from the sources, you also need the sources for all the compilation dependencies. Almost all ...


15

User accounts are used not only for actual, human users, but also to run system services and sometimes as owners of system files. This is done because the separation between human users' resources (processes, files, etc.) and the separation between system services' resources requires the same mechanisms under the hood. The programs that you run normally run ...


1

On Linux when we install a service it creates a user of its service name or similar to that so that it can't access others files.


8

I presume you're finding this list of users by checking /etc/passwd? This is totally normal - 'users' serve to carry a set of permissions, useful for locking down not just 'actual users' but also programs to certain areas of your system and tracking what they changed (same concept with groups). I've inserted one of my Raspberry Pi /etc/passwd files below ...


3

It's all about risk mitigation; if make does something destructive, you can only lose whatever data was modifiable (or deletable) by the user running it. So you run make as a plain user to limit the scope to that user's files, and you run make install as root because you have to if you want to install to /usr/local typically. Note that in the example you ...


2

It comes down to trust vs convenience. True, make might be insecure, but then so might make install. It's just that the surface attack area should (hopefully) be smaller for make install, and it's more likely a quick perusal of the Makefile will spot anything strange. However, installing software into the $PATH is risky regardless of who has compiled it, so ...


4

You can use the make targets delete-old and delete-old-libs to remove obsolete files. They run interactively, unless you set BATCH_DELETE_OLD_FILES: # pwd /usr/src # make -DBATCH_DELETE_OLD_FILES delete-old Run them after make installworld. Have a look at build(7) for more details. A word of warning - be careful with delete-old-libs - it will delete ...


0

The package name is case-sensitive: you need to run sudo apt-get install sofware-center all in lower case. As far as Chrome is concerned, you can either install Chromium from the Ubuntu repositories (where it's called chromium-browser) or download Chrome from Google.


0

In our case, it was a firewall issue ... we were allowing our host outbound http (port 80) access, but not https (443). The regular repos are accessed via the former, but EPEL repos are via the latter. So w/o EPEL in the loop a 'yum update' (or whatever) was working fine, but w/ EPEL, it was bombing, ==> One of the configured repositories failed ...


0

This is how I fixed the issue. This will be help you For me this issues occur because of the IPV6 internet connection in the Fedora. So first we have to disable IPV6 totally. here what you have to do Open Terminal Type su and enter to log in as the super user Enter the root password Type cd /etc/modprobe.d/ to change directory to /etc/modprobe.d/ Type vi ...


0

Uninstall PHP5.3.3 and than install imagemagic. Read what yum is printing on screen (if it is not trying to install PHP5.3.3 again). P.S. I just read what have you really done. You have compiled PHP5.6 and it is out of package manager support. Why did you need PHP5.6? You can have PHP5.4 on CentOS without compiling anything.


1

It's possible, although it's not a good idea to mix package management systems... An Arch package is an xz-compressed tarball containing the package's files and some meta-data, stored in .PKGINFO, .INSTALL and .MTREE. To extract a package, simply run tar xf on it in a temporary directory; if you then decide you want to install the contents you can move them ...


0

This worked for me on Fedora 21 (x64): rpm -Uvh iscan-2.30.1-1.usb0.1.ltdl3.x86_64.rpm --nodeps ln -s /usr/lib64/libltdl.so.7 /usr/lib64/libltdl.so.3 iscan seems to work fine with the newer library


1

If you add the file to /usr/share/bash-completion/ it will be overwritten by pacman when the package is next updated. To prevent this from happening, use ~/.bash_completion, which is sourced at the end of the main completion script. From the FAQ: Q. How can I insert my own local completions without having to reinsert them every time you issue a new ...


1

This issue annoyed the living daylinghts out of me earlier today since the update to the latest CentOS 7 release requires re-accepting the EULA, and the text interface for accepting the license is unintuitive to the point of being broken. (Also - EULA on Linux? Seriously guys, WTF?!). Simple fix to make this go away permanently: 1) Interrupt grub (press e) ...


0

A desktop environment is just a set of bits like anything else you run on a computer - you can download your environment to a USB stick or DVD/CD - whatever. Download the .rpm or .deb and put it anywhere you want. One thing I would say is that you should be more concerned about your machine resources than looking like Windows. The basics are identical for ...


0

Recommendations are personal and liable to become out of date. That said, I would not disagree with your idea of Linux Mint Cinnamon - this is probably the prettiest (most elegant-looking) Linux distro at the moment. But whichever distro you select, I suggest you try it first in a virtual machine. You can download Virtual Box and then download a Cinnamon ...


0

You have used alien to transform the package format from .rpm to .deb. In the most cases that tool works flawless. But rarely it fails building an installable package. Especially if there are some install or config-scripts included in the .rpm package (which are like the pre and post install/remove scripts in a .deb package). You didn't tell, whether there ...


0

On a current CentOS 7 minimal install you need: sudo yum install gcc kernel-devel-$(uname -r)


1

In your script use rpm -q packagename: if rpm -q vim-enhanced then ... else ... fi


1

I recommend you go though OpenVPN HOWTO, it will get you started in no time, except installing. For install on CentOS I'll do: install EPEL repo with yum install epel-release install openvpn server with yum install openvpn


2

You can try: #yum list installed | grep tmux tmux.x86_64 1.9a-5.fc21 @updates or: #yum list installed tmux Loaded plugins: langpacks Installed Packages tmux.x86_64 1.9a-5.fc21 @updates ...


1

OpenVPN is an ordinary Unix daemon, you can run it just fine from the command line. Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux (EPEL) contains an OpenVPN package you can install. You'll then have to write (or copy over) a config file, certificates, etc.



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