Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

apt-get (like all other APT-based software: aptitude, synaptic, etc.) looks for packages in the places mentioned in the file /etc/apt/sources.list. In addition, files in the directory /etc/apt/sources.list.d are used (if their name isn't too “weird”). Edit the file /etc/apt/sources.list to remove or comment out the line refering to the Debian CD. To comment ...


6

Well, your distribution has TeX Live packages, so you could use those: sudo apt-get install texlive If you don't want to do that, see https://www.tug.org/texlive/debian.html, specifically the section "Integrating vanilla TeX Live with Debian". The issue is that since you installed TeX Live locally, the Debian package management system doesn't know TeX is ...


5

When you press Ctrl+C, the process (technically, the process group) that is running in your terminal is killed. You can't resurrect it. All you can do is run it again. Running make involves a lot of steps that each compile a single file, or link some files, or run one test, etc. When you press Ctrl+C, the current step is cancelled, but the data from all the ...


3

Cabal installs the new cabal version under /home/user/.cabal/bin Thus, you either have to directly call /home/user/.cabal/bin/cabal or add /home/user/.cabal/bin to your path. /usr/bin/cabal is the version packaged by Debian.


2

I'd personally make no assumption on sudo, just as putting sudo in a script is a bad idea. Your fourth suggestion (check whether the script runs as root) is best, IMHO. Just that I prefer checking the effective user ID instead of its name: [ -n "$EUID" ] && [ $EUID -eq 0 ] || <not root, exit> This will leave the choice to the user, which ...


2

To check whether a library is installed correctly, you'd usually try building a program using it. make check runs tests in the build tree, not on the installed files. In your case they passed, which is good, but it's not sufficient to ensure you'll be able to build software using FFTW. The presence of the files you list in /usr/local/lib indicates that ...


1

There is a 'goldendict' package that is part of EPEL. Enable EPEL by installing the 'epel-release' package, then 'goldendict' will be available to install through yum.


1

Fedora 12 is a bit old but I think you can still do the following: Look in /var/log/secure which has lines for each use of sudo. For example, you might find: Aug 11 15:16:37 home sudo: user : TTY=pts/2 ; PWD=/home/user ; \ USER=root ; COMMAND=/bin/rpm -i /home/user/mypackage.rpm List all the installation times of the rpms with: rpm -qa --qf '%{name} ...


1

You are running a Windows version of Krita on Mint. You need to install the native version of Krita. Use Synaptic or apt-get to install it. Krita runs fine on Mint if you use the native version.


1

There are as many opinions as there are people. I think the best way to create tomcat user to do as follows: # useradd -r -s /sbin/nologin tomcat # chown -R tomcat: /usr/local/tomcat It means, you will create system account. Info from man useradd: System users will be created with no aging information in /etc/shadow, and their numeric identifiers are ...


1

The /usr/local and /opt directories are typically used for the installation of local programs system-wide. Typically you can either put the new binaries in /usr/local/bin or symlink them there so that they're still in the default user $PATH (so they can just run program without specifying the exact path).


1

As with all questions like this, the answer is to write a PKGBUILD for the package yourself (after you are done, consider putting it on the AUR to make other folks' lives easier :D). Note, you should not ever manually install programs on Arch (or really any distribution with a package manager unless you are willing to deal with manually updating that ...


1

Related: Where should Steam install game data on linux, to be FHS-compliant? I also recommend /opt, many vendors release their software regarding dirs in /opt as the default installation destination - /opt/google/chrome, /opt/Xilinx/Vivado, etc. Of course it would be nice if local administrators would have an option to change that path.


1

The version of debootstrap in Ubuntu 12.04 is too old, it doesn't support Jessie. Support for Jessie was added in version 1.0.49. You can upgrade to a newer version of debootstrap manually by downloading it from https://launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/debootstrap; its dependencies are trivial and should be OK in Ubuntu 12.04.


1

To expand on user1794469's converted comment, since Kali is based on Debian, you can add a PPA containing a newer version of python. Follow these steps: sudo apt-get install -y python-software-properties sudo add-apt-repository -y ppa:fkrull/deadsnakes sudo add-apt-repository ppa:fkrull/deadsnakes sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y python3.3 ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible