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4

You can use the make targets delete-old and delete-old-libs to remove obsolete files. They run interactively, unless you set BATCH_DELETE_OLD_FILES: # pwd /usr/src # make -DBATCH_DELETE_OLD_FILES delete-old Run them after make installworld. Have a look at build(7) for more details. A word of warning - be careful with delete-old-libs - it will delete ...


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It's all about risk mitigation; if make does something destructive, you can only lose whatever data was modifiable (or deletable) by the user running it. So you run make as a plain user to limit the scope to that user's files, and you run make install as root because you have to if you want to install to /usr/local typically. Note that in the example you ...


2

It comes down to trust vs convenience. True, make might be insecure, but then so might make install. It's just that the surface attack area should (hopefully) be smaller for make install, and it's more likely a quick perusal of the Makefile will spot anything strange. However, installing software into the $PATH is risky regardless of who has compiled it, so ...


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You can try: #yum list installed | grep tmux tmux.x86_64 1.9a-5.fc21 @updates or: #yum list installed tmux Loaded plugins: langpacks Installed Packages tmux.x86_64 1.9a-5.fc21 @updates ...


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It's possible, although it's not a good idea to mix package management systems... An Arch package is an xz-compressed tarball containing the package's files and some meta-data, stored in .PKGINFO, .INSTALL and .MTREE. To extract a package, simply run tar xf on it in a temporary directory; if you then decide you want to install the contents you can move them ...


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If you add the file to /usr/share/bash-completion/ it will be overwritten by pacman when the package is next updated. To prevent this from happening, use ~/.bash_completion, which is sourced at the end of the main completion script. From the FAQ: Q. How can I insert my own local completions without having to reinsert them every time you issue a new ...


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In your script use rpm -q packagename: if rpm -q vim-enhanced then ... else ... fi


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I recommend you go though OpenVPN HOWTO, it will get you started in no time, except installing. For install on CentOS I'll do: install EPEL repo with yum install epel-release install openvpn server with yum install openvpn


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OpenVPN is an ordinary Unix daemon, you can run it just fine from the command line. Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux (EPEL) contains an OpenVPN package you can install. You'll then have to write (or copy over) a config file, certificates, etc.


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This issue annoyed the living daylinghts out of me earlier today since the update to the latest CentOS 7 release requires re-accepting the EULA, and the text interface for accepting the license is unintuitive to the point of being broken. (Also - EULA on Linux? Seriously guys, WTF?!). Simple fix to make this go away permanently: 1) Interrupt grub (press e) ...


1

This code works on Debian Distro. First of all download or locate your bz2 file. example: cd /desktop/yourfile_here tar -xvjf yourfile cd ./directory_created ./configure sudo make sudo make install



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