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4

The installation of a Unix program consists of roughly two parts. 1) Putting the files in suitable locations 2) Setting file permissions and ownerships suitably With regard to the first, the Linux File Hierarchy Standard is relevant. This is Linux specific, but largely follows historically codified Unix rules. Specifically, binaries intended to be run by ...


3

It could be that stardict-2.0.0-pre2.tar.gz and stardict-2.0.0.tar.gz are just not functional. I attempted to install both on CentOS 5.6 without success. The INSTALL and README are indeed empty on the pre2.tar.gz version. Unless you specifically need this version I recommend installing stardict-2.4.8.tar.bz2 instead. wget ...


3

You need to use clang++. clang is the C compiler, clang++ is the C++ compiler. Like gcc. I think these are basically the same compiler under the hood, but (again like gcc), clang++ links against the C++ libraries by default, while clang doesn't. Hence the linker errors.


2

You are looking for apt-cache policy output: ➜ ~ apt-cache policy skype skype:i386: Installed: 4.3.0.37-1 Candidate: 4.3.0.37-1 Version table: *** 4.3.0.37-1 0 100 /var/lib/dpkg/status ➜ ~ apt-cache policy irssi irssi: Installed: 0.8.17-1 Candidate: 0.8.17-1 Version table: *** 0.8.17-1 0 900 http://http.debian.net/debian/ ...


2

Use rpm rpm -ivh package.rpm If you want to install it on different place use: rpm -ivh -r /new/path package.rpm but be aware under new root will be recreated the directory structure from package


2

Installing a program is done by the operating system's package manager. So depends on the OS (Linux is the kernel). E.g. Debian is a Gnu/Linux, it used apt to install deb packages. Redhat, suse, Freebsd. etc use different package managers. In essence they will copy files to where they need to be (somewhere that normal users can not change), and set ...


2

-l is one of the options of dpkg-query, which has another option, -W (or --show). -W allows use to select an output format. You can try: dpkg-query --showformat '${Status}\t${Package}\t${Version}\t${Architecture}\t${Origin}\t${Section}\n' -W | column -ts $'\t' For example: $ dpkg-query --showformat ...


2

First of all: this is your computer, so you can do anything with it that you want, so the commands to move it there are at the end of this rant. ;-) However, the application is exactly where it's supposed to be according to the File Hierarchy Standard and other applications that depend on this one will expect it there. And it doesn't matter whether you're ...


1

./configure runs a script named "configure" in the current directory. make runs the program "make" in your path, and make install runs it again with the argument "install". Generally, the "configure" script was generated by a collection of programs known as "autotools". It checks your system and tries to generate a makefile (see below) appropriate for your ...


1

As well as apt-cache policy, described in Braiam's answer, you can use apt-show-versions and apt-forktracer. apt-show-versions by default will list all installed packages with the suite they come from, their version and whether they can be upgraded; for example afl:amd64/experimental *manually* upgradeable from 1.28b-1 to 1.36b-1 agedu:amd64/testing 9723-1 ...


1

I'm betting the program you're trying to run requires a newer version of GLIBC than is current installed on your system. Unfortunately, because it is GLIBC, there is no way to get a newer version without having root access and without affecting the entire system. Check the program's upstream site, make sure it's supported on RHEL 6.


1

Apt action track sorted by time|date can be found in log-file /var/log/apt/history.log where noted all your action with packets wherever you install, remove or update. For example one operation tracked similar to: Start-Date: 2015-02-13 01:15:14 Commandline: apt-get install sylfilter Install: libsylfilter0:amd64 (0.8-2, automatic), ...


1

nvm command is a shell function declared in ~/.nvm/nvm.sh. You may source either of following scripts at the start of yours to make nvm() available: . ~/.nvm/nvm.sh . ~/.profile . ~/.bashrc


1

Well, it is not terribly difficult to work in an init feature into a shell function. For example: fn(){ echo first time called\! fn(){ echo not the first time called\! } } fn; fn; fn ...will print... first time called! not the first time called! not the first time called! You can also define shell aliases in a function, or source ...


1

I found myself putting together pieces from the different answers, particularly Braiam's and muru's. In the end, I ended up with this oneliner, which gets me close enough to a start that I should be able to figure out the rest: dpkg-query --showformat '${Package}\n' -W | \ while read package; do \ apt-cache policy $package | grep -q wheezy/non-free ...


1

Since Scientific Linux is based on RHEL, you can try to install Chrome using this manual. There's a script that automatically download and install latest Google Chrome browser by picking libraries from a more recent released distro and put those libraries in (/opt/google/chrome/lib) directory and then you can able to run Google Chrome. To use it run: # ...


1

libbpg depends on version 1.6 of the PNG library, which you cannot install with apt-get on Linux Mint 17. This library is incompatible with libpng12 and needs to be installed from source (I used version 1.6.16) The additional complication is that if you install PNG 1.6 the make of libbpg still uses libpng12-dev even if you configure PNG 1.6 with configure ...


1

I had the same problem and fixed it by changing https to simple http. It is not a perfect solution, but might be a decent workaround depending on your security needs.


1

Try this, its works for me : Add new repo in /etc/apt/sources.list: deb http://repo.linrunner.de/debian wheezy main sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install tlp tlp-rdw Hope this will work for you.



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