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6

When you use apt to install a package, internally it uses the dpkg . When you install a package using apt it first create list of all the dependencies and download it from the repository. Once download is finished it use calls dpkg to install all those files satisfying all the dependencies. So if you have a .deb file: You can install it using dpkg -i ...


3

From your output: Not a compatible architecture: x86_64 Your options are to download and install a 32-bit version, if that is available. Or install this version on a 64-bit operating system. It is sometimes possible to run 32-bit software on a 64-bit processor, but not the opposite.


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The best place to install additional software packages in linux is /opt/. So create a directory for MatLab there and install it. # mkdir /opt/matlab # mount -o ro,loop ./R2014a_UNIX.iso /media/cdrom # /media/cdrom/install # umount /media/cdrom As your installer is in the form of an ISO image, mount it in /media/cdrom. I hope the installer ...


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That error (likely) means you are trying to run a 32-bit executable on a 64-bit system. I'll answer the specific issue here, but see the bottom of the answer for the better approach in general. You say have yum around, so this may help you: yum install lib/ld-linux.so.2 yum will try to find anything that provides that file and then install it. It should ...


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This line # mount -o ro,loop ./R2014a_UNIX.iso /mnt/matlab mounts the filesystem contained in the CD / DVD image R2014a_UNIX.iso at '/mnt/matlab', using the loop device. It doesn't actually copy the data from the .iso image file into the '/mnt/matlab' directory. When a process attempts to access the files that appear to be inside the '/mnt/matlab' ...


2

No it's not just a user preference. You can see if there's a package available that provides clang using the package management tool YUM. $ yum search clang Loaded plugins: auto-update-debuginfo, changelog, langpacks, refresh-packagekit =============================== N/S matched: clang ============================ clang-devel.i686 : Header files for clang ...


2

As mentioned in my comment, docker would work very well for this. The downside to it is that it eats a lot of disk space. Aside from disk space, there's no other overhead, not even CPU or memory. In a nutshell, docker essentially sets up a chroot inside a full OS image. So you end up running another distro inside your own. Docker is simply responsible for ...


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The problem is with nss old versions. It cannot talk with Fedora site via curl and use old nss library. Just update your nss version to the latest, it solves the problem with the EPEL repo update: $ sudo yum clean all $ sudo yum --disablerepo="epel" update nss This version of nss-3.14.3-4.el6_4.x86_64 works fine with the EPEL repository.


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Yes, you can do that. It's more work than relying on a package manager — the main attraction of “portable” installations under Windows is not to have to fight the lack of a decent package manager. You'll need to arrange for the programs to find their dependencies: data files, libraries, etc. Many programs support environment variables for that. Some check ...


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Don't Use a Source Package on a Binary Distribution !!! This will lead to unforeseen issues such as: The compiled programs expect the Binaries it uses to be in one place and Ubuntu installs them somewhere differently. Missing Symlinks to Libraries. Mismatched versions. etc. Instead use the official Wine PPA. Open the Software Sources menu by launching ...


2

The only possible scenario in your case is to compare compilation time of the same package with other, similar hardware. We know nothing about your hardware, but just to give you rough idea -- I have a netbook at hand (intel atom CPU, old and weak machine) with gentoo, so I can easily calculate compilation time for all wine packages in last 3 years: $ qlop ...


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One way to treat this problem consistently is using the modules package. It works by changing environmental variables (e.g. the paths to your binaries). The Environment Modules package provides for the dynamic modification of a user's environment via modulefiles. Modules can be loaded and unloaded dynamically and atomically, in an clean fashion e.g. ...


2

Some specific software can be configured with --program-suffix=-my-version-suffix. You may need to customize some of the other directories, but if you leave the --prefix to the default (/usr/local), that won't collide with the distro-packaged one in /usr. In the general case however, the only distro that attempts to allow coinstallation of arbitrary ...


2

Use dpkg -S to detect whether a particular path is managed by dpkg or not. Some exceptions are: anything under /var/, /etc/, /run/, or /boot (which often contain generated files), and anything that is a symlink to something in /etc/alternatives/ Applications that don't follow standards are expected to be installed under /opt, regardless of whether they're ...


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Install your foo.deb file with dpkg -i foo.deb. If there are some errors with unresolved dependencies, run apt-get install -f afterwards.


2

This works as expected out of the box on my system. You don't seem to have your sudo configured to allow you to run graphical applications. I haven't encountered this issue in quite a few years but one of these should work: Switch off access control for X xhost + sudo ./qt-opensource-linux-x64-1.6.0-5-online.run Then, activate it again with xhost -. ...


1

No there is normally no reason not to install as root, this is quite common. No "running" as root is not the same as installing as root. You should not run this as root, it is in my experience very seldom that an X client needs to be run as root. Installing and running are different things. Many items need to be installed as root to get into the directories ...


1

Bash patches are cumulative, the source for 4.3 is effectively 4.3.0, the patches are separate, and all of them should be applied in order, each one will bump you up a patch level. Rarely, a complete source release is made available from the official site, the last one was 3.2.48. What you are observing is that the required patch (the "-030" suffix ...


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Most of packages that doesn't comes with their man pages in the binary packages (in Debian based distros), instead use a package with the -doc suffix. In the case of OpenJDK, depending the version it could be openjdk-8-doc or openjdk-7-doc. If you install the default-jdk or default-jre metapackage, you can use the default-jdk-doc to use the default ...


1

echo "install firefox" Will echo, i.e., print to the same console, install firefox. You could put anything there, e.g., echo "fire missiles" will print fire missiles. But even if you have some, they still won't be fired ;) && export PS1= The && waits for the previous command to succeed, which it will. export means to set a shell ...


1

Check the dependencies with dpkg -I my.deb and apt-get install the dependencies before dpkg -i my.deb. May be you can copy the my.deb in /var/cache/apt/archives and install it directly with apt-get but I never tried. Doesn't work, apt-get and dpkg are looking for packages listed in archives.


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Measure GCC Compile Time $> time ./configure $> time make depend $> time make $> time make install The time utility provides statistics on compile time for your system. After you build with the time measurement utility, you can check the size of your directory with: Measure Build Size $> DIRECTORY="/source/compiler/output/directory" ...


1

First, remove wine $> apt-get remove wine Second, install Wine dependency packages (This script contains a manifest of wine dependencies.) Third, build wine from source $> ./configure $> make depend $> make $> make install Fourth, install WineTricks (This package contains enhanced tricks for Windows emulation.)


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Suggestion #1 I don't think you can run an XTERM like this since the RPM when being installed is run under a different userid (root) than the use that owns the desktop. For this to work, at a minimum, you'd need to perform a xhost + on your primary desktop as your userid, and then be sure to set the $DISPLAY environment variable in that call to XTERM. ...


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If you don't keep the deb file, it means that if you want to reinstall the package in the future (for example, because you uninstalled it by accident) you will have to repeat the whole process, i.e. compile from source and create the package. You must decide whether saving space is more important to you than pontentially saving time in the future. The ...


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You should be able to pass it --install=no to get the desired behaviour.


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You should be able to copy the ISO directly to a usb flash drive and set your computer to boot first from usb (usually F12 when the computer is first booting). According to the official debian site, you can just copy to usb and install that way, so long as you already have a linux system running. If you don't have an existing linux OS already running, or ...



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