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11

To install to a custom directory, use this: ./configure --prefix=/desired/path make sudo make install By default, programs installed without the added prefix will be located in /usr/local/bin. To verify this, you can type which program_name after installation. If you install your program in a custom directory, it will be installed in /desired/path/bin. ...


5

With your prefix you will need to run something like /usr/local/openssl/bin/openssl. If you don't want to type the full pathname then you can add the /usr/local/openssl/bin directory to your PATH, or you can symlink the openssl command into /usr/local/bin (assuming that's on your PATH). e.g. sudo ln -s /usr/local/openssl/bin/openssl /usr/local/bin


4

Update your PATH to include /home/myDirectory/myCMakeDirectory/bin before the default directories. In sh shells: PATH="/home/myDirectory/myCMakeDirectory/bin:$PATH" This would go in your shell init scripts (.bashrc for example). I would also recommend using GNU Stow for private software installations from source, and to do them with prefix $HOME/local/...


3

My recommendation is to NOT follow the install instructions on the Go language web site. Instead, install the packages for your distribution. Debian, for example has golang 1.6.1 packaged, along with hundreds of Go libraries. Ubuntu has 1.6.1 too. http://packages.ubuntu.com/xenial/devel/golang apt-get install golang will install the compiler, docs and ...


3

Your IP camera is embedded system. This means that it have so little resources available that it cannot even store "fat" bash binary on itself. It's probably has too little RAM too to store it on memory or the operating system inside it is locked down so you will not be able to store bash binary permanently on it. You need to find out how to receive ...


2

If you're looking for a package manager like Yum or APT, no there is not similar built-in package manager. Without using a package manager, you cannot download from the net - repositories. The only option you have is compile your code. But if you're looking for a package manager, I recommend you use either Homebrew or Mac Ports. I've worked with both, and ...


2

apt-get is part of the Debian (or Ubuntu, etc), package apt. Either you're not using one of those systems, or you haven't that package. OSX has an apt package (with MacPorts). It is not something that you are likely to have installed on your computer. You could install elinks with MacPorts or homebrew. But you will need a different tutorial. (In any ...


2

According to the FHS, /usr/local/ is meant for exactly that: The /usr/local hierarchy is for use by the system administrator when installing software locally. The alternative would be /opt: /opt is reserved for the installation of add-on application software packages. A package to be installed in /opt must locate its static files in a separate /...


2

Following the installation instructions is usually good practice. I think it sounds like quite a good idea to keep the Go stuff under /usr/local/go. That way you can easily remove the complete installation before updating it by just removing that directory hierarchy. Nothing stops you from putting it in /opt as /opt/go or in /sw or $HOME/local or wherever ...


2

If you want to update Python, why don't you use your distro's package manager? apt-get in the case of Debian. If you want to install a different version of python, it would be best to do that in a virtualenv. If you're installing a package you're building, usually it would be placed somewhere like /usr/local/bin. You'll find most of your currently ...


1

I would suggest using GNU Stow to create a hierarchy under the /opt directory for any site-specific software (see Filesystem Hierarchy Standard, although some sites use /sw instead). That way, your stuff would [using /opt] ... not collide with anything installed by any package manager. [using stow] ... be really easy to install/uninstall. For stow, ...



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