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If you need to save the intermediate file after the processing is done, then inter-process communication (such as through a pipe or socket) is not particularly valuable.  Similarly, if you need to run the two programs at vastly different times, you should just do it the way you're doing it now. Back when Unix was created, disks were very small, and it was ...


1

As soon as the listening nc (server) gets closed, the client nc quits as well. On Mac OS X you can open -a 'Activity Monitor' to verify that. The reason why the nc & cat example hangs is not nc but cat that continues to keep its stdin and stdout open for reading and writing. However, when cat tries to write to the pipe after the listening nc has been ...


3

Files are not just files on disk or in memory; they are streams of data, of which those are but two examples. Remote endpoints are a third example, and you interact with those using sockets.


10

The reason why TCP/IP sockets use file descriptors is that, when the sockets interface was first designed and implemented (in BSD Unix, in 1983), its designers felt that a network connection was analogous to a file - you can read, write, and close both, and that it would fit well with the Unix idea of "everything is a file". Other TCP/IP network stack ...


19

The limit on "open files" is not really just for files. It's a limit on the number of kernel handles a single process can use at one time. Historically, the only thing that programs would typically open a lot of were files, so this became known as a limit on the number of open files. There is a limit to help prevent processes from say, opening a lot of files ...



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