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14

The following website provides a tool that will translate markdown into HTML: http://daringfireball.net/projects/markdown/ Once you convert the file to HTML, there are a number of command line tools to use to view the file. Using a test file that contains markdown formatted-text, I found the following worked nicely. $ wget ...


5

I think all you need to do is run reset. If that doesn't help, look to see if you changed any files in /etc recently (e.g. find /etc -mtime -1) and read the unicode_start or consolechars man pages.


4

Finally I solved this problem by just comment out the following line in Makefile #ifndef NO_LIBPERL #PERL_EMBED_LDOPTS = `perl -MExtUtils::Embed -e ldopts 2>/dev/null` #PERL_EMBED_CCOPTS = `perl -MExtUtils::Embed -e ccopts 2>/dev/null` #endif It looked like MExtUtils::Embed generate wrong LDFLAGS for libperl I also found that slackware perl package ...


4

There's also Discount, David Parsons' C implementation of John Gruber's Markdown text to html language. Discount consists of several command-line tools including markdown, mkd2html, makepage, mktags and theme. http://www.pell.portland.or.us/~orc/Code/discount/ In addition, there's an implementation of markdown in C, using a PEG grammar. ...


3

I know you said you preferred a non-GUI application, but I am currently working on a GUI application called DownMarker which does this. You can find the source in a mercurial repository here. You can find a stand-alone executable to run with mono or .NET here. Caveat: It is far from finished and only occasionally tested on linux/mono. Last test I did was on ...


3

Apparently, it can be enabled/disabled using /proc/sys/kernel/sysrq if the kernel supports it, i.e., CONFIG_MAGIC_SYSRQ is enabled in the kernel config what should be the case for Slackware, according to this.


3

Have you tried the instructions on the official network config site? I think most of your starting configuration questions will be written here. By the way, if you really want to dive into Linux, don't go for Ubuntu cause you won't ever understand the core workflow of Linux systems. With slackware you will have a hard time learning how to do things, but if ...


3

You can use pip or easy_install to install python modules. $ pip install <package-name> Edit: I tried installing urllib2 package and it told me that the real name of requirement urllib2 is urllib3. Here is the what it happened: pradeep@pradeep-laptop:~$ sudo pip install urllib2 Downloading/unpacking urllib2 Real name of requirement urllib2 is ...


3

You need to reinstall GRUB, you can do this from a chroot. Boot into a live CD, chroot into your Linux system and issue grub-install. Something like the following should work (assuming /dev/sda2 is / and /dev/sda1 is /boot, and you want to install to the MBR on /dev/sda): mount /dev/sda2 /mnt mount /dev/sda1 /mnt/boot mount -t proc none /mnt/proc mount -o ...


3

The closest equivalent would be to run the xmodmap program each time you log in. Put the following snippet in a file called .Xmodmap in your home directory: keycode 66 = Return clear Lock You can see the key codes and current associated key names by running xev from a terminal. Press Caps Lock while the xev window is focused, and you'll see a something ...


3

Debian backports provides a package virtualbox-guest-dkms which could be an easy solution to your problem: http://packages.debian.org/de/squeeze-backports/virtualbox-guest-dkms If you install this package, then Debian should handle the dependency on the kernel headers automatically, and if it doesn't work, it should at least display a proper error message. ...


3

One way to do this is via the /sys/power interface. The usual way to induce hibernation (used by various higher level tools) is to write to a couple of the fields there: echo shutdown > /sys/power/disk echo disk > /sys/power/state I believe the first one sets the methodology and the second one triggers the change.1 However, if you read from these ...


2

Is a GUI program, but I find useful for this task ReText, that is an editor for Markdown and reStructuredText with a preview mode: However, if you need see the file of ReText from a terminal, one option could be convert the marddown to html with pandoc and see the html copy in lynx: pandoc file.mkd > file.html ; lynx file.html


2

Assuming you want to see what the html looks like: Use a web browser (with an addon) as a viewer. For example, for Google Chrome there's TextDown which also lets you edit files straight in the browser and see a live preview. After adding it, you also need to go to chrome://chrome/extensions/ and check "allow access to file URLs" so you can open local ...


2

To me /home partition is automatic for back-ups and ease of upgrading/installing new systems. You can even (usually) share your /home between differing OSes (doesn't apply now, but you never know). I keep it tidy (< USB drive size) so I can move it around easily. Other than that, I haven't noticed much benefit to partitioning other things for home PC ...


2

I can't answer your question, but you could use the llvm 2.9 Slackbuild from slackbuilds.org for Slackware 13.37 (general information, a howto on slackbuilds.org). I suppose that's the Slackware way (comparable to Arch's PKGBUILD, someone correct me if I'm wrong, please).


2

Slackware doesn't make a lot of changes to any given software. Apache httpd is installed right-out-of-the-box, so all you'd really have to do is: chmod +x /etc/rc.d/rc.httpd # Apache starts at boot apachectl start And then start filling in /srv/httpd/htdocs/ I should add that the Apache configuration file(s) appear in /etc/httpd/


2

This heavily depends on whether or not your router supports it. You do not need to disable DHCP, the DHCP reservations will need to be provided by your router and the router should have to set up a static standing reservation of the MAC address of the network interface to an IP address. Of course you don't have to and you can disable DHCP and set up a ...


2

It's the BCM4312 at 07:00.0. Note the "802.11" following.


2

This is probably an issue with your ALSA sound level settings. There are two main volume settings: PCM and Master. Usually only one of them is controlled via desktop GUI settings (you can select which one that is in your audio settings). If you run alsamixer in your terminal, check the volume levels for both of them. If you can't find the system setting to ...


2

Updating Slackware on a personal desktop machine is pretty harmless in my experience and there's always a step-by-step guide in UPGRADE.txt. Even if you temporarily break something, you'll learn the Slackware way by fixing it. (Sidenote: since Slackware-current is not in the "let's call this a tentative beta" stage yet by the latest -current changelog ...


2

If you want to do this upgrade, I'd upgrade to Slackware-13.37 first, using the hints in UPGRADE.txt, and then upgrade 13.37 to -current once that is complete. During each release cycle, several packages are added and removed, so to move from 13.37 to current in the second step, you should read the Changelog closely to see what steps you might need to take ...


2

I am not sure why the filesystem is being mounted read-only since you have specified rw. Perhaps the kernel is actually mounting the initrd image read-write instead, and then that initrd image mounts your root fs as read-only. In any case, typically the kernel is expected to mount the root fs read-only, and then at some point, init will remount it ...


2

Debugging this type of issue can be tricky. I would first start with trying to manually force it into suspend mode with the following command: PM_DEBUG=true pm-suspend Then check /var/log/pm-suspend.log for hints on what might be going wrong. Perhaps something is going wrong during suspend mode. Here's a good article on the Ubuntu wiki on how to debug ...


2

First of all, if you want to use the init scripts, you have to put the wireless configuration into /etc/rc.d/rc.inet1.conf (remember to leave it accessible only for root, since you'd leak the network password otherwise). However, unless this is a machine that for some reason uses the same wireless network all the time, you probably want something better ...


2

First of all you need to make sure whether Windows 8 can boot with Secure boot disabled. If so, then Supposing the system uses the UEFI partition for booting, all you should need is installing elilo (EFI-enabled LILO), which is shipped with Slackware. All it does is copying kernel to the EFI boot partition. If for some reason you need to use Secure boot, ...


2

Running ifconfig itself provides only a list of interfaces which are up, i.e. interfaces which are somehow already configured. To see all the interfaces use ifconfig -a or ip address show


2

You should be able to change that in Gnome's Control Center. Run gnome-control-center or choose settings from the menu. Then, go into the 'Mouse & Touchpad' section and switch to edge scrolling in the 'Touchpad' tab: If that doesn't work, you can try and set it manually. Edit or create the file /usr/lib/X11/xorg.conf.d/10-synaptics.conf and make it ...


2

wicd is included into Slackware official ISO file, so you don't need to compile it. Here's an installation's step by step: Download it, using wget: $ wget http://ftp.slackware.com/pub/slackware/slackware-14.1/extra/wicd/wicd-1.7.2.4-i486-4.txz Become superuser, type su in a terminal, i.e. xterm. $ su # And install it with installpkg. ...



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