Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

There doesn't seem to be a pure bash solution. Ksh (both ksh93 and mksh) unblock all signals (tested on Debian wheezy), so if you can use ksh instead of bash, it will solve your problem. If you can't change the fact that bash is invoked, you might be able to make bash execute ksh and make ksh execute the child process: replace bash -c '…; exec ...


0

You can stop and put your job in background while it's running using ctrl+z. Then you can kill your job with: $ kill %1 Where [1] is your job number.


0

Thanks for your reply. I think my words had some mistakes. When the signal is reffered to as pending in linux books and manual the signal is always "blocked". So this gives me a hint that when the signal is not block the generation and delivery of the signal are an atomic operation. I have no doubt about the disposition of new generated signal when a ...


1

Some of the answer to your questions depends on how the signal handler gets set up. I think we're looking at this in the context of setting signal handlers via the sigaction(2) system call. One of the elements of a struct sigaction is named "sa_mask". From man 2 sigaction: sa_mask gives a mask of signals which should be blocked during execution of the ...



Top 50 recent answers are included