Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

The original problem (based on reading all comments to the OP question) was that the scp executable on the 64-bit system was a 32-bit application. A 32-bit application that isn't compiled with "large-file support" ends up with seek pointers that are limited to 2^32 =~ 4GB. You may tell if scp is 32-bit by using the file command: file `which scp` On most ...


28

Rsync is very well suited for transferring large files over ssh because it is able to continue transfers that were interrupted due to some reason. Since it uses hash functions to detect equal file blocks the continue feature is quite robust. It is kind of surprising that your sftp/scp versions does not seem to support large files - even with 32 Bit ...


16

I'm not sure about the file size limits of SCP and SFTP, but you might try working around the problem with split: split -b 1G matlab.iso This will create 1 GiB files which, by default, are named as xaa, xab, xac, .... You could then use scp to transfer the files: scp xa* xxx@xxx: Then on the remote system recreate the originial file with cat: cat xa* ...


1

Handling errors in SFTP is a pain: the SFTP scripting language doesn't have conditional constructs; to do anything other than a predefined sequences of commands, you need to parse the output from the server after each command. You can do that with a tool like expect, but it's quite a bit of work, and it's difficult to ensure that you've covered every case. ...


1

In the vsftpd conf file check for: allow_writable_chroot=YES LINK TO MY ANSWER: vsftpd does not allow chrooted users write to directory


0

Usually you create two folders (could be "in" and "out" or whatever you want) and allow access to those folders, that way the user can't write in / but can write in those folders.


0

I use notepad++ which has a plugin NppFTP. It can be set up to copy files using sftp, then when you save the file, it uses ftp again to store the file on a remote server.


2

What we do in my team is use puppet to control this sort of file with the config stored in a subversion repository. Each person checks out a copy of the repository to their local machine, uses their favoured editor to make changes and then commits the change. The changes are automatically applied to the live machines by puppet (which runs with admin privs). ...


2

Copy them in as root and then chown them to the required owner.


0

I would find out exactly what OS and CPU type the remote system is using, then build a local VM using the same OS and CPU type. Then build a working environment inside that, which you can then tar up and unpack on the remote system. When building the software, I would make heavy use of --prefix options to configure scripts to force all binaries into a ...


2

Check your /etc/ssh/sshd_config. Find the line smth like Subsystem sftp /usr/libexec/openssh/sftp-server. Next you have two options (should work both, I do not remember which one I have used). First, you may register this executable as a shell and set it for the user, or, the second one, ForcedCommand for that user in sshd_config.



Top 50 recent answers are included