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3

You could switch to single user mode as SHW suggested and then back again. But for CentOS server you should do it this way: init 1; init 3 Since the first command will disable your network, you should pass the second one on the same line. Otherwise you will not be able to connect to your server using SSH.


2

Simply execute these two commands: init 1 init 5 Init 1 will bring your computer to single user mode, where minimal services are running, and init 5 will being the system back to GUI mode, by restarting all the services


0

To reload or restart network: sudo service network restart or sudo /etc/init.d/network restart To start networking service: sudo service network start


0

All what you have to do is to write this command: sudo hostapd -d /etc/hostapd/hostapd.conf it will list you all errors, you can then correct them in hostapd.conf file sudo nano /etc/hostapd/hostapd.conf


2

Depends on the distribution but RHEL-based distros use a Bash function they source from /etc/rc.d/init.d/functions that's called daemon which is itself just a wrapper around the runuser command. From what I can tell in the source files, it's functionally identical to su in most cases, it just doesn't go through PAM (probably to avoid some chicken and egg ...


1

The use of su someuser -c ... is what is needed. For starters, setuid() is a system call not available to shell code. Don't make this more difficult than need be.


1

The easier way is to check with your package manager. dpkg, yum, emerge, etc. If that doesn't work, you just need to type samba --version and if it's in your path it should work. Lastly you can use find / -executable -name samba to find any executable named samba. If those test are negative, is highly probable that you don't have samba installed.


1

A daemon is just an application. From the Wikipedia article. In multitasking computer operating systems, a daemon (/ˈdeɪmən/ or /ˈdiːmən/)1 is a computer program that runs as a background process, rather than being under the direct control of an interactive user. Traditionally daemon names end with the letter d: for example, syslogd is the daemon that ...


3

This just seems to be a bug in the service script. The behaviour is different for --status-all than for a single process. For a single process, service just uses exec to hand over to the init script itself (in this case /etc/init.d/lightdm). Here is the relevant snippet: if [ -x "${SERVICEDIR}/${SERVICE}" ]; then exec env -i LANG="$LANG" PATH="$PATH" ...



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