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Turns out there was a syntax error in the conf file in one of the whitelist rules. I found it by running milter-greylist -f /etc/mail/greylist.conf as all the kept printing to the maillog file was the connection refused error when I tried to start via service command.


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It seems your milter-greylist daemon is not running. Try to start it. At a guess, maybe /etc/init.d/milter-greylist start will do. ps auwx | grep milter-greylist should then return more than the line with "grep" in it, and if you still have errors there should be more of them (but just maybe in a different file).


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Reading through the 'at' source code it is a fairly trivial patch to alter the mail header that the at command creates to include a content-type field. The complete answer may be to add an environment variable e.g. AT_CONTENT_TYPE or a command line argument e.g. -c that the at command checks and validates the value against two allowable values being "plain" ...


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Send the message explicitly from your script, rather than just print the output and rely on at to send the message. Write the HTML to a file and use mutt to attach it and send the message. Alternatively, write the message with headers, MIME structure and all, and pipe it to sendmail -t -i. Using mutt is the easier way by far.


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I don't think it's possible to natively do what you are looking for. I'm not aware of any at implementation having the ability to, from within the job, make any real changes to the resultant message headers. However, you could run the script as a sub-process that produces HTML output, redirect that output into a file, and add any surrounding headers as ...


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You may want to use Exim or Postfix. The default Exim configurations I have seen allow you setup blacklists and whitelists very easily. You can also easily disable the network routers. With Exim I would: configure the server to listen on all addresses (0.0.0.0) configure the white list with those servers you want to be able to send you mail. configure ...


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Contrary to my own misconception partially based on its name, sendmail is a full blown MTA which can be set up to send and receive mail. To receive emails, you need to set up an MTA (mail transfer agent) which implies proper DNS configurations, the actual MTA and a POP or IMAP server for your clients to be able to get the messages. You should look for ...



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