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domains From the Gentoo Wiki's topic titled: 2. SELinux Concepts. As expected, the security context of the user (to be more specific, the domain in which it resides) has write access to the domain of the target's directories. The notion of domain is frequently used in SELinux documentation and refers to the type assigned to a process. BTW, as files do ...


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Replaceing Fedora 20 with OpenSUSE 13.1 solved the problem.


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A slightly heavy-handed solution to allow vsftpd access anywhere, would be: setsebool -P allow_ftpd_full_access=1 At that point, vsftpd can go pretty much anywhere on the system...


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You can usually find selinux denials in /var/log/messages. Try this (as root): grep avc /var/log/messages | grep ftp Review the output and decide whether the denials are erroneous, given your desired configuration. Tune the grep statements as necessary to whiddle the information down to only the statements you want to fix. It's often useful to ...


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SELinux won't let vsftpd serve files from places other than /var/ftp or write logs outside /var/log on purpose. SELinux is all about disaster mitigation. FTP is fundamentally insecure. Running vsftpd under SELinux is a good idea, because it minimizes the damage an attacker can do if he decides to attack your FTP service. Running a fundamentally insecure ...


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My mistake. This is not SELinux's fault. The tutorial on red hat is not complete. We should also add the following to the httpd configuration file(for apache httpd 2.4): <Directory "/mywebsite"> AllowOverride None # Allow open access: Require all granted </Directory>



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