New answers tagged

0

Those are used by semodule which is a tool used for managing SELinux policy modules. Operations are basically installing/removing, upgrading or listing modules. You can also use semodule to force a reload of policy without performing any other transaction. semodule acts on module packages created by semodule_package. Conventionally, these files have a .pp ...


2

Do you have the audit packages installed? If so, is auditd enabled and running? When you don't have the audit packages installed, audit & audit-libs and have the auditd service running, the logs will stop showing up in where you expect (/var/log/audit). When this is the case, they will show up in /var/log/messages.


2

This was resolved in this bugzilla: https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=1298192 Please make sure you have the latest kernel: 4.3.3-301


1

ausearch -i From help: -i,--interpret Interpret results to be human readable that't the correct answear as jsbillings wrote. No need to run tail -f ! P.S. Darn stack points ! That's why I couldn't comment or upvote.


1

First check to make sure that your server is listening on the port you want, not just local host netstat -plnt Should give you an output similar to this: Proto Recv-Q Send-Q Local Address Foreign Address State PID/Program name tcp 0 0 127.0.1.1:53 0.0.0.0:* LISTEN - tcp 0 0 10.0.3.1:53 0.0.0.0:* ...


2

Note: I am still interested in an answer to my issue but I did want to post a work-around that I am using that gives just as useful information if audit2why was working how I would have expected. Under the Howto for SELinux on CentOS.org there is a troubleshooting section. Therein is talks about how to use sealert to give human readable information parsed ...



Top 50 recent answers are included