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You can do it: cat gene_map_table_fb_2014_01_short.tsv |sed '1d' |awk {'print $2'} |awk 'BEGIN{FS=":"} {print $2}' |sed s/._//g At first cat your file, Then delete first line (header of columns with d1) , then print all of column, then seprate 4_FBgn0035847 with awk 'BEGIN{FS=":"} {print $2}' Then eliminate number_ with sed s/._//g Output is: ...


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Using awk This creates tab-separated output: $ awk -v OFS="\t" 'NR==FNR{a[$1]=$2;next} FNR==1{print;next} {sub(/intron_/, "", $2); sub(/:.*/,"",$2);if ($2 in a) $2=a[$2];print}' gene_map_table_fb_2014_01_short.tsv HC25_LNv_ZT02_intron_results.txt bundle_id target_id length eff_length tot_counts uniq_counts est_counts eff_counts ambig_distr_alpha ...


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That strings doesn't find the same patterns as your string is most likely caused by strings finding patterns at least 4 characters long and followed by a non-printable character. From man strings for GNU strings: For each file given, GNU strings prints the printable character sequences that are at least 4 characters long (or the number given with the ...


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Why not: grep -a string file | strings strings prints the printable character sequences that are at least 4 characters long. So if you grep for something shorter than 4 characters, processing via strings first will cause it to miss out. Use strings -n 1 to set the minimum length to 1.



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