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8

That you cannot install xdotool because you are not root doesn't mean you cannot run the program, for that you don't need any special privileges. Just download and compile from source. If you don't have access to a compiler then you can download the package for your system directly and extract the file from the package (for .deb first use ar, extracting ...


6

According to this answer you can move the pointer of your mouse with command-line with the following procedure: First you need to find mouse input device with grep mouse /proc/bus/input/devices | grep event You should see something like H: Handlers=mouse0 event7 in my case. It could output more then one line if you have more then one mouse (e.g. ...


3

A quick check of the source code of the current version, xautolock 2.2, shows that it doesn't support this feature, although it wouldn't be too hard to implement it yourself if you know a little bit about C and how to write X programs. The reason is probably this: whenever you want to know the status of xautolock, you also know what status you would like it ...


2

I use Fedora but I believe that Lubuntu/LXDE still uses xscreensaver. If so take a look at xscreensaver-command, which lets you do a number of things with its remote interface. For example --deactivate simulates user activity, so you could run that in a loop in the background once every minute or so with a script like this: #!/bin/sh while true; do ...


2

If your heart is not set on using vlock, you should take a look at physlock. Physlock does exactly what it seems that you are looking for: it switches to a new VT, locks it and disables console switching. Upon unlocking, you are returned to whatever console you were on when you invoked it (and it can be invoked from X or from a TTY). It has a great set of ...


2

See this command line option: -n,--new Switch to a new virtual console before locking all console sessions. What I always do is sudo vlock -ans, works inside / outside Xorg. It will jump back to the original VT when you unlocked it. EDIT Too bad, Arch Linux replaced the original vlock package with the one provided by kbd package. That one ...


2

vlock might be what you're searching for.


2

Okay, so I managed to solve it - maybe it's not the most elegant way but it works and it's good enough. First I wrote a small script: #!/bin/sh i3lock -i ~/Pictures/lock.png Saved it (e.g. .locker) to the HOME address, then I ran "chmod +x .locker" so I could execute it and at the Custom Shortcuts to the Command line I wrote ./.locker Choose an ...


2

You can do this via PAM configuration. For example, if you use XScreenSaver, you'd edit /etc/pam.d/xscreensaver and change the @include common-auth line. Rather than repeat all the details, I'll point you to my answer to Set sudo password differently from login one. The procedure is almost exactly the same, except that you'll be editing the PAM config for ...


2

You can use the functionality built into most media players to manage this; it works efectively with xautolock and it's lockers. mpv and mplayer both have a screensaver options: --stop-screensaver, --no-stop-screensaver Turns off the screensaver (or screen blanker and similar mechanisms) at startup and turns it on again on exit (default: yes). The ...


1

If vlock doesn't work for you, try physlock. It doesn't inhibit suspension and hibernation which is nice if you want to lock automatically when the computer sleeps. Also, physlock locks all tty's by default.


1

Xscreensaver is functioning properly. From what I understand, XGrabKeyboard is used by Xscreensaver which is grabbing the keys while the login window is displayed. The short answer is that you can't normally use the power button on the locked screen, but I did look through a lot of documentation and some code to figure out why this is and what possible ...


1

At System Settings -> Display and Monitor -> Screen Locker you can choose when to lock and when to lock with password. Also, there you can set a screensaver, so it can be as a warning that your session will soon be locked with password. If this is not enough, you always can install gnome-screensaver, but it may install some gtk-gnome dependencies, so be ...


1

It depends on your systems cryptographic hash used to store the passwords. do sudo cat /etc/shadow and look for the username followed by $number$ $1$ means you are using MD5 $2$ or $2a$ means you are using blowfish $5$ means you are using SHA-256 $6$ means you are using SHA-512 for example, sha-512 would give you a 2^512 max length. sha-256, 2^256th. ...


1

This sleep.d script should work (replace <youruser> with a user you've got the password for. I ran it with root the first time and couldn't get back in): #!/bin/sh case "$1" in hibernate|suspend) ;; thaw|resume) USER=<youruser> /usr/bin/vlock -ans & echo $! > /var/run/vlock.pid ...


1

According to SailorCire, you have to kill the screensaver program, you have to insert the following code with a little change in /etc/init.d/rc.local : pid=`ps ax |egrep -v grep |egrep pattern |awk {'print $1'}` kill $pid You have to change pattern to part of the screensaver name. Of course unique. May be above code doesn't work you have to call the kill ...


1

Scripts in /usr/lib/systemd/system-sleep/ will be executed pre and post suspension|hibernation when using systemctl suspend, so you can add a script to start vlock from there. Lots of detail here in the ArchLinux Systemd Wiki page.


1

How to enable screen locking in Gnome Shell (3.14) using xscreensaver (on Debian): (Note: Although the gnome-screensaver package currently exists on Debian sid, it does not seem to be usable) Install the xscreensaver package (and optionally xscreensaver-data and xscreensaver-data-extra) Run xscreensaver to configure the screensaver how you want it. Be ...



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