New answers tagged

1

bring key from windows to unix from private key on windows, generate public key, copy both to unix2. if using putty, use puttygen, then conversion, export openssh key private key look like: (RSA being the type of key) -----BEGIN RSA PRIVATE KEY----- MIIEpAIBAAKCUAEAzrtuUOEMAN1vaX1GFBLoBiDba/AiIdfFkTFJeZtaKtiuIpS7 (...) ----END RSA PRIVATE KEY----- ...


0

If only one integer will change (as in your example) you could do this: echo -e "1\n2\n" |xargs -n1 -i -P0 scp file.txt my-remote-vm-1:/tmp/conf-{}-ver-2


1

Run scp once, then copy it locally on the remote server. $ scp file.txt my-remote-vm-1:/tmp $ ssh my-remote-vm-1 'for i in /tmp/conf-[0-9]-ver-[0-9]; do cp /tmp/file.txt "$i"; done' $ ssh my-remote-vm-1 rm /tmp/file.txt


2

What you can do is to (if not already done) generate a set of public and private ssh keys on your machine for your user with: $ ssh-keygen Answer the questions in order to generate the set of keys. copy your public key to the remote host: $ ssh-copy-id remote-user@remote-host This will enable login-in from your username@host to ...


0

Nishat, Please use following cmd scp -r user@abc.com:/usr/etc/Output/*.txt /usr/abc/ Also you can setup the ssh key based auth to ask no password during scp.


1

When rsync believes it's accessing both source and destination on the same host it does not use its incremental transfer. Instead, it simply copies the entire file. This is the situation in your case. As a result, your second command is copying the file.so~new across your ssh fuse link to the local host, and then immediately copying it back again. Is there ...


4

Your problem has nothing to do with scp. It's related to inotify, the kernel interface that's used to trigger an action on file system events. And you're apparently triggering on the wrong event. Read the man page of incrontab to understand how the system works. If your processing script already triggers when the file has not been complete, I assume you ...


0

After a while I realized I had created the keys myself, with just "sudo ssh-keygen". This meant that the key actually belonged to the root user, and the jenkins user did not have permission to read it. If ssh had told me this, no problem. Apparently, though, the first thing ssh does if it can't read the key is to ask for a passphrase. But since it was ...


0

Here is the bit in the log that tells you what is happening: debug1: Trying private key: /var/lib/jenkins/.ssh/identity debug3: no such identity: /var/lib/jenkins/.ssh/identity debug1: Offering public key: /var/lib/jenkins/.ssh/id_rsa debug3: send_pubkey_test debug2: we sent a publickey packet, wait for reply debug3: Wrote 368 bytes for a total of 1709 ...



Top 50 recent answers are included