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2

the solution is to use scp, you add local's public key to the end of remote authorized_files. then scp username@100.X.X.X:Bharthi/* $path on local host, look in .ssh dir, if you don't have any .pub, do the following first (and only one time) ssh-keygen (1) scp-copy-id username@100.X.X.X (2) accept all default, DO NOT enter a passwd when prompt enter ...


2

The -C flag enables a gzip compression of an SSH stream. It's an equivalent of Accept-Encoding: gzip in HTTP. How the flag that performs depends on a kind of data you transfer: When transferring a single large file, the performance would be near the same to zipping the file before the transfer (neglecting efficiency of zip vs. gzip algorithm). But using ...


6

It enables the gzip compression in ssh (under the scp). On slow connections this will speed things up, on any reasonably fast connection ( 100Mbit or faster) the compression is very likely to slow things down. It will be more or less efficient than zip based on whether gzip (specifically gzip -6) would be more or less efficient than your chosen zip ...


7

It's never really going to make any big difference, but zipping the file before copying it ought to be a little bit less efficient since using a container format such as zip that can encapsulate multiple files (like tar) is unnecessary and it is not possible to stream zip input and output (so you need a temporary file). Using gzip on the other hand, instead ...


3

In this case scp will copy each source file to /home/me/logs, overwriting /home/me/logs with the contents of each new file. The result is that /home/me/logs will be a copy of the last source file in the list. All the other source files are lost. Oops! Regular cp warns and aborts in this case, at least!


0

I personally needed to gather a number of files I could only read with sudo and I wanted to do it in one go. ssh user@remote 'cd /path/to; sudo tar zcvf - files*' > files.tar.gz From there you just have to tar xf the file and get all of the files you want.


1

In case you don't want to mess with your local ~/.ssh/config file and the --no-motd option is not working for you either, I had success setting the RSYNC_RSH env variable. RSYNC_RSH="ssh -q" rsync You may also try to use the rsync option -e rsync -e 'ssh -q'


3

The short answer is that scp does interesting things when you give it two IP addresses to work with. If your source or destination is the machine running the scp command, then one of your paths should be local. If you're on the MyCloud, try this: WDMyCloud:~# scp Ben@192.168.1.20:/Users/***/Desktop/Apple.jpg /DataVolume/shares/Ben Or if you're on your ...


0

you can use winscp client just login with username/password you're allowed to login with . https://winscp.net/eng/index.php


0

The speed of network links is measured in megabits per second, not megabyte per second. A “100 Mb/s” network (the b should be lowercase) can transmit 100 megabits per second. The next speed up is 10 times as fast and called “1 Gb/s” or “gigabit”. The raw network speed is faster than the application speed, because there's some overhead for packet headers. ...


0

Your actual speed is 8MB/s x 8 bits per byte= 64 Mb/s (megabits per second). That's about 64% of the theoretical maximum. With OS overheads, TCP/IP ACKs, etc. I'm not too surprised. The earlier tips may help you push that up a bit, but you're never going to get above ~12 MB/s unless you go to gigabit Ethernet.


3

Firstly you shoud check if it hits the storage performance limit on either Windows or Ubuntu. If E: on Windows is a USB attached drive or memory card, 8MB/s is likely possible. Otherwise SSH encryption might be bottleneck. Try and see with lightweight cipher like arcfour. scp -o Cipher=arcfour -rv /cygdrive/e/plex caleb@192.168.1.126:/home/caleb/Desktop ...


2

scp -i /home/.ssh/id_dsa.pub There are two things wrong with this command. One is that /home/.ssh is unlikely to exist. SSH keys are normally in the directory called .ssh in your home directory, and your home directory is typically something like /home/bob, so the .ssh directory is /home/bob/.ssh. The other, more conceptual, problem, is that scp (or ...


1

Question... when you ran this command: ssh-keygen -t dsa It would have prompted you for a keyphrase, thus: [admin@test ~]$ ssh-keygen -t dsa Generating public/private dsa key pair. Enter file in which to save the key (/home/admin/.ssh/id_dsa): Enter passphrase (empty for no passphrase): Enter same passphrase again: Did you leave the passphrase ...


4

Don't use password authentication. Use ssh keypairs. Karthik@A $: ssh-keygen #keep the passphrase empty Karthik@A $: ssh-copy-id B #enter your B password #^ this will copy your public key to Karthik@B:.ssh/authorized_keys From then on, you should be able to ssh from A to B (and by extension, scp from A to B) without a password.


0

Generate an ssh-key on server A using ssh-keygen. This will generate a private and public key pair in $HOME/.ssh. Add the public key to the $HOME/.ssh/authorized_keys file on server B. You can use the man command to get more information. The command man authorized_keys will present the manual page that discusses authorized keys. Try the following sites ...



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