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6

It's possible that the backspace key on the keyboard may actually be generating the DEL character. That's sort of confirmed by the fact that both intr and erase are set to DEL according to your stty -a output. I have no idea which one would be given priority in that case since I've never been foolish enough to try it :-) (a) A quick way to confirm would be ...


6

The files were extracted but they are in /dev/... I doubted that could happen when I first read your question, because tar programs have for many years been stripping leading / from paths automatically for security reasons. Without that protection, you could ship someone a malicious tarball that overwrote system files. Think of the fun you could have by ...


3

Try: groupls Lists what groups you are in. groupls (username) groupls -a Lists all groups (taken from: OSR600 Docs) System administration tools are in /etc on SCO, so if you don't have this directory in your PATH, you'll need to specify the full PATH: /etc/groupls


3

Yes : id userlogin This will show you uid(and name) of the userlogin, followed by his primary group gid (and name) then all the groups userlogin belongs to Gid(s) (and name(s)) You can also specify some options like : id -g userlogin # gives only the gid id -ng userlogin # gives group name instead of gid id -G userlogin # gives list of ...


3

UNIX (POSIX) is a set of "guidelines" which must be followed by an operating system (and it's parts) for it to be considered a "UNIX". So asking which is the UNIX OS that the others are based on or which was the first doesn't really mean anything. Sure there was an operating system which was the first to be coined a UNIX -- but really, what you're talking ...


3

NOTE: as author in one of the links commented, it would be best to make a copy of the raw disk before trying any sort of SCO fsck or trying to mount the filesystem. I see your options as: Connect and mount the drive on an existing SCO system or Boot the hard drive into SCO OpenServer (or SCO rescue disk if you have one) and then copy your data off via ...


3

gcc-98q2-dist.tar.gz contains a GCC installation image, that is, a tarred-up installation of GCC. All you need to do is untar it to the root directory: cd / tar xzvf gcc-98q2-dist.tar.gz But I hope you won't be using a GCC version from 1998. gcc-2.95.2pl1-dist.tar.gz seems to be a tad newer, but still old (1999). Anyway, if you need a newer version, you ...


2

Did you read the manual? I don't have SCO but I presume chown works as in oridnary unix: SYNOPSIS chown [OPTION]... [OWNER][:[GROUP]] FILE... DESCRIPTION [...] If only a colon is given, or if the entire operand is empty, nei‐ ther the owner nor the group is changed. So try chown test /opt In case you want to change the group ...


2

ctype.h is part of the standard C library, so it really should be on your system somewhere. I don't use SCO, but on my various FreeBSD machines at home, and the numerous Solaris machines here at work, ctype.h is in /usr/include. If it's not there on your SCO machine, perhaps it's in /usr/local/include? Or perhaps there's some other standard location under ...


2

Probably the rule, should be: pass in quick proto tcp from any to any port = 22 keep state pass out quick proto tcp from any to any port = 22 keep state in /etc/ipf.conf


2

Unix is a trademarked name and there is only one specification for Unix. To be called a Unix system, you must apply for and be certified to use that name.


2

If your question is about code base lineage and not standards, current OSes directly descending from the original Bell Labs / AT&T Unix releases are AIX, HP-UX, Oracle Solaris & OpenSolaris derivatives all coming from System V release 4 and (Open/Free/Net)BSD and derivatives from the much earlier Unix version 6. While Mac OS X has some BSD code, its ...


2

OK, I found out, that I needed to verify the System and the Software, using scoadmin. Then once that was done, I installed SCO Maintenance Pack 5, and rebooted the machine. Now when I type: # bash bash-3.1# Getting bash on the machine works great! Edit This also works with the standard user too (not just the root user).


2

Here the list of cmds to download FILENAME from SITE_NAME: ftp open SITE_NAME write login info get FILENAME


2

A very simple use of the ftp client would be to specify the server's hostname on the command line: ftp hostname. Then use ftp commands ls and cd [directory] to navigate in the server's directory structure and use get [file] to fetch the desired file. Notes: FTP servers usually allow login for anyone, provided you use the anonymous username. To connect to ...


1

Your version of tar doesn't apparently provide this switch/feature. So you'll have to do this in 2 steps: $ gunzip gcc-2.95.2pl1-dist.tar.gz $ tar xvf gcc-2.95.2pl1-dist.tar For more information take a look at the man page for tar and also check tar's options.


1

I finally solved the problem, running a query using another tool (not through MS Access or MS Excel) worked massively faster, ended up using DaFT (Database Fishing Tool) to SELECT INTO a text file. Processed all 50 million rows in a few hours. It seems the dll driver I was using doesn't work well with any MS products.


1

Some things to try, in no particular order: file(1) might be able to identify the files Any strange, not mounted disk partitions could be raw devices Rummage around in /etc/init.d (or whatever system it uses to start services), the database was probably started from there somehow. strings(1) applied to executables often help to identify callouts, version ...


1

The history and timeline of UNIX is nicely presented here and shown pictorially here. As noted, there is a single UNIX specification that defines "Unix" to which all products must conform to be officially compliant and branded. The various vendor brands can be found here.


1

I never tried it, but you might have more luck with NetBSD, which has more powerful binary emulation features. It claims to support SCO UNIX binaries; you might need to supply your own libraries.


1

Supposedly there is a binary emulation support that is available to the Linux kernel though it needs to be compiled in. I've always found though that it is better to port the application or run a native alternative then try running through an emulator.


1

Would think you add them the same as you would with iptables. Here is a quick doc on IPF though. http://www.freebsd.org/doc/handbook/firewalls-ipf.html


1

Your .profile, like any “dot file” (configuration file whose name begins with a .), is located in your home directory. This is the default directory when you log in, you can use the cd command with no argument to return there, and you can use ~ as a shortcut to it, e.g. you can refer to your .profile as ~/.profile no matter what the current directory is. If ...


1

Not guaranteed to work, but if you used pkgadd to add the software, use pkgrm to remove it. $ pkginfo {package_name} $ pkgrm {package_name} See if you can find the sco opensever release notes for your version of java for how to uninstall.


1

smbstatus -v Will list all connections and locked files.


1

You need superuser priviledges. If you are familiar with sudo, then use asroot and tfadmin for SCO OpenServer and SCO unixware, respectively.


1

That message means you don't have sufficient privileges on the system to change the mode of the directory. If sudo is not installed on the system, you will need to gain elevated privileges using su (you'll need the root password), when you will be able to use chmod in exactly the way you would on Linux - using either absolute or symbolic permissions. If you ...


1

Shared folders require a driver in the guest OS. Turning on the option in the VM configuration merely gives the guest permission to access shared folders. The guest might not know how to turn VMware shared folders into its notion of filesystem. According to the documentation on SCO OpenServer as a guest OS, the VMware tools (which include the shared folder ...



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