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1

I'm looking at this one: Slurm is an open-source workload manager designed for Linux clusters of all sizes. It provides three key functions. First it allocates exclusive and/or non-exclusive access to resources (computer nodes) to users for some duration of time so they can perform work. Second, it provides a framework for starting, executing, and ...


2

Ah, it's not the systemd-logind feature where each user gets it's own cgroup. I think the change responsible here is older; they're just confusingly similar. (I searched "process group fair scheduling", thinking it might be something based on unix's "process groups" that I never really understand). Wikipedia: The Linux kernel received a patch for CFS ...


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Yes, Linux's scheduler keeps track of where each thread was last scheduled, and favors keeping a thread on the same CPU if it can. You guessed the reason: migrating a thread from a CPU to another is more expensive than keeping it on the same CPU. There's even more to it: the scheduler knows about multiple levels of cache coherency, and tries not to migrate ...



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