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Make sure you are using rsync -z to compress over the network. Other options to consider are -H (hardlinks) and -S (sparse files). Before you run your rsync, do a version with -nv which does no updates but shows you which files will be updated. Out of the list of files, use your knowledge to match where a missing file might already exist on the remote, ...


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If I understand the question correctly, you want to rsync all the files in the range A0000000 through A0000095.  Well, then, don’t say A*; use a list of positive wildcards (a.k.a. globs or filename expansion patterns) that generate the file names you want, rather than identifying the ones you want to exclude.  Do it by decomposing the range into subranges: ...


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Since the numbers are padded with zeros to the same width, the numerical order is identical to the lexicographic order. Therefore your problem is equivalent to removing the files starting with a given file in the lexical order. You can do this by building a string containing the file names separated by newlines, and using string substitution to remove the ...


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I have solved the issue. I have been meaning to do this move for a few months. in that time I have been rsyncing all users folders to the new server. I forgot to add the --delete command to the rsync command thus old email messages were accumulating on the destination (new) server even after the user had deleted them from the old server. Therefore when I ...


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Can you specify the rsync command that you used as if I'm not mistaken you need to make sure the modification timestamps are preserved when doing the rsync. A quick look at man rsync tells me that rsync should have the options like -tPrlHpogEAXz when you run it.


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If you have configured server and created user accounts on debian. Then to migrate mails, you can use imapsync utility. This utility just synchronizes mails between two servers. You don't need to worry about mail directory path/structure on both servers. But you should know password for user account to transfer mails. Check imapsync use link for more ...


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I want to limit the transfer to arround 100Mbit/s So I used the following settings: rsync --progress -v --bwlimit=10000 --temp-dir=/tmp srv:/tmp/* /tmp/ 100 Mbit/s is (approximately) 10 MByte/s, which is indeed 10,000 KByte/s. If you're hitting rsync burstiness then maybe the separate tool trickle will help: trickle -s -d 10000 -u 10000 -t 10 -l 100 ...


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You can do this by setting up a loop through each directory in the source and if there's no directory in the target by that name, it moves it: bourne snippit: for dir in `cd "$sourcedir" ; ls -1F | grep '/'` do if [ ! -d "${targetdir}/${dir}" ] then mv "$dir" "${targetdir}/" fi done Note that this will either break or overwrite a file if you ...


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Depending on the situation, a quick option is to create a symlink on the remote system: user@remote$ ln -s ~/name\ with\ space/ ~/name_with_space Then use the -L flag in rsync which tells it to follow directory contents: user@local$ rsync -avz -L user@remote:~/name_with_space/ ~/name\ with\ space


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Summary: If rsync gets data to a disk, it will do so losslessly. However, to be totally sure it actually got data to the disk, you'll need to apply the fsync.diff patch, or call sync <files> afterwards. SSH provides data integrity—you're receiving the same data as you're sending. That accounts for the network. Then, rsync uses the write system ...


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On SuperUser there is an alternative posted by Sehe: http://superuser.com/questions/297342/rsync-files-newer-than-1-week rsync -RDa0P --files-from=<(find sourcedir/./ -mtime -7 -print0) . user@B:targetdir/


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rsync --size-only --times (or any other option that includes those, such as rsync --size-only --archive) does what you want. Basically, --size-only is intended for when you switch from a sync method which doesn't sync timestamps. It will transfer files that differ in size, and other than that, just transfer metadata (mtime, permissions, etc.). Note also ...


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This works in bash: Escape the spaces with backslash and then use quotes: rsync -avuz me@some.server.com:"/media/Music/Heavy\ Metal/Witch\ Mountain/*" .


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It's impossible to exclude partial files because there's no such concept. As soon as the producer has created the file, the file exists, but it starts out empty and gets filled gradually. You can test whether the file is open for writing; that would tell you that it's incomplete. However this is not reliable: if the producer crashes (either the process ...


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If the sizes of the files are fixed (after the write operation of the application), you can transfer only the files based on the size so the files that are not done being written to yet will not be copied : --max-size=SIZE don't transfer any file larger than SIZE --min-size=SIZE don't transfer any file smaller than SIZE options of rsync ...


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@darKoram. For cases where you invoke ssh with non-standard path and try use ssh in ProxyCommand that is problem because there no inheritance. You have two option there: direct provide same file in inner command, or dynamically hack it. You may look detailed description in my blog post about that: ...



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