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1

The rsync manual warns about this scenario (section “Include/exclude pattern rules”): this won't work: + /some/path/this-file-will-not-be-found + /file-is-included - * This fails because the parent directory "some" is excluded by the '*' rule, so rsync never visits any of the files in the "some" or "some/path" directories. One solution is to ask ...


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Consider using Backup Exec for Linux. Not free, but that'd cover your management needs. What are the "Windows people" doing for a backup solution? Are you allowed to purchase the same kind of solution for the Linux side? BTW, logrotate can be used to rotate out your backup copies. There are a number of great discussions in stackexchange regarding the use ...


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Use the following command: rsync -av --include-from=DirectoriesToCopy.txt --include /data/ --exclude='/data/*' --exclude='/*/' / /media/MyDestination/ You need to include /data/ explicitly, you could also have added that to the list in the file. Then exclude all other directories (order is important with includes/excludes). Note that your usage of -r was ...


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The order of --include and --exclude options is relevant. You are first including all *.pdf files, the later exclusion of *web*.pdf never applies because of this. Note also that include/exclude patterns apply to node names (files, directories, etc.) and not to pathnames, unless you have a / or ** in the pattern; so excluding *web*.pdf wouldn't exclude ...


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This already does a full backup. The contents of the directories that are excluded (such as dev, run, etc) are created in run time and should not be backed up. Copying boot folder will not override your boot sector, so that is fine. Using rsync here is the correct method as rsync can work within the same system or remotely and it will also only update ...


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Try this way: find /path/ -exec rsync -A -X -av -r -s root@xxxx:/path/ {} \;


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Your theory sounds right to me. Each time through the for loop when you invoke rsync, it's reconnecting to the server and causing you to be re-prompted. Rather than loop through the file, ~/list using for you could give this list directly to rsync using the --files-from= switch. Example $ rsync --partial -z --files-from=/some/list server:/some/location/ ...


2

Remove the \ from before the space. An escaped space is used to stop the shell splitting at spaces. As you are using a file to list your excluded directories and files then the words Mendeley Desktop will never pass through the shell and therefore will not need escaping. If you were listing them on the command line with --exclude then you'd need to escape ...


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Both the servers needs to have same ssh port. If your port on one server is 22 and other one is say 44 then scp will not work.


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Perhaps run rsync via strace/truss and see if you get an error back from the chown() syscall, and also to confirm that chown() has the correct path and UID/GID.


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Yes the -v option should only list the transferred files/directories. Are there any applications running that might change the Pictures folder? Maybe you can try this: mkdir /backup/Pictures rsync -avHc Pictures/ /backup/Pictures Did it make any difference? Maybe try after the first run diff /backup Pictures, what's the output there?


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This tells rsync to look in each directory for a file .gitignore: rsync --filter='dir-merge,-n /.gitignore' [...] That should do what you want. The -n after the dir-merge means that (-) the file specifies only excludes and (n) rules are not inherited by subdirectories.



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