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You could use something like rsync -avP --inplace user@remote:/path/to/archive.dat CopyOfLocalArchive.dat This tries only to transfer differences. If the archives are too different there won't be too much benefit. But maybe worth a try.


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Some clarification of the question may be required. Rsync will make a copy of the source directory. If you perform an rsync and then alter the destination those changes would be overwritten during the next rsync. If you're only looking to modify the source I would recommend taking a look at incremental backups with rsync. I use a script based on this ...


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–link-dest should be --link-dest. I copied –link-destfrom the linked webpage, and still don't know how to tell – and - from each other in a webpage and in terminal. If you know, can you tell me? Thanks.


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I looks like your syntax is wrong, that might be why it isn't working as expected. From man rsync --backup-dir=DIR So it should look like this and this works for me: rsync -tbr --backup-dir=/tmp/rsyncTest/bkp/ /tmp/rsyncTest/src/ /tmp/rsyncTest/dst/ The --backup and --backup-dir options only work when the files have been changed. For example, say ...


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The reason why 'folder' got created in bkp is because of the --backup-dir option. This option told rsync to designate bkp as the backup directory (i.e., it is in this folder that pre-existing files in dst folder will be moved). Just remove this option to avoid creating this folder.


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For my backup I use a cron job that runs: rsync -tOr [src] [dest] Its only backing up about 25G, so Im not sure what changes at your file sizes. edit after seeing your clarification, this is obviously not what your after, Im not sure if rsync has that built in. I would look at {bash/python} scripting it if I needed to accomplish this.


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If you haven't saved the whole output from rsync, then the only way to find what wasn't copied is to run another traversal to compare. You might as well run rsync again: its whole point is not to transfer what has already been transferred. Don't pass the -v parameter so that you won't be overwhelmed by boring output. rsync -aq … 2>rsync.err (You can ...


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Very useful for scripting is to use --password-file command line option. Create empty file called rsync_pass write in password to this file (nothing more) chmod 600 rsync_pass rsync $args --password-file=rsync_pass user@rsynchost::/share localdirectory This can be user for scripting and allows to be more secure that just exporting password to system ...


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Backshift looks like it would fit your requirement. I've not used it - but I do want to try it out. How it works. Lessfs also looks a good contender. Again, I've not used it but may give it a whirl.


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The best for your needs will be rsync, which will synchronize files from one computer to another (if you want two way sync, use unison). You can also use tools that build around librsync, such as rdiff-backup or duplicty. The answer to your question is that librsync is a library implementing rsync algorithm, and is used by rsync tool but also by the ...


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librsync is the complete package which ships rdiff command. To use rdiff in your system you need to have librsync package installed.


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What about screen ? screen - screen manager with VT100/ANSI terminal emulation Open the terminal with screen. Run you command and you can close the terminal. You can then reattach if necessary.


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In many shell * do not include / symbol (rather than ahead .) (see man 7 glob and globstar|dotglob options in shopt) , so if you want to exclude AppData and Downloads you should provide full path from source (--exclude="*/*/AppData" --exclude="*/*/Downloads") or just remain name only (--exclude="AppData" --exclude="Downloads") if does not matter on which ...


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This might help some readers: In Windows, an older, little freeware program -- Third Dir -- does exactly what's being asked for here. It's no longer available via the developer, Robert Vašíček. But I'm sure it can be found via some repositories online. Here's the developer's description, which remains on his site: Third Dir: An unusual ...


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rsync explicitly turns on the --whole-file option when doing a sync across filesystems as opposed to doing a sync between a network location and a filesystem. The delta transfer algorithm is designed to minimize network traffic at the cost of possible extra local IO traffic. It's faster to simply transfer the whole file locally than to read both files ...


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I have found this link on SSH ProxyCommand to be a very useful way to enable SSH proxies. It lets you go from Server --to-->proxy---to-->destination very easily and transparently!


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Replace this: 50 5 * * * /home/user/bin/sync-folder With this: 50 5 * * * /home/user/bin/sync-folder > /dev/null 2>&1 Add email inside script: #!/bin/bash sudo rsync -rav --delete --log-file=/tmp/rsync-output /origin /destination grep folder /tmp/rsync-output if [ $? == 0 ]; then mailx -s "Rsync Complete at `date +"%F %T"`" ...


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Information based on documentation for version 2.1.x. Based on this your sync section should look like this: sync{ default.rsync, source="/home/user/data/source_data/", target="/home/user/data/synced_data/", delete=false, rsync={ checksum = true, _extra = { "--remove-source-files", "--delay-updates" } } } I ...


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As you have discovered you cannot use rsync with a remote source and a remote destination. Assuming the two servers can't talk directly to each other, it is possible to use ssh to tunnel via your local machine. Instead of rsync -vuar host1:/var/www host2:/var/www you can use this ssh -R localhost:50000:host2:22 host1 'rsync -e "ssh -p 50000" -vuar ...


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It's possible to use tar via ssh to transfer the files: ssh -n user1@host1 'tar jcf - -C /var/www .' | ssh user2@host2 'tar jxvf - -C /var/www' Change j parameter (for tar) to z in two places if you wish to compress the archive with gzip, instead of bzip2. Usually bzip2 has the higher compression than gzip, but it's slower, so change it depending on your ...


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The Ideal way would be to run the rsync on one of those servers. But if you do not want to run a script on the remote server. You could run a script on your local system and do an ssh and execute the rsync there. ssh user@$host1 <<ENDSSH >> /tmp/rsync.out 2>&1 rsync -vuar /var/www host2:/var/www ENDSSH Also, as you maybe aware rysnc does ...


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The server may be returning an @ERROR message, but the client may be misreporting it as a premature EOF instead. The first step is to figure out what the underlying error is. I suggest you run rsync with simpler flags to see if it works. It's possible that rsync is failing to load libz but it doesn't notice until it's time to compress something. The second ...



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