Hot answers tagged

21

Summary Databases tend to keep a lot of metadata, organizational data, etc. An insert is very unlikely to be a simple append, like it would be with a text file. Testing SQLite shows it behaves that way, in both WAL and non-WAL modes. This leads to rsync having to sync a lot more data than you'd expect. You can reduce this overhead somewhat by using a low --...


4

Perhaps you could use the -M option (long version --remote-option), which does not seem to be checked by the client rsync. -M-xxxx is passed to the remote with the -M stripped off as -xxxx. You can easily play with this using -M-M-xxxx, which is ignored by client and remote: rsync -av -M-M-myvar=val /tmp/test/ remote:test/ If your server front-end ...


3

rsync will report changes for permissions differences timestamp differences content (and filesize) differences In comments, @roaima pointed out that there is an option to give a summary of these changes, in the rsync manual page: -i, --itemize-changes output a change-summary for all updates You may find it useful, though the summary is terse and ...


3

This isn't exactly pretty, but it could all be hidden away in a script: SSH can send arbitrary environment variables across the tunnel; both the client and server need to be configured to allow it. The client is easily done with the -o option; the server you'd have to do in your sshd_config file. Accepting arbitrary ones is a bad idea, but something like ...


2

Difference with sudo could be due to the extract below from Documentation/filesystems/vfat.txt. (Requires knowledge that your target filesystem is of type vfat & who owns the directory^Wfilesystem - determined by mount option in the case of vfat). I went ahead and posted this anyway because it shows how important the filesystem types are. The general ...


2

Yes, rsync is your best bet. Something like this should work: rsync -vr --size-only --times <source> <dest> --size-only tells rsync not to copy the files again, --times tells it to update timestamps.


2

Rsync synchronizes files unless it is able to decide that they're the same without comparing their contents. It might synchronize a file and realize that there aren't any differences, if it wasn't able to tell that the files are identical without checking the contents. By default, rsync decides that two files are identical (and thus skips reading their ...


2

Use the gui to mount the encrypted directory, then login to the synology as root over ssh and type mount. You will see a line like /volume1/@mycryptdir@ on /volume1/mycryptdir type ecryptfs (rw,relatime,ecryptfs_fnek_sig=88...,ecryptfs_sig=88...,ecryptfs_cipher=aes,ecryptfs_key_bytes=32) This shows your directory /volume1/mycryptdir is implemented on an ...


1

The -a option (--archive) implies the -t option (--times, "preserve modification times"). You may negate this option using either --no-t or --no-times after -a: rsync -a --no-t ... (untested)


1

The usual method is (writing from memory): NEWBACKUP=`date +%s` # or some other format cp -al "$OLDBACKUP" "$NEWBACKUP" rsync -aH --delete "$SOURCE" "$NEWBACKUP" Check out Easy Automated Snapshot-Style Backups with Linux and Rsync There is also a --link-dest option to rsync that I've never investigated properly.


1

expect is written in the tcl language, so strings containing whitespace must be quoted with double-quotes " not single quotes '. So replace your spawn line with spawn rsync -arvz -e "ssh -p 1690" --protect-args --progress /home/pappu/ "backup@xx.xx.xx.xx:/volume1/56 - Backup Server/pappu" Also, as mentioned by @steeldriver, a carriage-return is written \...


1

I had this problem in a script (I don't know if it's your case). I was because I used this command in a script and I was using sh instead of bash. check the shebang at the beginning of your script.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible