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--prefix works only with relocatable packages, to change destination directory for binary files In your case, you should use --buildroot parameter instead.


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you can use rpm -qi <package name> to have all information of installed package. you can use below commands as well yum info <package name> yum list <package name> yum --showduplicates list package name


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Homebrew also has a recipe for rpm installation, just run brew install rpm


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For reference and completeness sake, one command that would be able to achieve what initially asked for would be something like this (quickly fiddled together, but it's working) rpm -qf $(rpm -Va 2>&1 | grep -vE '^$|prelink:' | sed 's|.* /|/|') | sort -u Here's a short explanation of the various parts: rpm -Va 2>&1 Will run a complete ...


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Find the following line in your php.ini: ;extension=php_mysql.so Remove the semicolon, which is serving as a comment, then restart apache. If that doesn't work, report back... This has been transcribed from StackOverFlow


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Normally, this is solved with different package naming. The first package would be mycoolpackage and the second one would be for example mycoolpackage1. With this method you can have different versions of the same software installed and still update both versions via yum. One example for this are the packages samba (samba version 3.6.9) and samba4 (samba ...


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If a website only runs HTTP you won't be able to access it in HTTPS, no matter how hard you try. However, you don't need HTTPS to ensure package integrity. Each RPM is digitally signed to ensure no third party has tampered its contents. FYI, the GPG keys for RPM Fusion are here and they'll be automatically installed when you download and install the RPM ...


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While I'm unable to explain why the newest kernel wasn't booting automatically, the kernel booted by GRUB is set in /boot/grub/grub.conf using the default=<menu entry number>, where counting starts at 0. In this specific case, default=1 will boot your desired kernel.


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Source packages are not added to the rpm database, so they will not show on query. Probable location is ~/rpmbuild/{SOURCES,SPECS} with SOURCES containing the package sources and distribution patches while the SPECS subdirectory containing the .spec file being used to build the package (see rpmbuild (8) man page for details). If you can't find the sources ...


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It should be under /usr/src/kernel. if you dont find it, you can try rpm -qa| grep -w kernel-devel rpm -ql kernel-devel-x.x.x.x.x This will give you the location of files installed by kernel rpm. Bye the way, kernel source should be installed with kernel-devel package, rather kernel-x.x.x.x


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If syslog-ng is requiring a new version of rpm-libs, then it sounds like syslog-ng was built with rpmbuild, librpmbuild, etc which was compiled from newer source than than the "rpm-libs" package that is installed on your production server. If you have the source to rpm-libs, rpm, rpmbuild, etc that is installed on your server, then you should try to ...


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In Debian and derivatives there are six types of dependencies: pre-depends depends recommends suggests build-depends build-depends-indep Each of these give corresponding reverse dependencies. To list them you can use grep-dctrl: grep-dctrl -FBuild-Depends mypackage -sPackage /var/lib/apt/lists/*Sources will list all the packages which build-depend on ...


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There is a 'goldendict' package that is part of EPEL. Enable EPEL by installing the 'epel-release' package, then 'goldendict' will be available to install through yum.


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Try this: $ yum install --downloadonly --downloaddir=/pkgs/ `cat pkg_list` You can specify multiple package names on the yum command line. The only caveat here is that your command line may become too long for the shell. Thanks



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