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1

Your syntax is off. The %defattr macro looks like: %defattr(<file mode>, <user>, <group>, <dir mode>) So: %defattr(-,root,root,644) Means: keep the file mode of the file as it was installed, set owner to root, group to root, and set the permission of directories to 644. You probably want: %defattr(0644,root,root) Update ...


0

To fix this: yum remove epel-release Re-download the epel-release RPM Install it yum install pyliblzma


-1

From the command line you can use the tar command.


0

As seen in the cpantorpm docs: The perl module may be obtained in a number of different ways. The perl module may exist on local disk either as an archive file or a directory, or it can be retrieved from a URL or from CPAN. For example, any of the following ways could be used: cpantorpm Foo::Bar cpantorpm ...


1

I recently had a similar problem with missing files on openSUSE 13.2 and fixed it with: rpm -Va --nodeps --nodigest --noscripts --nosignature --nofiledigest --nosize --nomode --nordev --nouser --nogroup --nomtime\ | awk -e '($1=="missing") && ($2=="d") {system("rpm -qf "$3);}; ($1=="missing") && ($2!="d") && ($2!="c") {system("rpm ...


0

The problem here is that you haven't configured your server to accept the key that signed the package as a valid GPG key for this repo. The easiest solution is of course to run yum with nogpgcheck, though it's obviously also less secure. But if you've downloaded the package and verified it, and are keeping it in a place where it shouldn't be possible to ...


0

If the package isn't signed, the simplest solution is probably yum --nogpgcheck install chef. If you have a local repository, you can set: gpgcheck=no In the corresponding .repo file.


-1

check the file level permission for the root user, it has to be (read write and execute) $ls -l /var/lib/rpm/.rpm.lock -rwxr-xr-x


0

The Fedora Project has a list of best practices. Basically, the idea is that if a package requires a specific group, user/group management should be handled by the rpm install script using useradd or groupadd and should use getent to determine if the user or group it needs already exists. This allows administrators the flexibility to manage system ...


0

I realize this is an old question, but I came here trying to find how to create groups in an rpm spec file. Hopefully, the following will be helpful. To check if if a group exists and see which users are part of it, use getent group root for group "root" for example. I also found the following helpful as a standard way to add groups in an rpm spec file: ...


4

Add this to the start of your .bash_profile ? if [ ! -z "$TMOUT" ]; then env -i bash --init-file ~/.bash_profile fi Beware the wrath of the sysadmins if you leave a gazillion old sessions running as a result of defeating their timeout rulings.


3

You can issue perl commands from the command line... perl -e '$|++; while (1) { print "\e[0n"; sleep 120; }' or you could do the same in shell (a sh/bash example): while sleep 120; do printf '\33[0n'; done Or you could use watch: watch -n 120 printf '\33[0n'


0

The best way is: yum shell <<EOF install foo ts solve remove foo run EOF ...using deplist/etc. will mostly work, but isn't guaranteed to get the exact same result.


-1

Remove the entry /usr/lib/rpm/check-rpaths from ~/.rpmmacros and re-run rpmbuild.


7

You can use the yum deplist command to generate a list of package dependencies: $ yum deplist bind dependency: /bin/bash provider: bash.x86_64 4.3.39-5.fc21 dependency: /bin/sh provider: bash.x86_64 4.3.39-5.fc21 dependency: bind-libs(x86-64) = 32:9.9.6-10.P1.fc21 provider: bind-libs.x86_64 32:9.9.6-10.P1.fc21 dependency: coreutils ...


0

Check out yum upgrade-to x-version (like x-1.0.1). Maybe that is what you need You can use yum --disablerepo in order to use only the relevant repository (latest or stable)


0

It seems that most Java server machines use Red Hat That may be true (I don't know), although it's probably reasons other than this provides some particular advantage with regard to java. Redhat is a popular production server because (for a fee) it comes with commercial support from Redhat. This relieves people of having to pay their own support ...



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