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In practice, it doesn't really matter whether you build it from source or package some pre-existing archive. noarch RPMs are meant to be architecture-neutral, i.e., they must contain no (native) binaries. If the package is comprised of interpreted scripts (Bash, Python, etc.), documentation, headers, media files, etc, even compiled Java classes, then it can ...


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But the name of the programs/packages each on its own line in a file, say packages.txt, and use rpm -qa |grep -iFf packages.txt Now ... the second part, with the find command seems rather silly. This is somewhat Linux-specific: Better to run (as root) ps and/or netstat -nap for any daemons and processes listening to ports. Some of these are udp only, so ...


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downgrading glibc can be very dangerous as system could be crash. glibc packages are critical kernel packages in every aspects. before doing any upgrade or downgrade activity on glibc make sure you've taken proper OS backup


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The command rpm appears to change its exit status depending on whether the queried package is installed, so it can be used by if: for package in "${ARRAY[@]}"; do if rpm -q $package >/dev/null 2>/dev/null; then echo "Package $package is installed." else echo "Package $package is not installed." fi done


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I think the most offical way to do this is Copr, which acts in a similar way to Ubuntu's PPAs. Repos can be added to yum via a repo file - for example, this copr provides a updated version of Chromium, which can be added in various ways: YUM repo file (@ /etc/yum.repos.d/churchyard-chromium-russianfedora-fedora-21.repo - provided by RPM on the page): ...


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A yum repo is essentially a file repository either local, ftp or http. Since you have a remote repository with repo data you can use the yum utils package on Fedora to clone the repo. First install the needed packages to synchronize and manage repository metadata. yum install yum-utils Next subscribe the machine that will host your repo to the Fedora ...


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You can't. RPM used to have a built-in concept of groups (look at /usr/share/doc/rpm/GROUPS for the canonical list, still), but this turned out to not be very useful and was dropped. (But even then, there was no way to express requirements in this way.) Now, package groups are done at a higher level in "comps" files understood by yum — but there's no way to ...


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I was ultimately able to do it using something like this: rpm2cpio myrpm.rpm | cpio -ivd './var/lib/**/*'



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