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2

The file logstash-forwarder_linux_386 is an executable. It's ready to run, there's no unzipping to be done. You can see that with the file command: $ file logstash-forwarder_linux_386 logstash-forwarder_linux_386: ELF 32-bit LSB executable, Intel 80386, version 1 (SYSV), statically linked, not stripped You need to make this file executable and place it in ...


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Typically RPM sets vendor through a build system configuration macro. The buildhost cannot be reset and was originally included in package metadata to help identify misconfigured build systems that caused "buggy" packages. So in RPM vendor can be overridden but buildhost cannot (but you can configure a chroot with /etc/hosts to map the IP address ...


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Hawing googled a bit, I noticed that the most common answers on your question are - "yes, you can, using the .rpm file for CentOS/EL7". Following, for example this guide, you may really download package for CentOS 7 and use is. If you'd like to find any alternative way, you may follow this page and search the best one for your usecase. For example, you may ...


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If it's just a package, you should be ok. It's generally not advised to install Fedora packages on CentOS because of the risk of unmet dependencies, since Fedora typically has more recent versions of libraries etc. This is less likely to be the case (but still possible) if you are installing a CentOS package on Fedora. If on the other hand it's a package to ...


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As I am not sure it is possible in the 'Requires' part of the script to specify a repo as a dependency, it may be better to include the repo file in the package you are building, or add as a dependency a RPM that provides it. A existing solution for including the repo file is the one used in the Google Chrome package, which is to add the repo file and GPG ...


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Is there a reason you can't use the yum command? Also, are you trying to install tigervnc-server? Either way, you can approach this by using either: rpm -q --whatprovides libXaw.so.7 or yum provides libXaw.so.7 to find out what packages provide this shared object. You should look into creating a repository from the RHEL 6.5 server install disc Create RHEL ...


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There are cases where you use rpm first, to perform some preliminary stuff, before yum. A good example is MySQL. (1) rpm -iv mysql-community-release-el6-5.noarch.rpm At this point the mysql/yum repository is ready and you can start relying on yum only to get the main mysql and the rest of optional packages: (2) yum install mysql-community-server See ...


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I think these steps will work for you: sudo apt-get install rpm2cpio rpm2cpio <RPMfile>.src.rpm | cpio -idmv Another option is sudo apt-get install rpm rpm -ivv <RPMfile>.src.rpm Both packages, rpm and rpm2cpio are available in Debian stable.


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The tool to do this on RH-esque systems is rpm2cpio. If you can find that tool for Debian systems, or build it for Debian systems, that's pretty much all you need. The command is: $ rpm2cpio <RPMfile>.rpm | cpio -idmv


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Just copied contents of following directories from machine to another. /usr/lib/python2.6/site-packages and /usr/lib64/python2.6/site-packages. And it worked for me.


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Plug a pendrive on the CentOS host that have internet conectivity Mount the pendrive(depends on your hardware probing). Probably: mount /dev/sdb1 /media Create a dir inside your media to keep things clean mkdir /media/rpms Use yum to download the software you want with it's dependencies. Here: yum install -y --downlaodonly --downloaddir=/media/rpms python ...


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You could try rebuilding the rpmdb rpmdb --rebuilddb This fixed a similar problem for me.


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Because they are arch dependent. Either rebuild the .src.rpm on the arch. you care about (the one in the source repos. is built on a random supported arch), or download and unpuck the .src.rpm and yum-buildep on the kernel.spec.



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