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5

You have only Link-Local, non routable ipv6 (fe80::/10). So You have no public routable IPv6. In this configuration You can make ipv6 connect only to Link-Local addresses in same L2 segment.


3

on each node, check: cat /proc/sys/net/ipv4/icmp_echo_ignore_all if it is 1, change to 0: echo 0 >/proc/sys/net/ipv4/icmp_echo_ignore_all


3

The issue is that you're trying to route a packet from namespace ns_snd through ns_mid to ns_rcv. The kernel is going to treat the namespaces as if they were separate hosts. Meaning you have to configure the kernel to act as a router. This is rather simple to do: sudo ip netns exec $NS_MID sysctl -w net.ipv4.ip_forward=1


3

The reason why your setup doesn't work is that your WAN-router (let's call it r1) cannot know how to reach the VM behind your Ubuntu router (let's call it r2). You must (on r1) add a route to the 3.0.0.0/24 network, with the LAN-address of r2 (192.168.1.254) as next hop. How to do this depends on the software of r2. As an aside (as has been pointed out ...


2

To ping using IPv6 you have to use the following command: ping6 example.com But even currently you only have a link-local address so that will not work. You need a IPv6 address that is routable to be able to ping outwards.


1

The IP 169.254.169.254 is in the network block 168.254.0.0/16 allocated for Automatic Private IP Addressing. It should never be routed to the internet. If your IP address is in the block you will not have direct connectivity to the internet. However, you may be able to use a proxy to connect to sites on the internet. There are a number of mechanisms ...


1

There are a few things to point out about your question's content which should answer you: An IP address does not generate a DNS lookup. It simply generates a connection request that gets routed. The existence of a proxy server on any system does not in itself decide what happens with the traffic. What does is the routing table and firewall rules. The ...


1

I think this will work: ip route add 10.1.1.1/32 dev eth0 So when you ping 10.1.1.1 it will route via eth0.


1

There is no 100% certain way of knowing a network communication failure is being caused by a firewall, but by going with the rule of elimination, you can come to this conclusion. Make sure you are not running any server based firewalls, likes of iptables. Because, if you go to firewall people, they will blame those first, most of the time without doing ...


1

It would help to know the Unix or Unix-like O/S and version because software and file locations can differ. If I understand the problem, you want each machine to have WAN access using eth0 and LAN access using eth1. For any Linux, make a new routing table for eth1, naming the network "mgmt", or whichever name you like. echo '200 mgmt' >> /etc/...



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