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7

I'm going to have to be cheap and copy my answer from this question. ntop is probably the best solution for doing this. It is designed to run long term and capture exactly what youre looking for. It can show you which clients are receiving/sending the most traffic, where theyre recieving/sending to, what protocols and ports are being used etc. It then uses ...


6

It could be a missing dependency. Notably you'll get that type of message if the runtime linker ("program interpreter") set in the ELF header does not exist on your system. To check for that, run: readelf -l your_executable|grep "program interpreter" If what it gives you does not exist on your system, or has missing dependencies (check with ldd), you'll ...


5

ntop can give you exactly what you're asking for. It collects data about all the traffic flowing through your network (and can collect data from other networks if they have a device configured to send netfow data to your system). It will show you every host on the network, with how much bandwidth they've used. It will let you drill down into each host and ...


5

Don't bridge your internal and external interfaces. Your box is a router, not a switch. To make your machine a router you have to tell it to ,,forward'' packets between interfaces. I do so by echo 1>/proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_forward. IIRC the way(TM) to do it is adding a line net.ipv4.ip_forward=1 to /etc/sysctl.conf and then execute /etc/init.d/procps ...


5

For a simple router, there are really only two steps that need to be done. Enable routing The first step is to enable routing in the kernel. By default, the kernel drops packets that it doesn't recognize; once you enable routing, it'll forward them. You need to issue either of these two commands when the computer boots: sysctl -w net.ipv4.ip_forward=1 ...


5

This isn't related to BusyBox. BusyBox is a set of unix utilities designed for low-resource environments such as routers. Your router's root filesystem is mounted read-only because it's stored on SquashFS, a compressed filesystem which cannot be written to. A SquashFS filesystem is compressed in one go when the filesystem is built and cannot be modified ...


5

It's not possible to connect to a port-forwarded public IP address from inside the same LAN. To explain this, I'll need an example. Let's suppose your router's private IP is 192.168.1.1 with public IP 10.1.1.1. Your server is on 192.168.1.2 port 2222. You set up port forwarding from 10.1.1.1:1111 to 192.168.1.2:2222. If somebody on the Internet ...


5

Spoofing your MAC-Address is relatively simple: General steps: Save your MAC for a future reset Temporary disable your interface to change your MAC Set your new, arbirtray MAC Enable your interface again Using different tools: With ip: ip link show <interface> &> ip_savehafen.log sudo ip link set dev <interface> down sudo ip ...


4

Assuming you are looking for software, your best choice is probably pfSense. You could also choose m0n0wall. If you're looking for hardware, see the pfSense list list of hardware vendors. Both m0n0wall and pfSense will run on the ALIX.2D13 board.


4

They mean whatever the driver designer wanted them to mean. There are many many others too, like ib0 for Infiband devices. But I am not aware of anywhere that has a complete list as again it depends on who develops the driver as to what the name of the device is. Usually it gives some clue as to the type of board but that is about it. The number after the ...


4

From the ASUS RT-N56U wiki page: What are the existing network interfaces (transcript naming interfaces)? br0 = LAN + WLAN + AP-Client + WDS eth2 = Ethernet interface GMAC1, that connected to the switch (trunk port). eth2.1 = LAN (VLAN VID1) eth2.2 = WAN (VLAN VID2) ra0 = WLAN 5GHz ra1 = WLAN 5GHz Guest rai0 = WLAN 2.4GHz ...


3

Simple solution create a tunnel between the two servers, e.g: On server A: ip tunnel add tunnel mode ipip remote 10.10.60.10 ip addr add 10.1.1.1/24 dev tunnel sysctl -w net.ipv4.ip_forward=1 The last command is to forward packets from your newly created tunnel device to your virtual ethernet devices. On Server C ip tunnel add tunnel mode ipip remote ...


3

First plug in the IPs of the network for which you want to act as router. Either get multiple network interface cards or configure a virtual interface. You need to enable packet forwarding from /etc/sysctl.conf and then configure iptables for NAT. Here is a brief tutorial for the same.


3

Try out this Live CD Linux Router distro. I would also suggest looking at one of the firewall distros such as Sentry, Monowall etc. Oops that should be Smoothwall. Some others are IPCop and Devil Linux.


3

You don't even need a Linux box if You wan't to try it out. There are multiple Linux-based solutions available for home router devices allowing You to administer them from the command line (GUI for the less "get Your hands dirty" people) with https://openwrt.org/ http://www.dd-wrt.com being just the two most popular.


3

It sounds like there may be an IP address conflict on the local network. If two devices have the same IP address, it'll be down to chance which ARP reply is honoured by other hosts. To test this, try this: disconnect the host you're having trouble with delete its IP address from another host's ARP table (on Linux, arp -d [address]) ping the IP address ...


3

There are special-purpose distributions. They tend to cater to simple routers with basic firewall capabilities, with the aim of fitting onto devices with limited capacity. If you want a complex firewall with things like IDS a general-purpose distribution is more up to the task. For something you'll run at home, an ordinary distribution (Arch, Debian, ...


3

What exactly do you mean by "connect"? What do you want to use the connection for? You say you prefer terminal commands. In this case simply install an ssh-server on the one box and use ssh on the other box. Let's take ubuntu/debian as an example OS: box1$ sudo aptitude install openssh-server openssh-client box1$ ssh localhost # you should be able to log ...


3

Which of the following situations do you mean? [RDP client on Windows machine] => [linux server] => [windows Terminal Server] If #1 is the case, you can use SSH proxy + proxycap on Windows: http://superuser.com/questions/507239/is-there-a-sshuttle-equivalent-for-windows-ssh-tunneling-for-windows [RDP client on MacOSX/Linux machine] => [linux server] => ...


3

To accomplish that, you need to put eth0 and eth1 into bridge mode on the PC and give 1 ip to the bridge interface (not on the individual eths) Here are the basics about bridging on linux, to get started http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/BRIDGE-STP-HOWTO/index.html Depending on your distro there might be a faster/better way to do bridging. Now, the wireless IP ...


3

Your assumptions are correct. However, what you observe on a commercial router is not a feature of DHCP, but a separate program, a name server. The bind nameserver is a very common choice for nameserver. You install it on your router. The, you reconfigure DHCP, because DHCP(d) can tell the clients which nameserver to use. To tell you how to reconfigure your ...


3

You can do this through ssh's ProxyCommand facility. Add the following to your $HOME/.ssh/config file. Create it if it doesn't exist with just this content: Host remoteserverX User userint ProxyCommand ssh userext@externalserver nc remoteserverX %p Host remoteserverY User userint ProxyCommand ssh userext@externalserver nc remoteserverY %p ...


3

You could get this with a small set of iptables rules redirecting all traffic to port 80 and 443 your AP's address: # iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING -p tcp --dport 80 -j DNAT --to-destination localhost:80 # iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING -p tcp --dport 443 -j DNAT --to-destination localhost:80 Additionally you should have your HTTP server configured to ...


3

You need at lease 2 interfaces do be able to do forwarding by routing mechanism. Those interfaces should be wither physical ones (think eth0 eth1), vlan (eth0.1 eth0.2), vpn (tun), bridge (br0), bond... but not aliases. Aliases are just a way to attach more IPs to the same interface. However as you have private IP addresses, you can do SNAT and DNAT to ...


2

That message is pretty thin; it doesn't even tell you there is actually a problem. It has something to do with multicast source filtering. Normally with multicasting, an IPv4 machine joins a multicast group using the IGMP protocol — this is why you see igmp in the log line — which tells all the network equipment around it that it wants to ...


2

Two guesses: Packet loss. Do not trust the "ping" you ran in parallel since the packet loss may be affecting only those TCP streams, for whatever reason. One simple way to detect it is to run $ netstat -s -p|grep "segments retransmited" frequently on both sides (ssh client and server) during the SSH session. See if the counter increases, in which case you ...


2

Since you are running this on powerful hardware, I'd recommend you just install the distro you are already most familiar with and take it from there. Setting up any random distro as a router isn't hard, just install iptables and run echo 1 > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_forward iptables -A POSTROUTING -t nat -o eth0 -j MASQUERADE Assuming eth0 is the device ...


2

With the addition of your last two requirements, I'd suggest using CentOS and configure everything per your requirements. Those two requirements would require enough modification to any router/appliance distro to make you go crazy. So yeah, install CentOS, then you can use smoothwall or similar package to simplify your routing setup You can use wireless as ...


2

The application you are looking for is macof which is part of the dsniff toolkit. You'll find that ettercap is also quite useful when doing any sort of network auditing on a switched network. Warning: I'm a firm believer that you need to understand the threat to defend against it, but you best be using these tools in your own lab on your own equipment. If ...


2

With iptables firewall this works (Openwrt also uses iptables): iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING -s 192.168.1.0/24 -p udp --dport 53 -j DNAT --to 192.168.1.1 iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING -s 192.168.1.0/24 -p tcp --dport 53 -j DNAT --to 192.168.1.1 On your router use Opendns servers. 192.168.1.1 is the Openwrt router ip. 192.168.1.0/24 is the LAN network ...



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