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1

You can prevent all users and even root user to login to system if you delete /etc/passwd file. Deadly commands that can ruin your system


2

By the very definition of what the root user account is, this account can do EVERYTHING & ANYTHING. It can completely destroy the system's filesystem and manipulate anything on the system. If you're going to do any experimentation such as this, you'll want to do it in a virtual machine, not on your bare metal system. Since this is a learning exercise I ...


1

Apparently the test I was running before asking the question did not show a clear behavior. Tried again with gdb -- it appears that a root program can attach to a partition created by another user even if that partition's permissions allow access only to its creator.


1

I think what you are asking for is how to give a non-sudo user permissions to allow Nginx to bind to privileged ports. If that is the case then in the /etc/sudoers file (shortcut visudo) add these lines: Cmnd_Alias NGINX = /path/to/binary/nginx username ALL=NOPASSWD: NGINX Of course in the above example you need to change the /path/to/binary/ to match ...


2

/home is where all users usually get their home directories created under. Examples: /home/marcelo /home/joe The /home may sometimes reside in a different filesystem (i.e., a separate harddisk, another partition in the same harddisk or even network mounted) than the / (main system's filesystem). For this (and probably other reasons as well), the root ...


2

In case of trouble during booting (resulting in other volumes not being mounted) it helps that root (which is used for repair logins) has its home directory available. /home is often on a different volume.


5

According to the Filesystem Hierarchy Standard (FHS): /home : User home directories (optional) /root : Home directory for the root user (optional) A typical non-root user's home directory would be /home/$USER. /root is also special in that (in many distros) /root is readable only to root (700), but a normal user's home directory has read access to others ...


1

I use JuJu which basically allows to have a really tiny linux distribution (containing just the package manager) inside your $HOME/.juju directory. It allows to have your custom system inside the home directory accessible via proot and, therefore, you can install any packages without root privileges. It will run properly to all the major linux ...


0

Based on your error message, it looks like the login shell for the root user is not set properly in the /etc/passwd file. $ grep root /etc/passwd root:x:0:0:root:/root:/bin/bash Mostly in your system it might be as root:x:0:0:root:/root:/bin/bash/**** Where **** is your username. Open /etc/passwd file and correct the login shell.


2

It sounds like for some reason, your sudo is not configured to run from the directory you launch it it. I don't know how or why that should be the case but you can try these alternatives (for the sake of these examples, I am assuming your ISO is mounted at /home/slugger/iso, change that to the actual path of the mount point): Use the full path sudo ...


1

Try: Mounting the ISO. cd to Mount Point sudo sh install or sudo sh install.(prefix) That calls sh (the default shell) with the install script as a parameter, it should be able to run the script correctly as long as it is an sh script (most such scripts are).


0

If this is for a daemon, the standard way of doing things is to put something like this in the init script file: USER=bob ... su -c '/command/to/start/actual/daemon' "$USER" In the script file that should be run as bob, just put sudo in front of the pertinent commands. Also, make sure you read this about enabling alias expansion in non-interactive Bash ...


1

So, based on @wurtel's answer and the research I've done, here's the script and the steps I came up with. 1) Unmount the "home" partition umount /dev/mapper/APP05-home 2) Resize the "home" filesystem to a size of 2G resize2fs -p /dev/mapper/APP05-home 2G 3) Reduce the size of the "home" logical volume to 2,1G (the volume needs to be a little bit bigger ...


1

Ignore the first "rootfs" entry, the real mount is shown by the /dev/mapper/APP05-root line. To reduce filesystem size, first shrink the filesystem size with resize2fs, and then use lvresize to reduce the device size. To increase the size, use the utilities in reverse order. Reducing the filesystem size needs to be done while the filesystem is not mounted. ...



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