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0

Core dumps are crash dumps. The program file with one of the core files as argument might tell you which program keeps crashing.


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These are so-called core dumps. Some signals' default handler besides killing the receiver of the signal is writing out the memory contents and process state at the time of death for post-mortem analysis. Unless you're planning to dissect those files you can safely remove them. You could also inhibit the creation of core dumps by setting the appropriate ...


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They are dumps of the memory core of programs that have crashed while being run by the root user. Unless you plan on debugging them, you can delete them.


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On Unix based systems, services listening on privileged ports require the blessing of the system administrator. This indicates that the service is being run by a trusted (at least by the administrator) user. Users of such services can then trust there is some administrative oversight of the server application. The value of this trust may not be as great ...


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There are several reasons to start a web server as root: to bind to port 80 (ports below 1024 are reserved to root, so that if a remote user is connecting to a service on a low port, they know that this service is approved by root); to set up confinement, e.g. chroot; to read and serve users' web pages, where applicable. That least reason is a poor ...


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Although POSIX has a standard for capabilities which I think includes CAP_NET_BIND_SERVICE, these are not required for conformance and may in some ways be incompatible with the implementation on, e.g., linux. Since webservers like apache are not written for only one platform, using root privileges is the most portable method. I suppose it could do this ...


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All the below contents are from here. The error message implies that, the root's home directory is missing. You can recreate it with mkdir /root, but it'll be empty. Normally, you should not log in directly as root. All direct root access should be disabled for remote logins and X sessions, although allowing root access from text-mode terminals can be a ...


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You are missing one of the drivers that is necessary to access your root filesystem. The code in the initramfs is looking for a block device to mount and failing, so the problem is in accessing that device. You won't get a more explicit message because the code in the initramfs can only see what it has access to and the problem is that it doesn't have access ...


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Found it!!! It was the drivers for my hard disk controller, SATA AHCI was not added while configuring kernel before compilation. Now I added, recompiled and viola! new installed kernel booted up. :)


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login(3) and others do expect primary group. They need it so they can set valid fields in the utmp/wtmp files. And even if they didn't (changed file format), you would hit more fundamental problem when login(1) or sshd(8) or other programs try to setup the user session -- regardless of utmp/wtmp they need to fill both UID and GID kernel process properties ...


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It's not just a security issue. It's a "I'm less likely to destroy my system by accident by typing something stupid" issue. As goldilocks said, there is no such thing as a "non-root superuser". Common sense dictates that you should run with as few privileges as possible. That is all.


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The advantages of a "non root, unlimited superuser" are essentially nil (unless you count the protection against brute force attacks - many more attempts will be done against root than against server). The advantages appear as soon as you delegate functions and create a set of limited superusers, or superuser commands through the sudo mechanism, because ...


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(I'll try to be brief.) In theory, there are two dimensions of privileges: The computer's instruction set architecture (ISA), which protects certain information and/or functions of the machine. The operating system (OS) creating an eco-system for applications and communication. At its core is the kernel, a program that can run on the ISA with no ...


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Root and non root privileges are all user space related things. For example, a root user can install an application and an ordinary user can't. However, even the root user has some limitations. Those limitations are imposed by the design of the operating system do differentiate between user space and kernel space. For example, even dough you are a root ...


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First, a clarification: It requires to have root privilege to change permission to a file. From man 2 chmod we can see that the chmod() system call will return EPERM (a permissions error) if: The effective UID does not match the owner of the file, and the process is not privileged (Linux: it does not have the CAP_FOWNER capability). This ...


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Use su: su - alice sudo vim /etc/hosts From man su: The su command is used to become another user during a login session. Invoked without a username, su defaults to becoming the superuser. The optional argument - may be used to provide an environment similar to what the user would expect had the user logged in directly. For more ...


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According to this site, the default root password is "toor" https://forum.porteus.org/viewtopic.php?f=81&t=1062 If you can log in as root using that password, you should be able to access that folder. If are logged in as guest, then from the command line you can switch to root with the command "su root", and then enter root's password. As root, you ...



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