Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

I found that the scanimage -L works after I added saned to the group lp, moments after I posted the question. I still am interested in the proper answer to this question (where does the information come from). So, this answer is for future visitors who just want to have it fixed.


1

To generate the encrypted password you can use the perl function perl -e 'print crypt(" ","\$6\$saltsalt\$") . "\n"' which will give: 6$saltsalt$dbMv1WdXXWhYJXZCacilMdWabQOTCkYM.6OIQb/.md67MGEi2mORqm2dx6vAzJ.frP0Nm7m/c8lMQq5OFRTM0/ replace saltsalt by any random string Please note that you cannot put a plain text password in /etc/passwd or ...


0

In short, no. The formats of these files are very specific, and the password field strings are hashes which will have a minimum length of 8 characters, 16 or more on more modern versions that use stronger password hashing. If you're looking for a way to just put in a text string, look at the gecos field in /etc/passwd. If you want a way to have an ...


0

I received the same error when trying to :wq a file on a disk that was completely full. If you receive this message, you may wish to check your available disk space.


0

I'm thinking of an IOPS issue. That usually makes your computer sluggish and eventually freeze. To check it, start the copy process and monitor CPU wait time (wa) using top command: $top top - 13:24:59 up 6 days, 56 min, 8 users, load average: 0.86, 0.65, 0.63 Tasks: 247 total, 2 running, 245 sleeping, 0 stopped, 0 zombie %Cpu(s): 12.3 us, 2.2 sy, ...


2

Here the answers: root has always full access to files and directories. The owner of the file usually has them too, but this is not always true. For example: -r-xr----- 1 user1 users 199 Oct 14 18:42 otherfile.bin user1 is the owner; however he can only read and execute, but root still has full access (rwx) to the file. RUID is the Real User ID and it ...


2

Without any more information than this I am going to guess you are trying to copy a 4.4 GB file to an external drive with the FAT filesystem. FAT can not handle files larger than 4 GB.


2

I think the best way is as is shown in Red Hat documentation. This is your second method. For GRUB2/RHEL7 single/emergency mode should not work since it will use sulogin to authenticate you before presenting the command prompt. So lets mark off different methods. For RHEL5, RHEL6, append 1, s or init=/bin/bash to kernel cmdline For RHEL 7, append ...


7

There are various way to do this. The simplest, and worst, is to have the password in the script as you suggest. Since your computer is not connected to the internet, most security concerns are moot and you could just use sudo's -S option that allows passing the password from STDIN: echo password | sudo -S shutdown -h now A safer approach is to allow a ...


0

One approach would be to boot from some other media, such as CD or USB/SSD, so you don't have to deal with the operating system fighting against the rm.  Possibilities include any live CD that includes a shred capability, or Darik's Boot and Nuke (DBAN). I have no association with DBAN.  I have colleagues who use it.


1

If you want to delete everything on the partition (as I assume from you saying "delete the whole root") you can run shred /dev/sdXY where sdXY is the device you want to wipe.


0

Sudo would be the tool of choice and you could divide the accesses up by group. Create the 3 groups you want as administrators add the users you want in each group. Set your command aliases in /etc/sudoers Cmnd_Alias APPADM = /usr/bin/yum Cmnd_Alias USEADM = /usr/sbin/useradd Cmnd_Alias NETADM = /usr/bin/service network * And then the group ...


0

Typing the password the next day, revealed, that my procedural (typing) memory access was working again and I used the Shift once more. So it was merely a typo. Good luck to all up-voters of the question :) (Procedural memory is different from the declarative or explicit or verbal memory. Expect bugs in both features, when having a hard time recalling a ...


1

The simple fact is that if a person can arbitrarily install programs then they probably can install a program that will run under root privileges, so they could install programs that would grant them other types of access. IE any person who can install or modify something that is run as root, is or can easily become root. If you want to separate out your ...


1

sudo has ways to give users access to some, but not all, commands through sudo. You can use the visudo command to safely edit the /etc/sudoers file, with some syntax checking before the file is really saved. Inside the file, you can add a line like mike ALL=(root) /usr/bin/aptitude, /usr/bin/apt-get to give mike access to aptitude and apt-get through sudo, ...


2

You have to have someone have access to the root account to provide additional privileges. Beyond that, you can use sudo to limit effect areas of control for other administrators without giving them root. But overall, what you're describing seems to be more of a political / training issue than a technical issue. Hire the right staff, and they won't get in ...


2

I guess we are talking about YOUR system here. Since you own the system the fastest way would be to change it. If you are in the sudoers, you can sudo bash and then passwd to change root password. If you're not, start your system with any live CD you have around, mount the drive where your system is in /mnt for instance, chroot to /mnt or where you ...


1

SUDO_USER is documented in man sudo (not sudoers): SUDO_USER Set to the login name of the user who invoked sudo. That is, if you run sudo sh -c 'echo $SUDO_USER' it is a roundabout way of getting the effect of whoami. sudo logs when a user runs (or tries to run) a command through it. You can list them with journalctl /usr/bin/sudo or something ...


1

Some options: sudo -i, that's the most obvious alternative. sudo -l then look for a command that you are allowed to use that you could use to solve the problem, like : editing a file executed by root, like crontab, logrotate, executon yum/rpm... go to the console, and connect as root (only ssh is restricted if I understood) open a graphical session, some ...


1

The question implies SSH (or equivalent) as the only access. The only way generally to get from a user privileged process to a root privileged is via su, sudo, or another site local alternative. If you don't have one then you are hopefully out of luck as the presence of an alternative suggests a security hole of some sort. That said, the suggestion of ...


1

Assuming you're in a group that allows you to sudo, then: sudo -i will give you root access and allow you to repair /bin/su. Remember that you use your user's password with sudo - not root's password.


-4

scp su command to your home dir, and run it, of course, careful it compiled for centos and for your arch. aftre comming root , cp su to /bin/


1

Your ultimate problem was that mailx, when called from a shell script run by smartd, started by systemd, on Arch Linux, was not reading the root user's $HOME/.mailrc file. This was caused by a few factors: The mailx on Arch Linux, s-nail, relies on the environment variable HOME when looking for the .mailrc file. If HOME isn't present, it uses the current ...


0

In System Settings click Login Window. Click tab for Options click Allow Root Login


1

Not exactly a pretty solution, but shouldn't it work when you run commands that require root privileges with sudo inside the script and add a nopasswd rule for them?


0

This 2 configuration options should help you to make ntpd more secure: NTPD_OPTIONS="-g -u ntp:ntp" NTPD_RUN_CHROOTED="yes" Explanation NTPD_OPTIONS="-g -u ntp:ntp" - -g sets once when starts to ntpd ignore the default threshold that is set to 1000 . -u ntp:ntp makes the daemon run as ntp user and group. NTPD_RUN_CHROOTED="yes" - Makes ntpd run ...


1

According to this discussion CAP_SYS_RAWIO capability needs to be applied to smartctl executable.



Top 50 recent answers are included