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3

If you have the "suid" version of busybox, you could try to make the date command execute as root like this: File /etc/busybox.conf: ... [SUID] date = ssx root.root ...


0

If you want to do it with sudo instead of su, you could do this: sudo sh This will log you in as root on the terminal, then you can do what you want to do. But I wouldn't advise you mess with /root, because there must be a reason it is not assessable by other users. You should move '1.txt' somewhere else. Hope this helps!


1

It is apparent that the /root directory on your system does not have (at least) 'execute' permisions for the user 'yu', either through group membership or the 'other' bits. Thus, 'yu' cannot list the contents of the /root directory in order to determine if /root/1.txt exists or not. For further description of file and directory permissions (in Linux, as ...


0

https://httpd.apache.org/docs/current/install.html You should be a power user of some degree- wheel, sudo, or su. I would advise against building in your home directory- apache will need some dependencies. It is best to install in it's default directory: /usr/local/apache2. I have built from apache.org's directions reliably on standard installs- it ...


0

If you want your webserver listening on port 80 (where webservers usually listen, but if it's only for your own use, you could probably do with another port), it will need to be started by root, in that case you'll need root access at some point anyway. RHEL 6.7 probably has packages with apache, mysql and php that just work, you'll probably need to be root ...


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Are you compiling from source, or using rpm / yum? Either way, you'd either have to be in the wheelgroup, sudo, or su ROOT to install / build most packages and dependencies you'd need.


6

Don't. /root/ is not world readable for very good reasons. If you really need to work with that file, put it someplace else.


1

You could create a script to do that backup and either run it automatically via cron or give his user the possibility to run only that script via sudo (if you want it secure, make sure he can only read and execute the script, if he could edit, he could easily get more rights.)


1

So the reason that you're backup is failing as a normal user is because the libdata file that mysqlbackup is attempting to copy/backup is owned by a different user (more than likely, 'mysql') or a privileged user. So, running mysqlbackup as an elevated user is probably the right choice here as you're attempting to do. I surmise that the reason you aren't ...


1

Probably secure_path is set in /etc/sudoers. The path shown by which mysqlbackup is not included there, but it is shown in echo $PATH when run as your user or from a root login, right? It does seem odd though.


0

The simple answer is: no As long as you have to create those two partitions via a script or similar on the usb stick, you are editing the partition table and create a file system which is something that requires root access. Given that you already have those partitions with the correct file system and you have the two images from qemu mounted locally ...


2

If the software root is using can be configured to do "evil" stuff (or to display information in some unexpected way so that the root user does "evil" stuff out of not-knowing or false knowledge) by the config file, then that is a viable attack. In general, you weaken security, if access rights to edit ~/<configfile> can be more easily gained for that ...


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I have two machines running GNU/Linux, both of which have the /root directory modified periodically without any manual intervention. I can therefore confirm that the /root directory being modified is perfectly normal and is nothing to worry about.


2

You have set NOPASSWD for the script /home/mukesh/Desktop/connect.sh, not anything inside it that requires sudo password. You need to run the script using sudo: sudo /home/mukesh/Desktop/connect.sh and then remove sudo from the script: #!/bin/bash pppoe-start It it's just a single command then you could just add that command to sudoers instead (no ...


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Anything running as root can write there (and if it is writing to the home directory without a specific pathname, output files will go there). It is not customary to do this: perhaps you ran a program while logged in as root. hplip is a printer-utility which has to be installed and configured interactively. For instance, this bug-report shows a case where ...



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