New answers tagged

0

This will currently only work with version 1.30.0-ish or higher, it does not work on any current version of ubuntu, unless you build from source. virt-sysprep -a CentOS-6-x86_64-GenericCloud-1601.qcow2 --root-password password:asd --ssh-inject root:file:/root/my.key.pub


0

Thomas Dickey is absolutely right. However, don't do this. Use sudo instead. Create /etc/sudoers.d/change_root_pass YOURUSERNAME ALL = (ALL) passwd root (Change YOURUSERNAME).


1

In your program, you probably overlooked making the real and effective uid set to the same value. Gids also should match root's gid. Something like this: setuid(geteuid()); setgid(getegid()); See for example sue (a simple setuid/setgid wrapper).


1

I would not recommend disabling the root account by blanking the root password. This will create implication for the user when working in GUI. E.g. YaST requires specifically the root password. As sudo is not a program and a built-in command, it cannot be invoked by GUI. You will then have to invoke YaST from CLI using sudo to be able to make any changes. ...


-1

Seems you have a big mysql database and a small partition so you could either repartition using Gparted or change the place where mysql saves its data to /home, which is sometimes not safe(hacking) or buggy. To change the place where mysql saves its data: assuming the new directory is /home/mynewsqldir 1. Obvious enough. service stop mysql 2. copy your ...


1

The outputs of du and df don't line up in terms of used disk; search for deleted files that are being written to. Stop (restart) the process writing to the file(s), or reboot the box. lsof | awk '/deleted/ && $5 ~ /w/' Implement log rotation and find out why the log keeps growing at that tremendous rate (and rectify the root cause).


0

Short answer; increase space either by removing data or increase the actual size of root filesystem. Long answer; When you have such a big disk at your expense and you are using lvm as well, it is encouraged that you crate separate file systems for /var, /tmp, /var/log, /opt etc. First of all, find what is eating your disk space by running the following ...


0

From my research I believe I know the answer - this is impossible to achieve. Sudo is a command line only and cannot be invoked from GUI. This answer does not explain the nature of what's happening because honestly I don't understand the details, but I made peace with the fact that it's not achievable.


1

You need to add yourself to the wheel group: sudo usermod -a -G wheel $LOGNAME Then GUI would ask for your password, not the root's one.


4

PermitRootLogin No doesn't prevent root logins entirely, it only prevents root logins through ssh. Enabling this option prevents a class of brute force attacks where an attacker tries to ssh root@server with some common passwords (including an empty password, which can work if PermitEmptyPasswords is enabled). The point of refusing remote root logins is that ...


0

All Unix/Linux systems have some sort of "rescue" environment, which logs in root for maintenance in a minimalist environment. Sometimes the best way to do this (e.g., for Fedora) is to boot installation media for rescue. This works even if you really made a mess. Check the documentation.


1

From your follow-up comments, it becomes clear that what you're really after is a way to recover your root password. This is easy: Reboot your system. When you see the grub menu, hit 'e' to get an editor. in the editor, find the line that starts with linux at the end of that line, add init=/bin/bash. hit ctrl+x to boot the system once with this modified ...


1

If you are getting the permission and other details for gvfs as per the following d?????????? ? ? ? ? ? gvfs then just unmount your gvfs using the following command. Your issue will get resolve after following this process. umount ~/gvfs(umount /run/user/112/gvfs in my case). GVFS (GNOME Virtual File System) is the virtual file ...


1

Don't put the private keys on the system. Users could use, e.g., SSH Agent forwarding and keep the keys on their workstations. Or use a hardware security module (HSM) such as a smartcard (where the hardware refuses to allow you to copy the keys). These both prevent anything on the system (including root) from copying the keys, but root may be able to use ...


1

root (hd0,0) - Configures the root partition for GRUB, such as (hd0,0) first hard disk, first Partition and mounts the partition. kernel /vmlinuz-i686-up-4GB root=/dev/hda9 - Specifies the kernel location which is inside the /boot folder. This location is related to the root(hd0,0) statement.The root partition is specified according to the Linux ...


2

Windows and Linux don't manage administration privileges in the same way. In Windows, system administration tasks can only be performed by processes running at a high privilege level. Normal processes run at a normal privilege level. A user can run a process at high privilege level if their account is marked as administrator; normally, they need to re-enter ...


5

Every account on a Unix/Linux system has a numeric identifier, the "user ID" or UID. By convention, UID 0 (zero) is named "root", and is given special privileges (generally, the permission to access anything on the system). You could just log in as the root user directly, if you have the root password. However, it's generally considered bad practice to do ...



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