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1

On Root privileges You can remove root login, root password etc. You will then need some other way to get admin things done: such as adding users to groups configuring sudo to give fine-grained permissions giving users and programs capabilities. root has recently been broken into a number of capabilities, so where you read that you need root to do ...


3

It's all about risk mitigation; if make does something destructive, you can only lose whatever data was modifiable (or deletable) by the user running it. So you run make as a plain user to limit the scope to that user's files, and you run make install as root because you have to if you want to install to /usr/local typically. Note that in the example you ...


2

It comes down to trust vs convenience. True, make might be insecure, but then so might make install. It's just that the surface attack area should (hopefully) be smaller for make install, and it's more likely a quick perusal of the Makefile will spot anything strange. However, installing software into the $PATH is risky regardless of who has compiled it, so ...


4

Without something like SELinux, root can always write to files; since you're running as root you can always write. If you're not running as root, then the permissions apply; if file exists and is not writable, then > file or >> file will fail. If file does not exist, then it will be created if the parent directory is writable.


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So I also asked for help on the Linux Mint forums and some awesome user solved my problem. Apparently, by using the above command I modified the content of /etc/environment. It should only contain the following: ...


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You'll probably still be able to log in in text mode. Press Ctrl+Alt+F1 and enter your user name and password at the login: and password: prompts, then run sudo -s to get a root shell. If you have a root password, you can log in as root directly. The error looks like a failed attempt to set PATH. It's consistent with having an extra space in an assignment, ...


1

First of all it is indeed a bad idea to use the homedirectory of root for other purposes. Consider a dedicated home directory for the new user, root is always able to access it. Are you indeed looking for setting the homedirectory of the ftp user to the homedirectory of the superuser root or are you looking for a way to safely specify a FTP root (jailed or ...


7

The way to add a directory to sudo's PATH (which, as you found out is not the same as root's), is to edit the sudoers file: sudo visudo Then, find this line: Defaults secure_path="/usr/local/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin:/sbin:/bin" And add your directory to the end of it: Defaults ...


1

These values must match: /etc/rkhunter.conf: ALLOW_SSH_ROOT_USER=no /etc/ssh/sshd_config: PermitRootLogin no Can you confirm that these values are set as above? If so, you should not be warned by rkhunter any longer.


1

That you found a root or Adminstrator account in every OS you looked at is just coincidence (or maybe a result of being new to this all). You don't need that kind of super-user in an OS and many OS don't have such a user or any concept of user at all. e.g. MSDOS. If you (as the OS manifacturer) want to prevent all programs from doing everything without ...


1

Since you want to disable your application to see anything in the root directory, the easiest way is to change your application to check if the absolute rewrite of any path starts with / and take appropriate action. You need to work with the absolute paths to prevent workarounds like ../../.. from some location down the tree. That way you can even easily ...


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I found that the scanimage -L works after I added saned to the group lp, moments after I posted the question. I still am interested in the proper answer to this question (where does the information come from). So, this answer is for future visitors who just want to have it fixed.


1

To generate the encrypted password you can use the perl function perl -e 'print crypt(" ","\$6\$saltsalt\$") . "\n"' which will give: 6$saltsalt$dbMv1WdXXWhYJXZCacilMdWabQOTCkYM.6OIQb/.md67MGEi2mORqm2dx6vAzJ.frP0Nm7m/c8lMQq5OFRTM0/ replace saltsalt by any random string Please note that you cannot put a plain text password in /etc/passwd or ...


0

In short, no. The formats of these files are very specific, and the password field strings are hashes which will have a minimum length of 8 characters, 16 or more on more modern versions that use stronger password hashing. If you're looking for a way to just put in a text string, look at the gecos field in /etc/passwd. If you want a way to have an ...


0

I received the same error when trying to :wq a file on a disk that was completely full. If you receive this message, you may wish to check your available disk space.


0

I'm thinking of an IOPS issue. That usually makes your computer sluggish and eventually freeze. To check it, start the copy process and monitor CPU wait time (wa) using top command: $top top - 13:24:59 up 6 days, 56 min, 8 users, load average: 0.86, 0.65, 0.63 Tasks: 247 total, 2 running, 245 sleeping, 0 stopped, 0 zombie %Cpu(s): 12.3 us, 2.2 sy, ...


2

Here the answers: root has always full access to files and directories. The owner of the file usually has them too, but this is not always true. For example: -r-xr----- 1 user1 users 199 Oct 14 18:42 otherfile.bin user1 is the owner; however he can only read and execute, but root still has full access (rwx) to the file. RUID is the Real User ID and it ...


2

Without any more information than this I am going to guess you are trying to copy a 4.4 GB file to an external drive with the FAT filesystem. FAT can not handle files larger than 4 GB.


2

I think the best way is as is shown in Red Hat documentation. This is your second method. For GRUB2/RHEL7 single/emergency mode should not work since it will use sulogin to authenticate you before presenting the command prompt. So lets mark off different methods. For RHEL5, RHEL6, append 1, s or init=/bin/bash to kernel cmdline For RHEL 7, append ...


7

There are various way to do this. The simplest, and worst, is to have the password in the script as you suggest. Since your computer is not connected to the internet, most security concerns are moot and you could just use sudo's -S option that allows passing the password from STDIN: echo password | sudo -S shutdown -h now A safer approach is to allow a ...



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