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The name “administrator” comes from the Windows world. In the Unix world, “system administrator” is a job description, but “administrator” doesn't mean anything special with respect to accounts. Unlike Windows, Unix accounts do not intrinsically have a notion of privilege. The privileges in an account are conferred by the files that they can access, by the ...


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The ifconfig command is not included in users PATH env variable. So you can either /sbin/ifconfig or modify the PATH variable to include sbin into your users path. Add the following line to your ~/.bashrc export PATH="$PATH:/usr/local/sbin:/usr/sbin:/sbin" source ~/.bashrc using, . ~/.bashrc or source ~/.bashrc or open e new terminal which will source ...


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The sudeoers file is usually located at /etc/sudoers. You need administrative privileges to edit this file. Editing it directly is strongly discouraged: you could irrevocably damage your system in case of syntax errors. The visudo tool is provided with the sudo package for safe editing. It will automatically check file's consistency before saving and abort ...


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So, based on @wurtel's answer and the research I've done, here's the script and the steps I came up with. 1) Unmount the "home" partition umount /dev/mapper/APP05-home 2) Resize the "home" filesystem to a size of 2G resize2fs -p /dev/mapper/APP05-home 2G 3) Reduce the size of the "home" logical volume to 2,1G (the volume needs to be a little bit bigger ...


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Ignore the first "rootfs" entry, the real mount is shown by the /dev/mapper/APP05-root line. To reduce filesystem size, first shrink the filesystem size with resize2fs, and then use lvresize to reduce the device size. To increase the size, use the utilities in reverse order. Reducing the filesystem size needs to be done while the filesystem is not mounted. ...


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You seem to have mounted the wrong partition of the server drive. Unmount it manually (umount /run/media/root/ea53d717-....) and then check how the server drive is partitioned (fdisk,sfdisk, cfdisk, whatever). Then remount the correct partition you just found using mount /drive/partition /media/mountpoint.


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The user name "administrator" is not a reserved name with implied privileges, it is just a user name and I can use it without inadvertently defeating inherent security? You get root privileges by having a user ID number of 0. If the user "administrator" has a different ID number, it will just be a regular user The effects of using the SU command in ...



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