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1

I know that this has already been resolved for OP, but for anyone stumbling upon this question, this seems to be a 10.11 El Capitan only problem. I tried and was able to delete files with this character in OS X 10.4 Tiger and OS X 10.10 Yosemite, so it very likely works on the other ones.


1

rm -rf is not unsafe per se, so go ahead and run it. However, it won't completely work. For some reason, an empty Btrfs subvolume cannot be removed with the rmdir(2) system call. rm -rf will remove all of the contents of all of the subvolumes (regular files, etc...) but the empty subvolumes themselves as well as the parent directories of all those ...


1

Well, I once had a similar problem with yours. I found that your "wa" is high, you could use iostat -x 1 to check whether your disk util is high, if so, it means that your disk is quite busy. Check that whether some other processes are writing to disk continuously. For simpility, use vmstat 1 to check whether b is high or r < b. That indicates ...


0

The linked answer gave me a good start, but was a bit simplistic - it triggered if you had a glob matching 3 files, but not if you were doing rm -rf foo. So this works for me in ~.bash_profile: rmf() { if [ "$1" == "-rf" ]; then read -r -p "Sure you want to delete '${2}' [y/N]? " response if [[ $response =~ ^(yes|y| ) ]]; then ...


1

You are seeing a file named ~ in the Downloads directory; that symbol also happens to refer to your home directory, when used at the beginning of an unquoted string (here is what bash does). To remove the file, you have many options; here are two of the simplest: rm ~/Downloads/~ cd ~/Downloads && rm ./~ Add the -i flag to any of the rm commands ...


3

from man rm use the -v option: -v, --verbose explain what is being done


1

Quoting 'TNW' When find figures out how many 24-hour periods ago the file was last accessed, any fractional part is ignored, so to match -atime +1, a file has to have been accessed at least two days ago. So to find a file that is only a day old, you can use either of the snippets below find /home/backups/* -mtime +0 or find . -mmin +$((60*24))


-1

Have you tried simply renaming the folder to something else then deleting it? A method that has worked for me was to live boot into a Linux environment via CD/USB, dismount the drive with the 'odd' named directory/file, THEN deleting it. This method works most of the time, not every, for me.


3

According to http://apple.stackexchange.com/questions/31734/hfs-private-directory-data that folder is used for filesystem inner workings. You probably can't delete it and, even if you could, it would most likely brick your filesystem.



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