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If syslog-ng is requiring a new version of rpm-libs, then it sounds like syslog-ng was built with rpmbuild, librpmbuild, etc which was compiled from newer source than than the "rpm-libs" package that is installed on your production server. If you have the source to rpm-libs, rpm, rpmbuild, etc that is installed on your server, then you should try to ...


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First part of this question refers to some how to, which is NOT making program available from everywhere -- it is making the program available from that particular init script, which is the correct solution for such task. Second part lists the correct solution to make it available from everywhere. If you see manual pages for bash(1), you can see the ...


0

To execute a shell script a.sh if file a.file exists and is a regular file, you can use this construct: [ -f a.file ] && source a.sh


0

I had archived an empty file and had password set for it. Turns out that 7za would not ask for password when archive contains only empty files.


0

assuming router to 10.58.1.100 is 10.120.0.1, you need to route add net 10.58.1.0/24 10.120.0.1 1 to add route dynamicaly. for change to be permanent, edit /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/route-eth1 add 10.58.1.0/24 via 10.120.0.1 dev eth1


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Remove the gateway setting on eth1. That means 'default gateway', i.e. a gateway which can reach the internet, which you said that one is not. You can add manual routes for the networks which that gateway can reach.


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If you can run the command as root, you can force the change to be accepted. Example: # sudo passwd myusername Changing password for user myusername. New password: Retype new password: passwd: all authentication tokens updated successfully.


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I know this was a very specific problem, but if anyone happens to run into something similar in the future, here's what I did to resolve it: I installed Firefox through ZenWorks (turns out it was prepackaged with the OS) and I managed to get online right away from there. It immediately prompted me for my authentication credentials, which Konqueror did not. ...


0

On a RedHat 7 system you can use the timedatectl utility: https://access.redhat.com/documentation/en-US/Red_Hat_Enterprise_Linux/7/html/System_Administrators_Guide/chap-Configuring_the_Date_and_Time.html For example # timedatectl set-timezone Europe/Rome to set the system time zone (it manages the /etc/localtime symlink) # ls -l /etc/localtime ...


1

Do you mean that you will be cloning them with something like VMware? As a finishing touch on your STIG'd prototype VM, remove the lines HWADDR and UUID from any of the ifcfg-* files in /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/. Shut down the prototype VM. Clone the VM, but do not automatically start the new VM. Turn off the network adapters of the new VM. Start ...


0

Try this: $ yum install --downloadonly --downloaddir=/pkgs/ `cat pkg_list` You can specify multiple package names on the yum command line. The only caveat here is that your command line may become too long for the shell. Thanks


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You don't need to do any sort of sysprep equivalent prior to cloning, but you do need to change the hostname and IP address of each machine after cloning. You may need to make other changes to software you have installed, but as far as the OS is concerned, just change the IP and hostname and you're good to go. Having said that, and not knowing your specific ...


2

It stands for "Block Identification". 1* I general, using whatis can provide info about a command: whatis blkid A block (device) is a file that provides buffered access to hardware. E.g a hard-drive. Futher info: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Device_file#Block_devices Each block device listed by blkid has a unique universal Identifier (UUID). blkid ...


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Step 1 : Download the appropriate version For 32 bit Version download this from terminal: wget http://sourceforge.net/projects/openofficeorg.mirror/files/4.1.1/binaries/en-US/Apache_OpenOffice_4.1.1_Linux_x86_install-rpm_en-US.tar.gz/download -O Apache_OpenOffice_4.1.1_Linux_x86_install-rpm_en-US.tar.gz For 64 bit version download this from terminal : ...


0

Best I can wrt to the killing itself - use regular kill first and give it some time before kill -9. YMMV. There is a Command Line Plugin you can install which allows you to do various things without even starting the IDE, you might want to check if there is something in there to help with a cleaner shutdown: ...


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Try to get familiar with screen. When you connect from remote first start screen and within the screen session start IntelliJ. When you are done working, do not logoff but detach your screen by pressing Ctrl+A followed by d When you want to pick up your work again, from another place for example, you can reattach to the left session by issuing screen -d -r ...


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The only issue was that after the product ID the '*' is still required, so in the end the rule looked like: keyboard:usb:v11AAp11AA* [remapping rules] Simple syntax error.


1

CentOS 6.5 is based on RHEL 6.5. The pattern changed with CentOS 7, which has two releases, one based on RHEL 7.0, the other on RHEL 7.1. You'll find all the details on the CentOS wiki (look for the "Archived Versions" section).


1

Yes. CentOS uses the same major and minor release numbers as the RHEL version they are rebuilding.


1

If I understand you correctly, you simply don't want to run HTTP as root. Either don't have Apache listen to port 80 and use IPtables to redirect those packets to a higher port number; or tell Linux that ports < 1024 are not secure. See the excellent answer at http://unix.stackexchange.com/a/10791/105631. Also here: ...


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My issue was putting the wrong scancode, the rule shouldn't be keyboard_key_1b=playcd but keyboard_key_7003a=playcd You really do require evtest for this (the 'scancodes' provided by showkey -s is not the one you're looking for)


1

Disk slices, as you call them, are typically realised in Linux using LVM. So what you need is to use an LVM based pool, where disk images will be LVs - disk slices at the block level.


4

What you're really doing wrong is duplicating your effort - basically every hardcoded occurrence of _agent or _server appears to be completely redundant. For example, if this is being run on a linux system, you can completely drop the grep_...() functions, and consolidate both check_...s into a single entity which might work like: email(){ mutt -s ...


-1

yum install pyliblzma That installs the package you're missing.


1

You can just repeat the echo for each file with a simple shell command, for example: for file in /sys/class/scsi_host/host*/scan do echo "- - -" >$file done


0

Per a RHEL Support Tech: We strongly recommend updating to the latest kernel and cifs-utils package to mount shares on Windows 8 and newer systems as there's been many improvements made to CIFS in these packages since RHEL's 6.0 release. However, first I'd suggest trying the ntlmssp security mode, which may be required by Windows 8. This is available in ...


0

Sadly (or fortunately, depends how you see it) there's no such thing as selective file removal. What I'd propose is to list the files, the config files marked as such, and the documentation for each package in question and go through the list what you want to keep. Use rpm -ql packagename for listing the files rpm -qc packagename for listing the config ...


3

The offset is the current position in the file, as maintained by the kernel for a given file descriptor (see the lseek(2) manpage for details). As to why it's useful in lsof's output, I'm not really sure. It can give some idea of a process's progress through a file, although it won't cover all cases (memory-mapped files won't show offset changes).


1

In general, you don't. Most intelligent programs deliberately mask or simply do not echo a password being entered. You can always type it in plain text in a terminal window and then use cut-and-paste to enter it, but that's defeating the purpose of masking the password as it's being entered.


0

As @Arthur stated, the problem is the disconnect between what's on the system and what's in the RPMDB. While the RPMDB does indeed have a JDK that it knows is installed, that JDK may not satisfy the package dependencies of the package you're attempting to install - in fact it definitely does not or you wouldn't be getting the particular error message. Where ...


0

It's true that you have a JDK, but it is not in the RPM database, which is used by yum and other similar automatic package managers to know what packages are installed and get there respective versions. The best solution may be running sudo yum install jdk so you can get a version with yum and rpm. You can also consider following its suggestion to add the ...


2

More modern OSes protect themselves from this sort of misuse by default, usually by setting user limits. That's probably why the system is still responsive - it only lets you allocate memory up to a certain amount, which is much less than the machine has available.


1

It sounds like the package(s) were configured so that the httpd.conf file(s) were not declared to be "config" files. See http://www.rpm.org/max-rpm/s1-rpm-erase-and-config-files.html


0

Create this entry in /etc/hosts file: xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx server1 where xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx is the IP of server1. Also, if server1 has public DNS, make sure your /etc/resolv.conf points to 8.8.8.8 and 4.2.2.2: cat /etc/resolv.conf: nameserver 8.8.8.8 nameserver 4.2.2.2 If you do not know the public resolution of server1, then find the private resolution of ...


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is server1 a placeholder for an internet site like, say, www.google.com? Or is it a machine you control on your local network? If it is your own machine, your DNS probably does not know about it. You can get it to resolve via adding a line in your hosts file. If it's a local machine, your options are: add it to every machine's hosts file (these are ...



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