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0

The versions don't match. You have 2.12-1.7, but it's looking for 2.12-7.2. It's subtle, but enough for rpm to freak out. You can pass --nodeps to RPM to force the static package to install. If it doesn't work afterward, just remove the package.


1

Busybox uses static libraries, so you have to install glibc-static (which I think is not in the RHEL6, you'll have to find it) in order to use Busybox with librcrypt.a and not the dynamic version.


0

I had the same need in the past on CentOS 6, and I joined several resources to create a single solution. You can see the answer I wrote in the post I put in stackoverflow.com. Our developers need to work on CentOS 6 as their desktop, and our VCS is Mercurial. Mercurial and TortoiseHG on CentOS 6.5 I hope this helps.


0

The program that can accomplish this is called update-alternatives You should be able to do something like this (untested) update-alternatives --install /usr/bin/mysql-server mysql-server /usr/bin/mysql-5-1/bin/mysql-server 10 update-alternatives --install /usr/bin/mysql-server mysql-server /usr/bin/mysql-5-6/bin/mysql-server 10 --install adds a new ...


5

Use uname: uname -i For more information, see man uname If you get 'x86', it means you have 32 bit Linux OS and if you get 'x86_64', it means you have 64 bit Linux.


2

you can use this command: cat /etc/issue; cat /proc/cpuinfo ; uname -a


1

If you refer to the "comercial" or "human name" (not the kernel) you can do: cat /etc/issue this give you Linux Fedora 13 (Leonidas)


2

The content /proc/version only gives you information about the kernel. It does not directly provide information about the distribution. Linux version 2.6.18-348.1.1.0.1.el5 This is the version of the kernel. 2.6.18 is the upstream version number. What follows is a distribution-specific built number. The el5 suffix at the end is a clue that this is a ...


-1

In my personal point of view, Scientific Linux is a great option (backed up by CERN and fermilab), based on RHEL, years of support,


1

Use chage -l to see a decoded interpretation of the aging information. The user name is expected as the argument. If you are interrogating your own account, no special privileges are requried. Otherwise use sudo chage -l someaccount. When an account is locked, the password field of /etc/shadow will begin with an exclamation point. The remaining ...


1

This looks like Oracle Linux, version 5. Check the file /etc/redhat-release This is an enterprise Linux distribution, largely compatible/comparable with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 or CentOS 5. The idea of the enterprise Linux distro's is to have a long life cycle, 5-10 years, more compatible with enterprise requirements such as stability then bleeding ...


2

To see the distribution/version you are using, you can try: lsb_release -a


1

According to your ouput of cat /proc/version, you are using Redhat 4, the newest version is Redhat 7. AFAIK, you can not run MySQL 5.6 in Redhat 4, it's not supported by MySQL. You can refer to this for more details. Update It's my mistake. You are running Oracle Linux 5.9, according to lsb_release ouput. Oracle Linux 5.9 is fully compatible — both ...


0

Updating an offline machine means finding a way to present the updates to that machine (this will most probably involve an external hard disk or USB stick, to move the files from online machines to the offline systems). In generic strategy terms, you have the choice between the three following solutions: Put the systems briefly online, behind some ...


2

After a lot of searching, I did this, and it works (on Ubuntu Precise, other OS versions may have different package install commands). All the nedit FontStruct errors are gone. :) xlsfonts # Will show no fonts (or the wrong ones) xset q # Shows no font paths apt-cache search xfonts # Find them sudo apt-get install xfonts-traditional # install them # Answer ...


6

Packages and lists in the Debian / Ubuntu repositories are signed by GPG keys. The transport is not secured with SSL (packages are transferred over just over plain ftp or http). I am not that familiar with RHEL / CentOS, but if RPMs are signed too, then the same should apply.


0

As mentioned, that many mails are probably spam. You run a real risk of being blacklisted. ie ALL your mail being blocked on the internet. Read the input from the file. #!/bin/bash while read line do # change this echo to what you want. echo $line; done < "inputlines.txt" You will need to change the input for lines rather than comma's. sed -e ...


0

I do not familier with mailx but I think you can use sed to get the output command you want then using ' | sh ' trick. eg: echo ls -> this cmd will print ls in to console echo ls | sh -> this is equivalent with ls


0

If possible I would consider using a service to send emails to your list. There are a lot of issues to consider in order to make sure your email gets delivered. When you start sending to that big of a list you might easily be classified as spam by people and algorithms alike. I know mailgun and mailchimp are two places that have services like this.


1

Looks like multipath on the Hypervisor refuses to update its maps for LUN sizes. This LUN was originally 28Gb and was later grown to 48Gb on the storage array. The VG information thinks its 48G and indeed this disc is 48G, but multipath won't update and thinks it's still 28G. Multipath clinging to 28G: # multipath -l 350002acf962421ba 350002acf962421ba ...


1

It is possible that some third-party software could check for the existence/contents of that file and do something variable based on the result. So, for example, if something is designed to run only on RHEL and not CentOS, checking that file would be a simple (and FWIW, easy to bypass) way to enforce that. I would be surprised if there is a good reason for ...


1

See devices.txt in the kernel documentation: Major 202 is "Xen Virtual Block Device", major 253 is LVM / device mapper. All your dm-x devices are 253:n; they just point to 202:n. The error message is clear: device-mapper: table: 253:7: xvdb too small for target: start=58714112, len=41943040, dev_size=58720256 It seems there has been a change to the XEN ...


7

With zsh: mkdir -p -- *.doc(:r) Or: for f (*.doc) { mkdir -p -- $f:r && mv -- $f $f:r/ } The bash equivalent (though it will also work in all POSIX shells and zsh): for f in *.doc; do mkdir -p -- "${f%.*}" && mv -- "$f" "${f%.*}/" done (note that it excludes hidden files).


2

Spaces in a file/directory name are fine as long as those names are properly quoted: find . -maxdepth 1 -name "*.doc" | while IFS= read -r f; do mkdir -- "${f%.doc}"; done


2

cd /path/to/dir ( set -- *\ * printf 'd="%s" ; mkdir ./"${d%%.doc}"\n' "$@" ) | . /dev/stdin You can set a subshell's parameters with shell globs and then feed a pipe with printf, and . source the pipe as a script. And if you want to move the files in each directory: cd /path/to/dir ( set -- *\ * printf 'f="%s" ; d="${f%%.doc}" mkdir ...


0

A slightly heavy-handed solution to allow vsftpd access anywhere, would be: setsebool -P allow_ftpd_full_access=1 At that point, vsftpd can go pretty much anywhere on the system...


1

You can usually find selinux denials in /var/log/messages. Try this (as root): grep avc /var/log/messages | grep ftp Review the output and decide whether the denials are erroneous, given your desired configuration. Tune the grep statements as necessary to whiddle the information down to only the statements you want to fix. It's often useful to ...


1

SELinux won't let vsftpd serve files from places other than /var/ftp or write logs outside /var/log on purpose. SELinux is all about disaster mitigation. FTP is fundamentally insecure. Running vsftpd under SELinux is a good idea, because it minimizes the damage an attacker can do if he decides to attack your FTP service. Running a fundamentally insecure ...


0

After learning from a fellow colleague about /var/log/* I took an educated guess that my authentication attempt would be logged in /var/log/secure. And so it was: Apr 1 14:31:21 MYSERVER sshd[11980]: Authentication refused: bad ownership or modes for directory /home/bob Apr 1 14:34:18 MYSERVER sshd[11987]: Connection closed by 123.123.123.123 This error ...


1

I know nothing about cygwin but this tutorial titled: 3 Steps to Perform SSH Login Without Password Using ssh-keygen & ssh-copy-id. It's pretty much how I set things up when I do this. I use the ssh-copy-id command rather than cat, I think its a lot simpler. $ ssh-copy-id -i ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub remote-host


1

So after perusing the manpages looking for how to change the remote port to connect to a virtual machine... I found the answer. All I had to do was adding -o allow_other and bam, it worked. Apparently, sshfs assumes you will read the mounted directory under the same user used to mount it, without considering that usually only ROOT is allowed to mount ...


11

What was wrong in my command line? Nothing. It did what you asked it to do -- removed iptables and, by inference, everything that depends on it. And everything that depends on those things and so on. As Kiwy points out, it is pretty reckless to run a remove -y without having first considered what might happen. I'm sensing some frustration in the ...


1

It seems that you don't register with RHN, so you missed base repo for Redhat to work. You can not get Redhat official packages without register. If you don't have RHN credential, you can use Centos base repo instead. See this link for more details.


0

Yei. It's working. This is what I did: I read this post He comes up with the solution in the end, so I installed: ~]$ sudo yum install gtk2.i686 It's fixed on my Fedora 20 x86_64 KDE, but I reckon it's the same on the rhel 6.5 Workstation. I also needed MonoDevelop, and to get that to work, I installed Fedora 20 KDE on my Rhel machine.


1

Yes vino only, if you don't find, install it using: # yum install vino If you encounter a problem doing so with yum, then try to configure registering it: # rhn-register Of course if you have RHEL licensed, otherwise try creating your own repository. As an alternative, you can also find vino packages on your RHEL media, installing it using this ...


0

I found this link with a similar question: stackoverflow Quote: For installation instructions with apt-get or yum, see: http://software.opensuse.org/download/package?project=home:tpokorra:mono&package=monodevelop-opt I've used this repository on Fedora 20, and I will try it on my Redhat when get round to install the os on another computer For ...


2

I don't know from where you got those links/hosts, but they are dead. Try to replace them with the ones included in the Download via update site section: Add one of the following update sites to Your Exlipse update configuration (Menu: Help->Software updates->Find and Install) http://emonic.sourceforge.net/updatesite/internap/site.xml San Jose, ...


0

So this is how I get information in order to provide explicit dependencies for the spec file: Requires: see my script here; BuildRequires: use auti-buildrequires tool from Richard Jones;


4

Most of this comes from http://wiki.phonicuk.com/Installing-Mono-in-CentOS-5-x.ashx 1) Satisfy the dependencies before compiling mono wget http://dl.fedoraproject.org/pub/epel/6/x86_64/epel-release-6-8.noarch.rpm rpm -Uvh epel-release-6-8.noarch.rpm yum install bison gettext glib2 freetype fontconfig libpng libpng-devel \ libX11 libX11-devel ...



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