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I made a stupid mistake. We had few machines provisioned identically, but one (with this problem) was changed by one of my colleagues. The bad_dir was mounted NFS, which explains all problems. Thanks to Joel Davis which suggest me to check this again I solved my issue.


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The directories need x permission to open. You can probably do, chmod 755 bad_dir and then try your chown command. According to here, the dot at end means, According to ls.c (line 3785), . means an SELinux ACL. (+ means a general ACL.) If it is SELinux messing, use setenforce to modify its mode. Run setenforce 0 to put SELinux in permissive mode and ...


3

It indicates that those files are with SELinux security context. From info ls: Following the file mode bits is a single character that specifies whether an alternate access method such as an access control list applies to the file. When the character following the file mode bits is a space, there is no alternate access method. When it is a printing ...


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You can tell by looking at /etc/redhat-release. Here is how they look like on each system: Workstation: /etc/redhat-release Red Hat Enterprise Linux Workstation release 6.2 Beta Client: /etc/redhat-release Red Hat Enterprise Linux Client release 5.9 (Tikanga) Server: /etc/redhat-release Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server release 5.9 (Tikanga)


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You are running Workstation, Server release says "Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server in /etc/redhat-release. [root@archiware ~]# cat /etc/redhat-release Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server release 6.5 (Santiago) You can also try running rpm -q --whatprovides /etc/redhat-release. [root@archiware ~]# rpm -q --whatprovides /etc/redhat-release ...


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CentOS - install using yum Apache 2.4 for detailed installation process Install Apache 2.4, MySQL 5.5, PHP 5.5 on CentOS/RHEL 6/5


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Ok, so here's the way the boot process works: firmware > bootloader maybe > kernel ${parameters} > initramfs > userspace maybe On a redhat installation disk their dracut system of scripts is what builds and constitutes initramfs and their anaconda installation system constitutes the final userspace. It is udev that handles the device setup - as in, it ...


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go into the BIOS of the host and rearrange the order of the hard drives and removable drives. This will adjust the order as it appears to the Linux kernel.


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run you ip.sh script and setup your iptables make sure you rules are applied iptables -nvL | less save you rules with iptables-save > /etc/sysconfig/iptables


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Increase max number of ulimit open file in Linux 1)Step : open the sysctl.conf and add this line fs.file-max = 65536 vi /etc/sysctl.conf add end of line fs.file-max = 65536 save and exit. 2)Step : vi /etc/security/limits.conf and add below the mentioned * soft nproc 65535 * hard nproc 65535 * soft nofile ...


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First things first. I had setup my 32 bit system as below. /boot - /dev/sda1 / - /dev/sda2 swap - /dev/sda3 /home - /dev/sda4 If you have not setup the /home in a different partition, then you have to backup all the data and restore it. You cannot do as described in this answer. /home is in different partition So if you have /home in different ...


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So I figured out what the problem was: Red Hat's mkbldevs in the init script of the initrd.img was failing to make the block devices. Without any block devices LVM was not able to mount drives. I installed BusyBox and made a custom initrd and while in the shell I noticed that mkblkdevs called by the /bin/nash script didn't make /dev/sd*. I suppose you ...


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and yet on the very top of the file it says.. Hmmm, that's strange. At the top of mine it says: # Manual customization of this file is strongly encouraged. Someone must have changed it ;) And in fact even moved it out of /etc/sysconfig so it would not get "auto uncustomized" by the package manager or anything else ;) ;) I think the point here in ...


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Because the tool called system-config-firewall(or it´s ncurses based brother system-config-firewall-tui) manages this file. Every time you use this tool to create new iptables rules, it will overwrite /etc/sysconfig/iptables. Related Manpage: 28.1.16. /etc/sysconfig/iptables-config This is why it's not recommended, but not prohibited. The best way to save ...


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The big difference is that - gives you the environment of the user you su'ed to. Chances are that you successfully became the support user, but were in your own home, which would explain why you were unable to create directories.


3

Try: yum whatprovides <command> From man yum: provides or whatprovides Is used to find out which package provides some feature or file. Just use a specific name or a file-glob-syntax wildcards to list the packages available or installed that provide that feature or file. Example: yum ...


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If using the Gnome environment in Scientific Linux 6 (or presumably RHEL 6), start a terminal. Go to Edit -> Profile Preferences -> "Title and Command" tab. Make sure that the checkbox "Run command as a login shell" is checked. I found that the Gnome terminal application is ignoring my .bash_profile unless I do this.


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The %pre section(s) of your kickstart run inside the installer environment. Here's a list of helpful commands that are available in the installer environment in RHEL6.5: Shell utils: arch awk basename bash cat chattr chgrp chmod chown chroot clear clock consoletype cp cut date df dmesg du echo egrep env expr false fgrep find getopt grep head hwclock id ...


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Assuming the clones had the same packages installed before you removed python, a sure-fire way to get the list of packages needed would be to compare rpm -qa from each clone. # on clone 1: rpm -qa | sort > clone1.txt # on clone 2: rpm -qa | sort > clone2.txt Get clone1.txt and clone2.txt on the same computer. Then run comm -13 clone1.txt ...


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You may have /var/log/rpmpkgs which has a list of all the RPM packages installed. (in RHEL 6 that list is generated by the package rpm-cron) If you have the list of packages you may look at /var/log/yum.log to see what packages were uninstalled.


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Actually, you can undo a yum command. On the computer with python removed, try running yum history: yum history Loaded plugins: langpacks, refresh-packagekit ID | Command line | Date and time | Action(s) | Altered ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 284 | yum remove python | ...


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I'd start with taking a look at the setup of your system, specifically the contents of the file, /etc/fstab. In there it will show you what partitions are being mounted and how they're being mounted. It's likely the case that with the addition of this new device that it's throwing the device handles off slightly, causing your system not to be able to access ...


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I was using Centos 7. On the install, I hit tab to bring up the install options, and appended "text" on them.


2

Well, I do not expect a concise answer than the one available from here. What I understand about 32-bit OS is, the address is expressed in 32 bits, so at most the OS could use 2^32 = 4GB memory space The most that the process can address is 4GB. You are potentially confusing memory with address space. A process can have more memory than address space. ...


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Make sure bin subdirectories of both packages (libxml2/libxslt) are on your PATH. They contain *-config scripts which are used during compilation of lxml to find out where libxml2/libxslt were installed. [pdobrogost@host /]$ echo $PATH (...):/opt/libxslt-1.1.27/bin:/opt/libxml2-2.6.32/bin:(...) [pdobrogost@host /]$ which xml2-config && which ...


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When we encountered this, our resident ops genius narrowed it down to a slow LDAP server. The short-term fix was to remove the offending LDAP server from the /etc/ldap.conf file.


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If you check what is in /etc/rc0.d and /etc/rc6.d, you will see that before you get to your service, the system will have run first a killall (priority 00), and then a halt (priority 01). Although your service were scheduled to run next, the computer did already halt. lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 17 Sep 28 2012 S00killall -> ../init.d/killall lrwxrwxrwx 1 ...


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You can try (as root), typing in yum install rsh It's probably not installed, since it's old and insecure, but you CAN install it and get it going. RCP/RSH is old and insecure, and designing things to work with it, rather than updating to make use of more current technology, is pointless. Maybe try showing the 'designer' this or even better, show your ...


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I am using CentOS 6.5 and rcp binary belongs to package krb5-appl-clients-1.0.1-7.el6_2.1.x86_64 [root@CentOS-VM1 6]# rpm -qf $(which rcp) krb5-appl-servers-1.0.1-7.el6_2.1.x86_64 krb5-appl-clients-1.0.1-7.el6_2.1.x86_64 My CentOS version -- [root@CentOS-VM1 6]# lsb_release -d Description: CentOS release 6.5 (Final) You can install package ...


3

The file /etc/resolf.conf contains the DNS, without DNS no name resolution add nameserver 8.8.8.8 which is the DNS of Google. before that you can try to ping 8.8.8.8to check if it will work. you should try to find out which DNS are used by your provider though, because using the one of google all the time is not really recommanded


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Putting host names in hosts.allow or hosts.deny means the server must do a reverse DNS resolution to get the domain name for the IP address. This will affect login times if your name resolution system is slow or if some intermediary name server is slow to respond. It is faster to put the IP addresses ur subnets into the file instead, as is explained by man ...


2

I believe in step one it should be: $ cd /etc/yum.repos.d/ not $ cd /etc/yum.repo.d/ At least that's what it is on my CentOS 6.5 system.


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You've installed intltool-0.41.0-1.1.el6.src.rpm. It's a package for building rpm from sources and the information about that package not registered in RPM DB. Look into /usr/src/packages - you can find all the files from src.rpm here. Now you can build binary rpm package: cd /usr/src/packages/SPECS rpmbuild -bb intltool.spec Or simply download and ...


4

intltool-0.41.0-1.1.el6.src.rpm is a source RPM package, containing the source code, patches and build instructions used to make the actual RPM intltool-0.41.0-1.1.el6.rpm package. IIRC source RPM packages get installed in the /usr/src/ sub-directories, but if you weren't planning on building your own packages, you should simply download the correct binary ...


0

You can check output of /proc/version: $ cat /proc/version Linux version 3.14.8-200.fc20.x86_64 (mockbuild@bkernel01.phx2.fedoraproject.org) (gcc version 4.8.2 20131212 (Red Hat 4.8.2-7) (GCC) ) #1 SMP Mon Jun 16 21:57:53 UTC 2014 Example: $ grep -q 'Red Hat' /proc/version && echo "Redhat based distro" Redhat based distro


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If your purpose is to detect whether rpm is the package manager on that system, a good heuristic should be that the RPM package database is not empty. if [ -n "$(rpm -qa)" ] 2>/dev/null; then echo "This looks like an rpm-based system" else echo "Either there is no rpm command, or the rpm package database has no entries" fi


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Just in case anyone else ever has to the same thing I did here, I'll answer my own question. 1) Get the binary DVD iso image from redhat.com 2) Remove unnecessary rpms (GNOME, eclipse) so that it is less than 4GB (this allows it to be stored on a FAT32 filesystem) -copy this iso onto a USB 3) Remove the iso image that comes with the previous bootable USB ...


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The /etc/os-release file contains the ID_LIKE= field, which is for identifying the base distribution that the local OS is derived from. You can check if it contains rhel with grep: cat /etc/os-release | grep ID_LIKE= | grep rhel More documentation on this file: freedesktop.


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I would check presence of /etc/redhat-release or /etc/fedora-release.


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That depends on when exactly you will do this and what is required to install the driver. The most likely answer is no, it won't be a problem. When a live CD is booted, an initial ramdisk is first loaded which contains most of the tools necessary to run your system. If you are at a prompt, these tools are already loaded and you should be able to remove the ...



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