Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

I did something similar to this about a year ago(2 nics, 2 networks, 2 routes). I haven't done it with 2 networks in the same nic, but here's the instructions I followed: http://kindlund.wordpress.com/2007/11/19/configuring-multiple-default-routes-in-linux/


0

Solved by: editing /etc/bashrc # JAVA export JAVA_HOME=/usr/java/java-i386-60/jre/ export PATH=$PATH:$JAVA_HOME/bin


0

Boot from some live medium and perform the xfs_repair from there.


1

Generally when you buy a RedHat license, you get access for one year to their repository. In otherwords, access to RedHat specific packages is by paid license ONLY. Your company should have access to these packages, so you'll have to ask your company systems administrator for registering your system properly to obtain such packages. However, as you know ...


1

Instead of trying to create a user-owned systemd service, I ended up putting ... [Service] ... User=1000 the user directive in the systemd file, which seems to run the service as my user and thus has the same intended result as a user-owned systemd service. My own system remains a mystery to me, however.


0

Try to run systemctl status user@root.service, replace the user root for your user, to start the service just run systemctl start user@root.service (if the service is inactivated).


0

Gilles's answer is (IMHO) brilliant (as always), but since you didn't choose it or even up-vote it, perhaps you find it too complicated. So here are a few (simple) points that might or might not be helpful, and may help you avoid maintaining two separate scripts, which could turn into madness for a large script that has to be maintained over a long period ...


0

For groupremove it would be: yum --setopt=groupremove_leaf_only=1 groupremove 'Development Tools' There's also a patch adding a similar remove_leaf_only option, that modifies remove, but yum in RHEL 6.5 does not yet support it.


1

I just ran into this same issue. Adding the following lines to ~/.hgrc resolved the issue for me: [extensions] hgext.hgk = Then hgk was available using the hg view command.


0

Download all these packages (I took the CentOS 6.6 versions from rpmfind.net) nss-3.16.1-14.el6.x86_64.rpm nss-util-3.16.1-3.el6.x86_64.rpm nss-softokn-3.14.3-17.el6.x86_64.rpm nss-softokn-freebl-3.14.3-17.el6.x86_64.rpm nss-tools-3.16.1-14.el6.x86_64.rpm nss-sysinit-3.16.1-14.el6.x86_64.rpm and install them all in one go with rpm -Uvh nss-*.rpm. That ...


1

cat /proc/mounts|sort|awk '{print $1 "\011" toupper(substr($4,0,2))}' Produces tab delimited output with mount name and mode.


1

You can install just the telnet package and have telnet client functionality. Alternately, you can use the nc command to test port connectivity if you'd rather not mess with telnet at all.


1

Try: rpm -e ca-certificates rpm -ivh nss after reading the package from the NSS Bugfix and Enhancement update page. Copy the package name for your architecture into Google and end up here at the NSS List on RPM Find Continue with the yum update This should recheck all the dependancies. If they all pass reinstall the new ca-certificates. Don't be ...


2

You can modify in the file /etc/sysconfig/init , the field BOOTUP Like : BOOTUP=verbose It should work at the next reboot. Cheers.


3

You can either use the Time Zone Configuration tool GUI: # redhat-config-date or use the command line utility: # timeconfig Either way, you need to set the timezone to Etc/GMT-5


0

Try to narrow down your problem. check dmesg to see if there's something obviously wrong. Does the internet connection come back up? if not, how do you get it back up? Are you using dhcp or static ip? is it configured on /etc/network/interfaces ? if so, post your config


1

If you read /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifup-eth you'll see that networking uses DHCP if BOOTPROTO is set to dhcp or bootp, otherwise it's not used: if ["${BOOTPROTO}" = "bootp" -o "${BOOTPROTO}" = "dhcp" ]; then DYNCONFIG=true Further down, if DYNCONFIG is not null (and dhclient is available) then the scripts attempts to use DHCP otherwise static IP ...


1

When you started your installed HD image, you didn't add -bios ss5.bin to the command line like you did during the installation and also you didn't add -nographic. This means QEMU would have used OpenBIOS instead of the Sun OBP ROM used for the installation which have different device trees that may confuse the OS. I would highly recommend sticking with one ...


0

If you just want to display X (client) applications you should consider the Xming X server for windows. If you want to be able to use the RHEL desktop you can either use a remote desktop based protocol. You will have to enable this on your server (and that is assuming it has the Desktop packages installed). Another approach is installing a virtual machine ...


0

You should log out, and then log in to a terminal-only environment. But if you don't care about preserving the current state of the GUI environment you can instantly kill X windows with Ctrl-Alt-Backspace. I'm not very familiar with the modern Red Hat environment, but I assume that when X is killed it's restarted and you are then presented with the graphical ...


-1

# chcon ---reference=/var /hulk or else changing the SElinux mode to either permissive or disabled.


1

First of all, if your distribution supplied or installed a default named.conf file that references those zone files, they should definitely exist on your system. Maybe you should reinstall the package? (or did you install from source?) If your DNS server is authoritative only (You are talking about resolving external domains so I don't think this is the ...


0

It looks like your IBM server has a GPT partition table and anaconda - the installer - doesn't support GPT disks in your version. You need to decide whether there is anything on the disk that is needed. If not, you need to completely wipe the disk and start again. The generic way to do this would be: Boot with the install media, enter linux rescue mode. ...


2

When grub goes to stage 2, it will present the kernel selection menu. The best way to configure this is to use either the SAN disk or the local disk as your MBR (master boot record) then update the /boot/grub/grub.conf file to include both stanza entries from the local HDD and the SAN disk. Then use the default=0 entry to set the default OS kernel to load. ...


0

The wtmp and utmp files are binary files - not ASCII. Therefore you'd expect to see non-ASCII data. If you wish to read them, use the last command. If that command works, then the file is OK. An example of the format can be found in man 5 wtmp, which can be read here. That page also mentions this: Note that the utmp struct from libc5 has changed in ...


1

That is a binary file that get read by e.g. last (it defaults to /var/log/wtmp, you can also specify another target with -f). So whether there is a last sensible entry completely depends on how last implements access to the file and how it uses them (a fixed number of records with a fixed length accessed in a round accessed in a robin fashion is e.g. one ...


1

You can reboot the computer with a terminal command, but you can't give it a terminal command that tells it what device to reboot into. Once the machine reboots control is passed to the BIOS, which then decides what device to boot from. Some BIOSes will automatically offer to boot from a bootable CD/DVD if it detects one, but not all. So when the machine ...


0

"We changed something in the script" There is not enough information to authoritatively answer this question, since the contents of my-service-start.sh and my-service-stop.sh are a mystery. Assuming everything you have said is true, then the case is that my-service-start.sh does not function as intended, once my-service-start.sh and my-service-stop.sh ...


1

Fixed it. What did i do: Fill up the rhsm.conf file with proxy settings ( /etc/rhsm/rhsm.conf ) rebooting the machine try to install: root@mymachine:~# yum install -y openmotif22.i686 openmotif22.x86_64 -> fail, same error yum clean -all -v yum repolist -v root@mymachine:~# yum install -y openmotif22.i686 openmotif22.x86_64 -> worked ... No idea why, but ...


2

From man mount: mount -a [-t type] [-O optlist] (usually given in a bootscript) causes all filesystems mentioned in fstab (of the proper type and/or having or not having the proper options) to be mounted as indicated, except for those whose line contains the noauto keyword. From systemd.mount documentation: noauto, auto With noauto, this ...


2

After a lot more reading I found the solution that works for me. I read this guide, Running Services After the Network is up. A little quote from the guide: This will ensure that all configured network devices are up and have an IP address assigned before boot continues. This is exactly what I wanted so I enabled this service and set the a dependency ...


0

Since RHEL 5 suffers from the same problem, I just checked their bugzilla: https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=1152789 They focus pretty much on Tomcat 6 and their JBoss stuff, where this boils down to changing a few lines in the application server config. But within that bugzilla there is a thread leading to the openssl-problem of RHEL5. ...


1

If your company policy allows you to use CIFS then please make sure cifs utility is installed. # lsmod |grep cifs cifs 293313 3 if not then install it # yum install samba-client samba-common cifs-utils or # yum install cifs-utils After installing CIFS utility you should be able to find mount.cifs command. To mount while booting ...


2

First, why? In the docs for s_client it's stated that openssl will by default use a handshake that figures out the correct protocol for you. This is the whole basis of the POODLE attack. The issue is that in 0.9.8 that handshake starts off with SSL_V23 and at some later point will try TLSv1 . Many servers don't like it when clients connect using SSL_V23 ...


1

You can use a programming language to open a socket and roll-your-own library, using the modbus spec. Otherwise you can use an existing library, I have no experience with any of them, but this looked promising: http://libmodbus.org/documentation/


1

After you configure the ip address run the following commands 1.service NetworkManager stop 2.chkconfig NetworkManager off it will retain the provided ip even after booting.


1

For automated installs of RHEL or distributions based on this, use Kickstart. When you build a RHEL server a /root/anaconda-ks.cfg file is created that can be used to build a duplicate host. There are various options, the two most suitable: 1. Custom Live CD / removable media build from the kiskstart image. 2. Full PXE boot network installation. The ...


3

The last string should be FOOEMPLOYEES ALL = (ALL) NOPASSWD: FOOCOMMANDS From the man sudoers The basic structure of a user specification is “who where = (as_whom) what”


0

I was recently investigating this same issue for a friend, in the context of POODLE. If you use the latest (AORN) httpd24 build from October 2013 on epel, you will get TLSv1.0 and TLSv1.1 by default. However, as soon as you set SSLProtocol in apache to anything else sensible, you will lose these protocols because of the openssl headers httpd24 was ...


3

The minimal install likely did not come with the bind-utils package, which I believe contains nslookup. You can install bind-utils with: sudo yum install bind-utils In general, you can search for what package provides a command using the yum provides command: sudo yum provides '/usr/bin/nslookup'


1

If you are not writing your own software but want to start/stop existing service, than like @jasonwryan wrote, RHEL/Fedora are using systemd. The command for handling services is systemctl. systemctl start/stop/restart servicename If you want to list the installed services, use: systemctl list-units


0

Look at /etc/rc.d/init.d You'll have a few services there to examine. You can also test the service script by checking the status of your net work with: $ sudo service network status


1

I think you are mixing things called tar-balls (when referring to multiple folders), with regular installation packages (files ending in .deb on Debian/Ubuntu and in .rpm on Red Hat/Fedora/SuSE). The former is "only" a, often compressed, directory structure with some instruction (in the form of scripts, Makefiles, configuration files) to get the files ...


0

You likely have a stale lock. A reboot would remove a stale lock (and a stale futex), so would "rm -f /var/lib/rpm/__db*" or "cd /var/lib/rpm && db_recover -ev". If still hanging, use -Uvv instead of -Uvh to find out operation rpm is trying to perform. From the -Uvv output, rpm is finding the size of mounted file systems. You likely have an NFS ...


0

For me, a similar error with sftp ls failing via chroot, and sftp get succeeding, was solved with copying /etc/group and /etc/passwd to my chroot. No files from /dev seem necessary. No changes in /etc/nsswitch.conf seem necessary, although I do chroot to remote cifs mount.


0

In my case, I have a proxy:port settings. I edited the /etc/yum.conf file, but forgot the port number after the proxy= entry. proxy=http://your.proxyhost.org:8080 I was seeing this exact error as stated above, so I rechecked the yum.conf file and added the correct port and it works.



Top 50 recent answers are included