Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

The net.core.wmem_default and wmem_max settings control the initial and maximum sizes of TX socket buffers in bytes. While the queue itself is just a linked list of skb pointers, the kernel also keeps track of the total byte-size consumed by the skb's as they're added and removed from the socket buffer. The wmem_default sysctl sets the default initial ...


0

I discovered iscsi error messages in /var/log/messages. And then I stopped iscsi and iscid daemons. After that yum completed the update process.


0

You are just using ln the wrong way around: ln is ln <source> <target>. So you could do: ORIGINAL="$(which firefox)" sudo mv "$ORIGINAL" "${ORIGINAL}.orig" sudo ln -s "$HOME/Desktop/firefox/firefox" "$ORIGINAL" This will backup the current firefox binary from your path and create a symlink to your manually installed version.


3

Easiest way apt-get install firefox this will update to new one or which firefox this will give you path of firefox then replace the same sudo ln -fs $HOME/Desktop/firefox/firefox /usr/bin/firefox For Ex. which firefox /usr/bin/firefox sudo ln -fs $HOME/Desktop/firefox/firefox /usr/bin/firefox


3

There are two ways to fix this: You can alter your $PATH variable so that the directory where the new firefox version lives is checked before any other directory, by running the command export PATH=$HOME/Desktop/firefox:$PATH And if you add that same command to your .bashrc, all your future sessions will have the new PATH too. You can use ln to symlink the ...


1

Why you downloaded the version, you apparently did not install it in one of the directories in the PATH variable. When you execute simply 'firefox' it will find firefox in the first directory using the PATH directory. If you execute firefox with a more fully qualified name it will use whatever is found in that SPECIFIC directory only. The easiest thing to ...


1

There's a standard custom script /sbin/ifup-local. It is called for each adapter. My script obtains the ip and hostnames and adds them to /etc/hosts #!/bin/bash # /sbin/ifup-local set -e fn_get_ip() { ip addr show dev "$1" | sed "s,.* inet \([^/]*\)/.*,\1,;t;d" } fn_aaa() { ip=`fn_get_ip "$1"` hostnames=`hostname | sed "s,\([^.]*\)\..*,\1 &,"` ...


0

Have you tried disabling the "firstboot" service? chkconfig firstboot off (assuming RHEL6) should disable it. You can also add firstboot --disable to your kickstart to disable it during kickstart.


1

As Hauke Laging said, systemctl enable ... will print out information about what is being done. For instance, on my Arch system, if I enable the dhcpd service on interface enp0s3... $ systemctl enable dhcpcd@enp0s3 Created symlink from /etc/systemd/system/multi-user.target.wants/dhcpcd@enp0s3.service to /usr/lib/systemd/system/dhcpcd@.service When ...


2

It's here buried in a table on the Fedora Project's site, on a page titled simply: Red Hat Enterprise Linux.      


5

You can use the following unit file as a template: [Unit] Description=A Test Service That Prints the date After=network.target [Service] EnvironmentFile=-/etc/sysconfig/myservice ExecStart=/usr/bin/bash -c "/usr/bin/date >> /now.txt" $MYSERVICE_ARGS [Install] WantedBy=multi-user.target Save it in /etc/systemd/system/ with a .service file extension ...


0

In the end, I sourced the .bashrc from the .profile. For me, this means the .profile must be empty except for running .bashrc to avoid circular references and other confusion. As I've read in the man page, sshd should have invoked the .bashrc, but, oh well, I have a workaround.


0

There is a package called yum-utils, which you can install with: yum install -y yum-utils Once this is installed you can enable and disable repos with this command (assuming they're already installed): yum-config-manager --enablerepo=repo_a (where repo_a is the name of the repository you wish to enable.) There is an important note about repositories ...


1

Who ever is managing this box hsa done a pretty big no no. You're mixing YUM repositories that are offering the same packages. Notice these lines, for example: Error: Package: perl-core-5.10.1-136.el6.x86_64 (@anaconda-RedHatEnterpriseLinux -201311111358.x86_64/6.5) ...


1

The ~/.bashrc file does not always get read: see Bash Startup Files in the manual. Does your ~/.bash_profile (or ~/.profile) invoke your .bashrc file? Often this appears in .profile files: # if running bash if [ -n "$BASH_VERSION" ]; then # include .bashrc if it exists if [ -f "$HOME/.bashrc" ]; then . "$HOME/.bashrc" fi fi


4

It's not quite that SIGTERM isn't working, it's that the application doesn't react to it the way you are hoping. Generally, the purpose of catching SIGTERM is to do some tidying up, such as syncing data to disk, etc., before exiting. There's no enforced requirement, however, that the process actually exit, so if something goes wrong during whatever it does ...


0

You can prepare a minimal install inside a qemu KVM instance and then transfer the image to the remote system. For example to install a RAID-1 Centos 7 system: On you local workstation: $ truncate --size 5G disk1.img $ truncate --size 5G disk2.img $ qemu-system-x86_64 \ -cdrom CentOS-7.0-1406-x86_64-DVD/CentOS-7.0-1406-x86_64-DVD.iso \ -hda ...


3

A crontab created with crontab -e and listable with crontab -l should not have a user specified for the command. Your entry should read: * * * * * /home/test.sh Or alternatively put the line that you have in /etc/crontab instead. From man 5 crontab (section EXAMPLE SYSTEM CRON FILE): # /etc/crontab: system-wide crontab # Unlike any other crontab you ...


0

You could try the daemonize command, which is available from the EPEL repository. It seems to do most of what you require here.


1

Based on this snippet it sounds like the answer would be no you cannot do this and still see the files from the initial mount. Excerpt NFS filesystems appear to be "normal" filesystems on the client, which means that they can be mounted on any directory on the client. It's possible to mount an NFS filesystem over all or part of another filesystem, ...


0

This is a Shell solution that won't require external utilities other than ps if [[ `ps --pid $PID -oppid=` = $PPID ]] then : still running else : not running fi


0

Recovering data from formatted drive or from a deleted partition is a bit of possible thing. But recovering data from drive which was formatted and then written upon is not possible, since data might be overwritten and accessing the old data is impossible now. Though you could try your luck with testdisk utility. But sorry, as far as my knowledge it won't ...


2

As httpd is working as a front-end, then clients connecting to the service will be communicating with httpd and not tomcat; httpd takes care of forwarding the request to tomcat and passing the response back to the client. When you implement SSL then the logical place for doing that is in httpd; hence httpd is where the SSL processing needs to be done. Only ...


0

Sorry to write this as an answer, I can't comment yet. I'll be interested to see what the fsck turns up. If you create another hard link to the file, does that hard link have the same problem? At least then you can rule out issues with the file reference...


0

Hopefully your support case is already resolved, but just in case, try: yum clean all yum repolist -v yum check-update This should at least give you a little more information to work with.


0

There's actually a bug in RHEL 5.8, mentioned in https://access.redhat.com/documentation/en-US/Red_Hat_Enterprise_Linux/5/html-single/5.8_Technical_Notes/index.html: When installing Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.8 on a machine that had previously used a GPT partitioning table, Anaconda does not provide the option to remove the previous disk layout and ...


0

Can't comment on the thread above because my rep is too low, but, the question was, "Why does telnet work, and nc not?" I suspect what's happening here is that telnet converts to Windows style line breaks, CRLN, and nc doesn't. You can convert it by running the command like this: | sed -e "s/$/\r/" | nc localhost 3333 Or you should be able to get it to ...


2

You can at least find out what's wrong by running: xfs_repair -n /dev/mapper/rhel-root -n runs xfs_repair in no-modify mode. If it's complaining about it being mounted and writeable, you might want to try re-mounting it read-only (mount -r -o remount <device>), but this will probably just come back with '/dev/mapper/rhel-root is busy'. I'd go with ...


0

Another way su -c 'echo "systemctl poweroff" | at 06:45'


19

You can use shutdown: sudo shutdown -h 06:45 & And to check it: ps -aux | grep shutdown If you want to cancel it: sudo shutdown -c This assumes of course that the shutdown time has already passed.


33

You should use the at command: $ sudo at 6:45 [sudo] password for root: warning: commands will be executed using /bin/sh at> poweroff at> <EOT> Don't type the <EOT>, but press Ctrl+D at the second at> prompt. The significant advantage of using at over using shutdown with a TIME argument, is that it involves real, persistent, ...


0

Using one ps option and further filtering with grep or awk is a reasonable approach. Do pass the -o option to ps and limit the fields to the ones you need. Use an equal sign after each field name to suppress the header line. If you don't need the command name, don't include comm or args, which could include newlines (and in any security-sensitive context, ...


0

I just checked, it seems CentOS 6.6 pgrep doesn't have the -F option, so this isn't applicable. I'll leave this answer here since it might be useful in other cases. pgrep might be what you want: -P, --parent ppid,... Only match processes whose parent process ID is listed. -F, --pidfile file Read PID's from file. This option is perhaps ...


0

A more complete set of firewall rules that is based on a similar setup that I have for incoming ssh traffic. Do make sure that any existing iptables rules are flushed before testing. iptables -A INPUT -m state --state ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j ACCEPT iptables -A OUTPUT -m state --state ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j ACCEPT iptables -A FORWARD -m state --state ...


0

For incoming ssh connections (without connection tracking) iptables -t mangle -A OUTPUT -p tcp --dport 22 -j MARK --set-mark 22 For outgoing ssh connection (without connection tracking) iptables -t mangle -A OUTPUT -p tcp --sport 22 -j MARK --set-mark 22 You should be able to combine them both using --port instead of --dport and --sport It would ...


0

I did something similar to this about a year ago(2 nics, 2 networks, 2 routes). I haven't done it with 2 networks in the same nic, but here's the instructions I followed: http://kindlund.wordpress.com/2007/11/19/configuring-multiple-default-routes-in-linux/


0

Solved by: editing /etc/bashrc # JAVA export JAVA_HOME=/usr/java/java-i386-60/jre/ export PATH=$PATH:$JAVA_HOME/bin


1

Boot from some live medium and perform the xfs_repair from there.


1

Generally when you buy a RedHat license, you get access for one year to their repository. In otherwords, access to RedHat specific packages is by paid license ONLY. Your company should have access to these packages, so you'll have to ask your company systems administrator for registering your system properly to obtain such packages. However, as you know ...



Top 50 recent answers are included