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3

Your choice of distribution really depends on what it will be used for, and who will be administering it. RHEL and CentOS are both based on same core, however RHEL comes as a paid, supported, enterprise-level product. If you need the support of an SLA and the amazing team at Red Hat, that would certainly be a good option. Personally, I am more familiar ...


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The packages named gpg-pubkey* are fake RPM packages to store and manage the rpm keys. The manpage rpmkeys(8) mention how to list and remove those keys. There is also a YUM addon (package yum-plugin-keys): $ yum keys Key owner Key email Repo Key ID CentOS-7 Key (CentOS 7 Official Signing Key) ...


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The Linux Kernel 2.6 and above supports unsigned 32-bit integers as UIDs and GIDs. This means the maximum UID should be 4294967294 (4294967295 is reserved) for RHEL4+ but it may depend on the system settings and utilities installed, specifically shadow-utils. You can test it out by trying a large UID, the only thing that would happen is it will reject it ...


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All Unix systems have at least 16-bit user IDs, which can take values from 0 (reserved for root) to 65535 (reserved as an invalid value). Many modern flavors (including Linux) support larger values, but in a mixed network, you should avoid these unless you're sure that all operating systems, filesystems and network protocols support them (e.g. older versions ...


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Create LVM volume group on sdb. Create logical volume with XFS in the volume group. Copy your data. Verify your data is in good condition on the new filesystem. Add sda8 to the volume group. Extend logical volume to span the new size. Run xfs_growfs on the XFS.


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If you want more recent software, you probably should use some other distribution. RHEL is an enterprise distribution, and does not ship the newest software, probably because it is more throughly tested to shake out all the bugs. Upgrading the installed Boost version may or may not be an option, depending on what other packages in the distribution depend on ...


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Just add all needed commands to sudoers separately: %webteam cms051=/usr/bin/systemctl restart httpd.service %webteam cms051=/usr/bin/systemctl stop httpd.service %webteam cms051=/usr/bin/systemctl start httpd.service %webteam cms051=/usr/bin/systemctl status httpd.service


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It's safest to itemize them as jofel suggests. If I wanted to allow someone to use a limited subset of a command's abilities, I would not trust wildcards in a sudoers line to do it. Even if the language was more expressive than shell globs, there are just too many corner cases to keep track of. The "service httpd *" line is relatively safe because (verify ...


1

I have in the past used RHEL and CentOS (a binary compatible clone built from RHEL sources) for my desktops/laptops. The issue I regularly ran into was that the driver support was not as bleeding edge in these distributions so my newer hardware was not always recognized or usable. Since I work on RHEL servers every day, I want to stay as close as I can to ...


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I was just able to fix the solution and compile on CentOS. It appears that when I entered yum install gcc.x86_64, it did not include the g++ libraries. Once I added yum install gcc-c++.x86_64, it worked. You show ensure that the gcc-c++ package is installed.


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You can access this from a linux computer that has journalctl installed using: journalctl --file system@xxxxxxxx.journal You can dump the database to text for reading on your mac or windows machine with: journalctl --no-pager [file] > journalfile.txt


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So, I narrowed down the 22k files to one in particular which stack dumps. I probably could have found this sooner except I didn't realize until I only had a singleton file -- createrepo doesn't output any processing info until AFTER it completes the header check info. Since that failed, the rpm file listed above the error WAS NOT the file which failed, but ...


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yum search also looks at installed packages, use "yum search -v" to get the extra information (like where it was found). My guess is that you have these installed, but not available, you can easily check this with "yum list extras" (or better "yum list distro-extras", but I don't think that's in el6).


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So the answer was that minimum installations of RHEL don't include ksh which is my default shell. I use ksh because of compatibility issues with our HP-UX machines that don't have Bash. Why the miminum install doesn't install all the basic shells is something that baffles me. I think I deserve to be downvoted to hell for not checking the secure log earlier. ...


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You could use the repoquery command, for example. repoquery -i nmap


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This yum plugin adds the "--merge-conf" command line option. With this option, Yum will ask you what to do with config files which have changed on updating a package. https://apps.fedoraproject.org/packages/yum-plugin-merge-conf


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Interesting fact: swap usage increased from 0 to 8GB... meanwhile, not a single byte were written to disk (sar's pswpout/s show 0). So my assumption is that the swap was allocated/reserved, but not consumed/used. My best guess is that your server uses vm.overcommit_memory=2 (read vm.overcommit_memory documentation, vm overcommit-accounting). In which case, ...



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