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4

What you're really doing wrong is duplicating your effort - basically every hardcoded occurrence of _agent or _server appears to be completely redundant. For example, if this is being run on a linux system, you can completely drop the grep_...() functions, and consolidate both check_...s into a single entity which might work like: email(){ mutt -s ...


3

The offset is the current position in the file, as maintained by the kernel for a given file descriptor (see the lseek(2) manpage for details). As to why it's useful in lsof's output, I'm not really sure. It can give some idea of a process's progress through a file, although it won't cover all cases (memory-mapped files won't show offset changes).


2

More modern OSes protect themselves from this sort of misuse by default, usually by setting user limits. That's probably why the system is still responsive - it only lets you allocate memory up to a certain amount, which is much less than the machine has available.


2

It stands for "Block Identification". 1* I general, using whatis can provide info about a command: whatis blkid A block (device) is a file that provides buffered access to hardware. E.g a hard-drive. Futher info: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Device_file#Block_devices Each block device listed by blkid has a unique universal Identifier (UUID). blkid ...


1

Source packages are not added to the rpm database, so they will not show on query. Probable location is ~/rpmbuild/{SOURCES,SPECS} with SOURCES containing the package sources and distribution patches while the SPECS subdirectory containing the .spec file being used to build the package (see rpmbuild (8) man page for details). If you can't find the sources ...


1

Do you mean that you will be cloning them with something like VMware? As a finishing touch on your STIG'd prototype VM, remove the lines HWADDR and UUID from any of the ifcfg-* files in /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/. Shut down the prototype VM. Clone the VM, but do not automatically start the new VM. Turn off the network adapters of the new VM. Start ...


1

You can just repeat the echo for each file with a simple shell command, for example: for file in /sys/class/scsi_host/host*/scan do echo "- - -" >$file done


1

CentOS 6.5 is based on RHEL 6.5. The pattern changed with CentOS 7, which has two releases, one based on RHEL 7.0, the other on RHEL 7.1. You'll find all the details on the CentOS wiki (look for the "Archived Versions" section).


1

Yes. CentOS uses the same major and minor release numbers as the RHEL version they are rebuilding.


1

If I understand you correctly, you simply don't want to run HTTP as root. Either don't have Apache listen to port 80 and use IPtables to redirect those packets to a higher port number; or tell Linux that ports < 1024 are not secure. See the excellent answer at http://unix.stackexchange.com/a/10791/105631. Also here: ...


1

Disk slices, as you call them, are typically realised in Linux using LVM. So what you need is to use an LVM based pool, where disk images will be LVs - disk slices at the block level.


1

In general, you don't. Most intelligent programs deliberately mask or simply do not echo a password being entered. You can always type it in plain text in a terminal window and then use cut-and-paste to enter it, but that's defeating the purpose of masking the password as it's being entered.


1

It sounds like the package(s) were configured so that the httpd.conf file(s) were not declared to be "config" files. See http://www.rpm.org/max-rpm/s1-rpm-erase-and-config-files.html



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