New answers tagged

7

In increasing order of helpfulness: if you identify a bug, report it with as much relevant information as possible (to make it easy for the maintainers to reproduce and then fix). If you can read the source and identify where the bug occurs, include that information. If you are able to provide a patch that fixes the bug, include that (or open a pull ...


2

This depends if you are using RHN Classic or the newer Red Hat Customer Portal Subscription Management/RHSM. RHN Classic utilized a plugin for YUM, there was a /etc/yum.repos.d/redhat.repo file but it was auto-generated. The newer Subscription Management/RHSM does use the file /etc/yum.repos.d/redhat.repo and it populated similar to normal YUM repos, an ...


2

I haven't used RHEL in quite some time, so I can't answer how it's done these days. But if I recall correctly, on RHEL 6, when you subscribed to a channel, no file was created in /etc/yum.repos.d/. Instead, there was a plugin for yum to connect to RHN, and that plugin knew which channels you had subscribed to, and told Yum how to use those channels as ...


3

In Solaris 10 there are no repositories. You do have patch bundles (available under support contracts) that include all the patches. Alternativaly you might use smpatch. Software packages are provided as standalone and might have dependencies. Unfortunately with Solaris 10 package manager you need to solve these dependencies manually. With Solaris 11 you ...


0

Let me throw a brick to attract some jade here. dnf list all | less shows all packages(including installed and available packages). The output has two sections: "Installed Packages" and "Available Packages". All "Installed Packages" are preceded by @ sign, while "Available Packages" are not. So I believe @ signs show the packages are installed. If a package ...


1

Solved. I am speechless. I had made a quick check for a ~/.git-whatever file using bash autocompletion (tab), it did not work so I blindly assumed the issue was somewhere else. Patrick's comment shed the light: I carefully checked using ls -a ~/, the ~/.gitconfig he wrote about really is here, and it holds the information regarding the remote: $ cat ~/....



Top 50 recent answers are included