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This is normal. APT clients try to get translation packages for the repository. Is the normal behavior. You can either, ignore the message, disable the message reporting (sadly reprepo doesn't allow this) or configure your clients to not ask for the languages packages with Acquire::Languages "none"; line in your apt.conf file. There isn't a method for ...


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run sudo yum clean all then run sudo yum update and the system should now have all updates and software new to the server.


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Using Git in this manner is a really bad idea. It's not meant to store binary data, so every time you revision an identical image you'll be keeping both copies (old + new). Plus it's not really the fastest thing for moving this type of data around. If your heart is set on the Git interface you could use git-annex instead. It makes use of the Git U/I but ...


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apt never searches directly under pool, it only looks if referred from dists/kali/main/binary-amd64/Packages or whatever.


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For completeness sake, here are all possibilities: urpmq --dump will show the interpreted configuration from /etc/urpmi/urpmi.cfg , one repo per line: [doktor5000@Mageia4 ~]$ urpmq --dump local-noarch /home/doktor5000/rpmbuild/RPMS/noarch local /home/doktor5000/rpmbuild/RPMS/x86_64 "Core Release (distrib1)" ...


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It's been my experience that no, createrepo cannot recursively walk a directory tree. You therefore have to flatten your repo's directory structure. I usually use this type of looping construct in my repo building script. destdir="/path/to/my/yum-repos/Fedora/14" for arch in i386 x86_64 noarch; do printf "\n\n==== creating repo: %-50s [%-s]\n" $destdir ...


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This is pretty pervasive information on the internet, assuming you know what to search for. You need to setup a local YUM repository using server1. Details are described here: Setup Local Yum Repository on CentOS / RHEL / Scientific Linux 6.4 The general approach is that you'll need either an FTP server or HTTP server which can access the directory where ...


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No, not necessarily. There is no easy way to test. You can download the rpm/deb, extract the contents of the rpm/deb and look for any files that will be added to the repolist of the system, or look for any scripts included in the package that will do the same. To extract contents from a rpm rpm2cpio anyrpmfile.rpm | cpio -midv To extract contents from a ...


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No. The only method I'm aware of is to interrogate the package looking for repository files. Example With RPMs you can interrogate a package like so: $ rpm -ql rpmfusion-free-release-19-1.noarch | grep yum.repos.d /etc/yum.repos.d/rpmfusion-free-rawhide.repo /etc/yum.repos.d/rpmfusion-free-updates-testing.repo /etc/yum.repos.d/rpmfusion-free-updates.repo ...



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