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33

I would assume most distros accept individual private donations (they may also accept free hosting). However, that is probably not the bulk of their financing in most cases. Note that some of the major distros may have some paid staff, and possibly also office space, the cost of which likely exceeds that of hosting the repos1. This should not be taken to ...


25

Usually each Linux distro has a few central servers were they put directly all the packages. But there exists mirrors arround the world that have copies of these packages. These mirrors comunicate directly with the central servers looking for updates periodically. Normally there is a delay in the release of an update between this central servers and the ...


10

deb lines are relative to binary packages, that you can install with apt. deb-src lines are relative to source packages (as downloaded by apt-get source $package) and next compiled. Source packages are needed only if you want to compile some package yourself, or inspect the source code for a bug. Ordinary users don't need to include such repositories.


9

Debian packages are checksummed, and the checksums are signed by a key in the Debian keyring. The apt package manager ensures that the downloaded package has the correct checksum and that the checksum file was signed correctly.


9

On AskUbuntu there is this question which may of help The repositories for EOL Ubuntu releases are archived, so http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/dists/ was moved to http://old-releases.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/dists/ (raring-updates is here) - basically all you should need to do is replace archive.ubuntu.com & security.ubuntu.com in the software sources ...


7

Package sources are listed in /etc/apt/sources.list and /etc/apt/sources.list.d/*.list. Usually you would list official sources in the main file /etc/apt/sources.list and add third-party repositories in /etc/apt/sources.list.d/indicative_name.list. If you installed from CD-ROM, there'll be a line with deb cdrom:[some name]/ stable main Remove it or ...


7

RPM file is not repository. It is type of package that is used in CentOS (and Red Hat and some other distributions). Repository is place that packages are kept and can be downloaded and installed by package manager in your distribution. Another package format is DEB. It is used by Debian, Ubuntu and their derivatives. There are also other formats, but that ...


7

You can also find complete information at the man page for that file: man sources.list


7

At the end of the day yum is just a glorfied http downloader, so you can determine the actual URL that it's using to download a package and attempt to do the same using curl or wget and see if the slowness is being induced by the mirror site or something else local to your system. You can use the repoquery to see the URL of one of the RPM packages like so: ...


6

You can use repotrack instead like this: repotrack -a x86_64 -p /repos/Packages [packages] Unfortunately there is a bug with the -a flag (arch). It will download i686 and x86_64. Here's how to fix it: if opts.arch: #archlist = [] #archlist.extend(rpmUtils.arch.getArchList(opts.arch)) archlist = opts.arch.split(',') # Change to this else: ...


6

You can use apt-cache search. For example to search firefox: apt-cache search firefox This is the according snippet from man 8 apt-cache: search regex [ regex ... ] search performs a full text search on all available package lists for the POSIX regex pattern given, see regex(7). It searches the package names and the descriptions ...


5

http://www.opensource.apple.com/static/iso/darwinx86-801.iso.gz


5

This isn't a direct answer to your question, but there are several things you can do to mitigate against this risk. The simplest one is to check your downloaded packages against the checksums from a different mirror than you downloaded from. When my package manager (poldek) downloads a package, I have it set to keep a copy of the downloaded rpm in a cache ...


5

Use a meta package (e.g. linux-image-2.6-686), depending on which you want to use. This is so that if the real package name changes (which is very often), you won't lag behind. To determine which meta package to use, have a look at the name of the kernel package you are running. Also, do read the package descriptions of the meta packages that seem like the ...


5

Your question made me think of this letter by Debian's founder Ian Murdock :) In theory Debian will use the exact same package management system that Ubuntu does. If the words apt-get or Synaptic sound familiar, then you already know how to use Debian's packages. As a matter of fact, most of the packaging is done by Debian's developers, and Ubuntu will ...


5

Apparently Debian does not have something like Launchpad PPA, since latest packages can damage system's stability. Instead it has a separated approach (assuming one is running the stable release and in the order of decreasing stability): Backports. Here one can find somewhat newer but not the latest version of some packages without compromising the ...


5

I don't know how to list all packages and their repositories, but for a single one you can just execute apt-cache policy <package>. The line with the *** is the currently installed version with the corresponding repositories. Setting the priority of a particular source is called apt pinning and can be done via /etc/apt/preferences (newer Ubuntu ...


4

I don't think it's a good idea to import a Fedora repository - regardless of version - into RHEL6 or another Linux distribution derived from it. Those packages are not tested for working together and different compilation options and patches might introduce subtle incompatibilities even between packages with the same name and version. What you can do is ...


4

You seem to have the freshrpms repository installed and enabled, but as http://freshrpms.net/ says, since Fedora 10 almost everything has moved to rpmfusion so you probably don't need it anymore and should switch to rpmfusion. The specific cause of your error is simply that the freshrpms repository doesn't have any content for Fedora 15. You can probably ...


4

Fedora packages are signed and checksummed. Even 3rd party repositories such as rpmfusion sign their packages. Yum (the package manager) requires a special flag (--nogpgcheck) to install packages which haven't been signed.


4

Other than snapshots, it looks like you have a complete list. As a sidenote, there is a list of non-official repositories.


4

You can use the addremove command to mark missing files (those prefaced with a !) as removed. See the excellent Mercurial: the Definitive Guide chapter on tracking files. For future reference, there is a command to move files, hg mv.


4

That's simply not true. I'm posting this from FF 8.0.1, installed directly from the repos (Arch), and at work I have 8.0 (Ubuntu 11.10). Ubuntu (and maybe others) sets in stone the major versions of the software in each release's repo at its release, so that no incompatibility arises if one package doesn't support another's new major version and it doesn't ...


4

Most of the repositories specify a mirrorlist in their configuration file. When present, yum will select one or more of the mirrors provided by the list. Repos that don't have mirrors will have baseurl instead of mirrorlist. When downloading multiple packages, yum can download from multiple sites in parallel, though this isn't always obvious in the terminal ...


4

Regarding safety I'd say they are even more unsafe and more likely to break your system than they are on Ubuntu. Consider a badly written package, that does not list the correct version of a required library as a dependency and therefore installs, but doesn't run. Now imagine what happens if this package is a core system component. So, if you're planning to ...


4

You can use yum to do the installation too. $ yum --nogpgcheck localinstall *.rpm Yum will then make sure that the dependencies are all set before attempting to install. It will even look into the proposed .rpm files you're attempting to install to make sure that their dependencies are satisfied. In general it's usually a bad idea to attempt to install ...


4

The short answer is no. The Unix security model is fundamentally designed to isolate one user's data from other users. It is not designed to confine applications. All the applications that you run have the same privileges. Your file manager can obviously read your files (that's the whole point) and it has network access too (e.g. to mount remote shared ...


4

As of right now, December 6th, 2013, 16:00 UTC, Scientific Linux hasn't released version 6.5. Redhat, CentOS and Oracle have released their 6.5 updates, but SL has not. Historically I'm under the impression they take a bit longer than CentOS and Oracle to vet the RHEL changes and port them over to their release. https://www.scientificlinux.org/


4

Most of the time big company like Intel IBM AMD ... If you look at Ubuntu that's the canonical company that handle the bandwidth. For source forge lots of universities offers bandwidth and once again big company like phone operators (free in France for example). Centos gives a list of bandwidth sponsor on this page http://www.centos.org/download/mirrors/ ...


4

With regard to Debian, companies using Debian donate servers and bandwidth. I think the Project also uses monetary donations to purchase hardware, particularly specialist hardware. You can find discussions of this on the Debian mailing lists. However, I've never heard of Debian paying for bandwidth. Presumably they can find enough ISPs to let them use ...



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