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3

Like the accepted answer, I don't think this is possible directly. However, I see at least two ways to still accomplish your goal. Running vim remotely ssh user@myserver sudo vim /some/file This has disadvantages: Your interactions with vim go over the network. Significant lag will be annoying, and if your connection dies, so does vim (eventually). ...


2

You would need the root password or have your public ssh key in ~root/.ssh/authorized_keys. Once you had that, you could probably do vim scp://root@nagios//tmp/notouch Bottom line: this is effectively just a shortcut for scp root@nagios:/tmp/notouch /tmp/notouch vim /tmp/notouch scp /tmp/notouch root@nagios:/tmp/notouch If you have the necessary access ...


7

I'm going to say this is not possible because vim is not executing remote commands. It is simply using scp to copy the file over, edit it locally and scp it back when done. As stated in this question sudo via scp is not possible and it is recommended that you either modify permissions to accomplish what you're wanting or just ssh across to the remote machine....


2

telnet was the traditional way to get a remote shell on a networked unix machine. rsh was the other. ssh is a relative newcomer in comparison. telnet typically talks to a remote telnet daemon (or "server" process). At that point you authenticate with a username and password to login and then you get a shell. So, yes, it's a method of getting a remote ...


1

suggestion: zfs send > file scp file server-at-site2: ssh server-at-site2 zfs receive < file ssh server-at-site2 cat file | ssh second-server-at-site2 zfs receive That requires two transfers, but presumably the second will be faster (because local network, etc)


1

There seems to be something going wrong in mussh. I can reproduce your problem and will fix it in the next release. As a workaround, I recommend you use the following. eval $(ssh-agent -s) ssh-add /home/the_user/.ssh/key mussh -d -H hostfile -c ' sh script-to-bring-back-log.sh' -m2 eval $(ssh-agent -k)


1

Yes, use your PC as a proxy. There are many ways to set up a proxy on your PC and there are many ways how the server can access your PC to use that proxy. It all sort of depends what you had in mind. Here two examples. One option is to use openssh on your PC to provide a socks5 proxy for the server to connect to. Server uses ssh with the "-D" switch to ...


0

Sadly, 4 years after google promised a Linux client for google drive, there is still none from them. However, you can use drive or gsync.


0

"grive2" is a command line tool that can be used to do a sync between the local filesystem and google drive. It's not automatic like some GUI tools, but it works pretty well. There appear to be PPA's available for Ubuntu which may make it easier to work with: http://www.webupd8.org/2015/05/grive2-grive-fork-with-google-drive.html


2

Nowadays, on a correctly-configured system there shouldn't be any way of determining this. On a badly-configured system, you might see different behaviour when attempting to log in depending on whether the user you're trying to log in as exists or not. (Hopefully not in the messages returned, but perhaps in the timing of the responses.) In the past, finger ...


0

You can try to use local ports forwarding too, as described here. But I'm afraid that you'll need a VPN service here to achieve that because of two hope SSH tunnel in your case.



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