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I had the same problem, but for me the solution was different. My user was not configured to use bash as shell, it used zsh as shell instead, therefore the bash dot files were not run at login. Open /etc/passwd with a text editor and look for your username and what shell it uses: root:x:0:0:root:/root:/bin/zsh This is how my user entry looks. Notice it ...


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If connecting to a windows pc, I type: Xfreerdp --sec tls #this will prompt for the password when connected. You can add your username and domain to the same line: -d contoso.com -u bob If you want to make the display full screen: -f I hope this help you guys. /cheers.


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What do the log say? Connection established. followed by ssh_exchange_identification: Connection closed by remote host means the connection between the client and the server was established but ssh couldn't start. In my humble experience this is often caused by whether TCP_wrapper blocking SSH: check that the rules in the files /etc/hosts.{allow,deny} on ...


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Then use expect: expect -c 'spawn ssh serversuser@server' \ -c 'expect "serverprompt" {send /path/to/your/script\n}' \ -c 'expect "Enter application password to run the script:" {send yourpassword\n}'


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What about screen ? screen - screen manager with VT100/ANSI terminal emulation Open the terminal with screen. Run you command and you can close the terminal. You can then reattach if necessary.


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This should be a comment to the above answer but I don't have enough rep... To make moving files via a SSH session more robust I would urge you to use screen (or tmux or something similar). Otherwise you risk your SSH session being interrupted (network glitch, power glitch on local system, accidentally close PuTTY window, Windows goes into ...


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If you use GNOME or KDE: open file manager press Ctrl+L to focus address bar enter sftp://host/ and press Enter (replace "host" with your target host) The file system of the remote host will be displayed in file manager now, and you can navigate to your target directory and double-click the file to open it. As far as I know you can now use any local ...


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If you want to use GUI programs installed on the remote machine, you can forward remote display to your local PC. $ ssh -X user@example.com Now open a remote file using a GUI editor installed on remote machine $ geany ~/Documents/file.txt


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You can mount the remote directory with sshfs, after that, the file is accessible in your local directory tree. Example: sshfs user@domain:/remote/directory/ /local/directory/ It's all in the man pages. Or just copy the file over with scp/rsync, edit it, and copy it back.


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If you are familiar with vim, you may use it as follows: vim scp://user@host:port/file_path_and_filename Make sure not to forget the "/" character before the filepath; otherwise it won't work; for example: vim scp://user@192.168.1.4:2243//home/user/my_file You can skip the portnumber if is the same of the default on your ssh_config file


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During a ssh session you can just open the file with an editor, for example vi/vim or nano. $ vi file.txt If you're not sure how to use these, check the manpage.


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Doesn't gksudo /.../myscript.sh do everything you want (assuming you're running Gnome)? – Ken Sharp ... actually that does seem to work! Looks like this is an example of the mysterious problems mentioned here http://www.psychocats.net/ubuntu/graphicalsudo


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To work around the temporary IP address allocation, you'll want to look at dynamic DNS. Find a domain registrar that supports dynamic DNS, then each of you register a domain name and follow the registrar's instructions for setting up automatic updates of your IP address. This will allow you to connect to your friend's computer (or vice-versa) without having ...


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You did not provide a reason why you need to achieve this, so my answer may not have the solution you need. But the simplest way to share a terminal with another user is to use tmate, which is a fork of tmux. Tmate allows you to initiate a session (open your terminal and start tmate), which will provide you with 2x connection strings; a read an write ...


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You can bind to 0.0.0.0, so that MySQL will accept connections to any IP address that exists on the host, including 127.0.0.1. Local clients can usually also connect via a unix socket; check the config for a socket: line. That may be a viable alternative to using 127.0.0.1. Make sure that the MySQL users have sufficient privileges from the client IP they ...



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