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1

After some research, I ended up with this. I also applied it to my own server: sudo apt-get install ntp sudo dpkg-reconfigure ntp ntpq -p If the last command shows a valid list of servers, you are good to go. The command will run a quite complex set of algorithms which will iterate your clock drift, among other things, and compensate for them. You will ...


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The obvious answer for "remote shell" used to be telnet (urgh!). It seems that these days there is an SSL-enabled version of telnet, readily available on debian as: telnetd-ssl (I have to admit though, that I don't know anything about it as I've always been happy with ssh; given the bad reputation of telnet (mainly based on it's non-encrypted nature) I ...


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Drop bear might work. It does use the SSH protocol, but it doesn't share a code base with OpenSSH, so it probably won't crash in the same circumstances. I'm pretty sure you can configure both OpenSSH and Drop Bear to listen on ports other than TCP 22.


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On the honeypot, you would modify the rsyslog.conf to forward messages (all of them or just the ones that match a pattern) to the host. The host needs to be running a syslog server (ie: listener) like syslog-ng or any of the myriad of options out there. On the host's syslog configuration file, you will want to also write an action to take all the incoming ...


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You can find the rsyslog.conf under the following path: /etc/rsyslog.conf You can simply edit it with vi! At the moment I'm not sure what you want to do with the data! So if you want to forward the data to another Server then you have to edit the configuration of the client and the host! (You need a listener and a sender)... If you need more help then I ...


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http://github.com/hughperkins/securewebcmd is another possibility (disclaimer: I wrote and maintain it). can execute arbitrary commands, though you can whitelist the allowed executables if you want keeps a full history of what was run, along with results uses nodejs, so quite lightweight to install and run, doesnt need apache etc


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You can write a bash script that uses rsync to sync/copy your config files or folders and run it after you change something. example: $ rsync -az --progress --size-only /home/test/* server.example.com:/home/test/destination/ explained: -a archive, preserves all attributes like recursive ownership, timestamps, etc -z compress, saves bandwidth but is ...


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I had the same problem, but for me the solution was different. My user was not configured to use bash as shell, it used zsh as shell instead, therefore the bash dot files were not run at login. Open /etc/passwd with a text editor and look for your username and what shell it uses: root:x:0:0:root:/root:/bin/zsh This is how my user entry looks. Notice it ...



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