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As suggested in a comment, Why can't I run Gnome apps over remote SSH session? is a similar issue, similar cause. When you try to run konsole, it attempts to make a connection to the remote D-Bus server, and fails (because that is not running). As for the warning messages, those are known, and associated with long-term problems in KDE which have apparently ...


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SSHFS lets you mount a remote filesystem on your local machine. It relies on SFTP as the communication protocol, so if the server allows SFTP, you can use SSHFS. Your client machine must support FUSE which is the case of most modern Unix variants, including Linux, OSX, *BSD, and Solaris. mkdir myserver sshfs username@server.example.com:/path/to/directory ...


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You could get a different client. For instance with lftp (lftp sftp://user@host/dir): glob eval -f 'get "$0"' file_0722_* However, you cannot use that if file names may contain backslash, double quote or newline characters. If you don't have control over the names of the files, then it becomes a command injection vulnerability (for instance, a file named ...


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For this use-case, I comfortably use afuse, a FUSE-based sshfs auto-mounter[1]. On my setup it is (re-)spawned by a few simple lines of shell-script[2] sourced by ~/.profile. The script is basically a slightly fleshed out version of: if <detect if afuse is not running> then <start it with correct params> [1]: afuse is available in the package ...


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Solved. I am speechless. I had made a quick check for a ~/.git-whatever file using bash autocompletion (tab), it did not work so I blindly assumed the issue was somewhere else. Patrick's comment shed the light: I carefully checked using ls -a ~/, the ~/.gitconfig he wrote about really is here, and it holds the information regarding the remote: $ cat ~/....


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When you run an interactive shell it sets the PATH variable according to your "rc" files (e.g .bash_profile). When you run that "non-interactive" ssh command then many of these scripts aren't run and so PATH isn't set. You should include the pathname to pm2 even if it is the current directory (eg ./pm2 or /path/to/pm2) to ensure it is found, or else export ...


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Like the accepted answer, I don't think this is possible directly. However, I see at least two ways to still accomplish your goal. Running vim remotely ssh user@myserver sudo vim /some/file This has disadvantages: Your interactions with vim go over the network. Significant lag will be annoying, and if your connection dies, so does vim (eventually). ...


2

You would need the root password or have your public ssh key in ~root/.ssh/authorized_keys. Once you had that, you could probably do vim scp://root@nagios//tmp/notouch Bottom line: this is effectively just a shortcut for scp root@nagios:/tmp/notouch /tmp/notouch vim /tmp/notouch scp /tmp/notouch root@nagios:/tmp/notouch If you have the necessary access ...


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I'm going to say this is not possible because vim is not executing remote commands. It is simply using scp to copy the file over, edit it locally and scp it back when done. As stated in this question sudo via scp is not possible and it is recommended that you either modify permissions to accomplish what you're wanting or just ssh across to the remote machine....


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telnet was the traditional way to get a remote shell on a networked unix machine. rsh was the other. ssh is a relative newcomer in comparison. telnet typically talks to a remote telnet daemon (or "server" process). At that point you authenticate with a username and password to login and then you get a shell. So, yes, it's a method of getting a remote ...



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