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You remove a disk from the array; the array needs rebuilding when it's re-added. The rebuild is automatic, but can take time. However the rebuild time can be minimised if you have a write intent bitmap set on the volume. If the number of changes are small enough then when the disk is re-added it will effectively do a recovery by bringing the "stale" disk ...


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Problem #1. I can query the dives for their serial numbers but I can't seem to find out which array sdh was originally apart of, with the hope I can add it back to the correct array. Use mdadm -E /dev/sdh1 (examine). Then you can use mdadm --re-add ... or --add. Also, if your other disks are in good health, you can simply rebuild this disk even though it ...


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I managed to assemble my raid in the end. This is how you do it: mdadm --assemble --update=devicesize /dev/md2


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I don't have enough rep to comment, but I want to point out that the mdadm system in Linux DOES NOT correct any errors. If you tell it to "fix" errors during a scrub of, say, RAID6, if there is an inconsistency, it will "fix" it by assuming the data portions are correct and recalculating the parity.


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Losing any member of RAID 0 array makes any file extraction almost impossible as you are missing a quarter of all the information that was previously stored, including the superblocks and directories. If you have very important text documents, a text extraction could be done to retrieve 3 quarters of what you had, which could actually be automated by a ...



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