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2

TL;DR sh->sector is the number of sectors in the physical disks after the start of the data section Setup Here's a simple test setup to illustrate: /dev/raidme/rd[0-3], 2GB devices /dev/md127 created as a raid5 over these 5, init'd as xfs and filled with random data Now to get started, get a non-zero block and overwrite it # dd if=/dev/raidme/rd0 ...


1

Fortunately, you only have 160GB of data on your pool. If you have a directory on another filesystem with enough free space to store ~160GB of backup data, or less with compression, (I'll use /var/backup/ in my example), you can: First, kill any processes that might be writing anything to stuffpool. Kill crond and atd etc too, if there are any cron etc ...


5

Okay, you have made a bit of a mess for yourself, but it looks like it's fixable. The first mistake you made was to zpool add the new drive, instead of zpool attach (attach an additional device to a mirror) or even better zpool replace with the old device still present in the pool metadata. The correct way to replace the device would have been to # zpool ...


1

Looking at the partition table for /dev/loop0 and the disk image sizes reported for /dev/loop0 and /dev/loop1, I'm inclined to suggest that the two disks were simply bolted together and then the partition table was built for the resulting virtual disk: Disk /dev/loop0: 298.1 GiB, 320072933376 bytes, 625142448 sectors Device Boot Start End ...


0

Your procedure is correct. Your terminology could use small detail work though. You want to declare the second,new disk to be a member of a new degraded RAID1 array. Then boot with a liveCD, dd the Data over, and then declare the first,older disk to be a mirror of the above array. Depending on how exactly GRUB locates the RootFS, you may need to edit your ...



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