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For some reason, your initramfs is failing to start your RAID array. That could mean it just wasn't configured to, or that it was somehow generated wrong. Since you're able to boot from a recovery disk, you can easily change the setting and regenerate it using the following commands: dpkg-reconfigure mdadm. You should be asked which arrays to start in the ...


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Plug your usb drive and use udevadm info -a -p /sys/block/sd* where * is your disk assigned number(sda1,sda3,sdb2,etc) Then wrote a udev rule like this KERNEL=="sd*", SUBSYSTEMS==" block", ATTRS{serial}=="**************", SYMLINK+="sdb%n" Of course edit this based on udevadm info Another good solution is to use DISK_UID or LABEL for mount,then ...


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In a VPS you do not usually install GRUB. GRUB loads the kernel (among other things). If you have an OpenVZ or similar environment, you do not load the kernel. The kernel is shared between containers. You also do not update the kernel -- and it will, in fact be write-protected from your updates. In a VPS which is based on KVM this is a different matter. ...


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If you know the array UUID, then mdadm --assemble /dev/md0 --uuid <uuid> (note the slight difference in parameter order) will do what you want: scan all unused volumes for ones that have md metadata for the given UUID. Other options: mdadm --assemble /dev/md0 --name <name> (does the same thing as --uuid, but with an array name instead of a ...


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Yes, you need to stop the array before removing the disks. In general, the order of operations is this, where completing each step makes it possible to do the next step: Stop any programs using filesystems on the array. Unmount all filesystems on the array. Stop the array. Power down the array disks. If you're using LVM, there's a step 2.5 where you ...


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Currently I can think of three advantages: ZFS has a 'self-healing' mechanism which only works if redundancy is performed by ZFS. ZFS has two tools (zpool and zfs) to manage devices, RAID, pools and filesystems from the Operating System level. This way you can easy replace devices (if they are hot swappable), manage new pools and so on. ZFS allows dynamic ...


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You can see the UUIDs for the various different components (physical disk, RAID, etc.) by running blkid Here is a sample from one of my systems: /dev/sda3: UUID="NAzDnw-zu08-iSt9-v76l-njNc-NElx-8RFzVg" TYPE="LVM2_member" /dev/sdc3: UUID="215b625b-8531-26ed-c610-01f443697250" UUID_SUB="087e72db-ff75-bcbe-5b41-8f79a6bb54f5" LABEL="server:3" ...


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The UUID you use in the /etc/fstab is for identifying the filesystem on the raid (it was created when you formatted your raid). The UUID you see in the /etc/mdadm.conf is on every device (disc/partition) that is part of a particular raid to identify it, for mdadm that these devices belong to a particular raid. That UUID is created when the RAID is created, ...


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there are two 2Tb hard disks in RAID. Is there any way I can format them to one single partition on both drives and mount them to lets say /media/attachment For the purposes of this answer I am using /dev/sda and /dev/sdb. It is your responsibility to ensure that this matches your situation. You can do this provided you are happy to erase all the data ...


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You want to have 2 separate disks or still in RAID1? For the first one use mdadm to remove the disks from the raid configuration and the you can use fdisk to create a partition on each of them. With LVM you then can combine them to 1 disk of 4TB.



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