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11

In general, the difference from a user perspective should be purely cosmetic. Qt and GTK set themes independently (via, e.g., qtconfig or gtk-chtheme) but this is harmonized by some desktop environments. GNU/Linux tends to be more GTK oriented than Qt in the sense that the former is more commonly used, so you may want to prefer it when given the choice; an ...


7

No, there is no difference in the internal structure of such programs. GTK and Qt are user interface toolkits and frameworks. They are libraries that the developers use to design graphical interfaces. When a graphical (GUI) program is written, first its core internals are developed. This is what makes the program run. You never see the core, they simply ...


6

This works for me. Might not work with all applications and all window managers. The pam format is at least supported by ImageMagick, so you can view it with display and convert it to other formats if need be with convert: xprop -notype 32c _NET_WM_ICON | perl -0777 -pe '@_=/\d+/g; printf "P7\nWIDTH %d\nHEIGHT %d\nDEPTH 4\nMAXVAL 255\nTUPLTYPE ...


5

Ok I've found the solution : mount the directory using cifs rather than smbfs, and it works ! I added the following line to fstab : //windows-computer/share /home/jj/smbShare cifs username=jj,password=***,perm,iocharset=utf8,uid=jj,gid=users,nounix,noserverino 0 0 To avoid putting your Windows password in the fstab file, you may use a credential ...


4

You want libguestfs. You can use it via guestfish or guestmount, or use the library directly through its C interface or any of the many language bindings, like Python.


4

Your root file system (which by the way is extremely small, even considering that you have /home, /tmp, /usr and /var elsewhere) is practically full; that exact df invocation reports 24 MB free on /, which adds up well with the 23.87 MiB reported by the wizard. I'm guessing this is because parts need to go into locations outside of the supposed installation ...


4

One application is using GTK2 and the other is using GTK3 (unless I'm mistaken). Thus, you need to switch to a theme with both GTK2 and GTK3 components. One theme that supports both is Phenix, but if you search you can find many others. Most GTK3 themes on OpenDesktop.org also support GTK2. As for Qt, install qtconfig (I'm sure Arch has some version of it ...


4

This isn't necessarily Unix/Linux specific, so you are probably better asking this on Stack Overflow. Never the less, QtCreator is usually quite good at detecting alternative Qt installs, just create a new project and look under the Projects tab on the left. You can set different build configurations there. There should be a drop down box to select from the ...


4

qtconfig no longer exist in Qt5. Qt5 applications will use the current desktop settings by default, but it doesn't work perfectly. For instance I'm using XFCE and it doesn't automatically set the style to Gtk. The style can be set with the -style command line option, for instance -style=gtk . Or you can use a specific Qt stylesheet with -stylesheet. You ...


3

Found a solution which works for GTK apps (but not Qt). One needs to set XMODIFIERS="@im=none" to let X11 handle dead keys. Thanks to @PabloSaratxaga for his answer.


3

I don't know where you got the idea that doing a make clean before a make install was somehow something you should be doing. The canonical INSTALL file for autotools spells out the process: ./configure make make check (optional) make install make installcheck (optional) At item 6, it says: You can remove the program binaries and object files from ...


3

The problem is that cron runs in a text environment. There are a few different approaches for that, depending on what your machine is running. set a display variable: * * * * * DISPLAY=:0.0 /home/my-user-name/Documents/bin/program set up a password-less ssh key-pair and do * * * * * /usr/bin/ssh -y user@localhost ...


2

You can develop with the Qt SDK on all the distros where it is available (and compile the open source edition often enough when it's not directly packaged, provided you can use that license). What the primary desktop environment is based on is largely irrelevant (you could develop non-GUI Qt apps on a headless server if you felt like it). What you can ...


2

Your question is a bit strange, since QtCurve is a Qt/KDE theme already. If you want to build your own theme based on that, the easiest thing to do is to download its source from kde-look.org, start by building it without modifications to make sure you've got that part right, then start changing things progressively. If you want to write a Qt style ...


2

I have found a solution here. I have installed libgnomeui and now everything work.


2

You need superuser privileges to be able to mount. But those could be given to you by setuid helper commands like sudo, mount or fusermount. In /etc/fstab, and admin can grant some mere users to mount specific FS. Some users can be allowed to mount filesystems via fuse (for instance, if the FS is ext, you may be able to use fuseext. Or maybe you can do ...


2

Concerning this one the following comes into my mind. You can add a line to your /etc/fstab for the device you want to mount as a user with normal privileges. An example line would look like /dev/mydevice /mnt/directory auto rw,user 0 0 With this line a normal user can mount mydevice to /mnt/directory and additionally can read from- and ...


2

Have a look at /etc/X11/xinit/xinitrc (this may be different places on different systems) to see what files it sources. Generally, this will have an if..elif..else structure, so that only one initialization file is read, with $HOME/.Xclients prioritized then /etc/X11/xinit/Xclients. That's almost certainly where the terminal that appears comes from (I am ...


2

I tried your script, with latest (2.4) version there was no problem, If you forget to terminate the QProcess before closing main window of your program, you usually get this warning, I think the author has fixed that problem: QProcess: Destroyed while process is still running. texstudio doesn't release the pesudo tty when it's started, so deleting of ...


2

Just found a solution: OpenSUSE Menu → Settings → Settings Manager (graphical settings manager for xfce4). In Appearance → Fonts: Check Custom DPI setting and set an appropriate value (96 in my case). Now, Qt-Based app's have readable fonts! I remember doing exactly the same thing in the KDE desktop (checking custom DPI) but that did not ...


2

You have installed qt5-qmake, but your Qt Creator is looking for the Qt4 version of qmake. You can either install qt4-qmake or add your Qt5 qmake executable to Qt Creator in Tools -> Options -> Build & Run -> Qt Versions. /edit after an update in the question: Qt Chooser is a tool to automatically select the correct Qt binaries depending on its ...


2

This works as expected out of the box on my system. You don't seem to have your sudo configured to allow you to run graphical applications. I haven't encountered this issue in quite a few years but one of these should work: Switch off access control for X xhost + sudo ./qt-opensource-linux-x64-1.6.0-5-online.run Then, activate it again with xhost -. ...


1

You can add the command to the $HOME/.xinitrc of the user which starts the X server. Need to be an executable $HOME/.xinitrc shell script (first line #!/bin/sh and chmod +x $HOME/.xinitrc).


1

This is a way of persistent configuration. It is described for example here https://wiki.edubuntu.org/ComposeKey#line-66 . I configured compose keys with ~/.XCompose this way. I have checked this both on ubuntu and debian systems.


1

Just to add a little detail: OpenSUSE 12.2 is using libQt 4.8.1, while Tumbleweed and Factory (12.3) are using libQt 4.8.4. There will be no need to perform a major version upgrade to Qt5 in the foreseeable future. Equally, as harish provided; KDE4.10 does not require Qt5; so if you are running an installation of openSUSE Factory (which will receive Qt5 ...


1

First of all, you can take a look at the versions available for the package you want to upgrade with this command : apt-cache show qt4-desiger | grep Version You can also use http://packages.debian.org/search?keywords=qt4-designer You can then force the installation of a given version by doing : apt-get -uVf install qt-designer=4:4.8.2+dfsg-2 ...


1

As far as I have understood the situation with LXDE, they are not 100% sure to switch to Qt. Since there will not be any further development on GTK+ 2, they have to choose between GTK+ 3 and Qt. It looks like there will be two version of LXDE one with Qt and the other with GTK+ 2 or 3, until they decided which to choose. To answer your question, today you ...


1

Given it's developed using the GTK+ Toolkit I would assume that developing using GTK2 would make the most sense. excerpt from LXDE wikipedia page LXDE is written in the C programming language, using the GTK+ toolkit, and runs on Unix and other POSIX compliant platforms, such as Linux and BSD. GTK+ is commonly used in many Linux distributions and ...


1

Ask pkg-config. $ pkg-config --modversion gtk+-2.0 2.24.18


1

I would start with this query on the Qt website. The first link goes to the 4.8 documentation but you can go to that page and change the URL so that it goes to 4.7 to see the supported platforms/architectures that Qt supports. http://qt-project.org/doc/qt-4.7/supported-platforms.html I would do additional searches on the qt-project.org website to see how ...



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