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16

It turned out that the additional package python-minimal had python installed. One does then not only have to do: sudo apt-get remove python but also: sudo apt-get remove python-minimal


8

Unfortunately, I have no Debian at hand to test, but anyway: I think you did not really uninstall python. Package 'python2.7' is not installed, so not removed only means that a package python2.7 is not installed. But perhaps the name is different. which python says /usr/bin/python. That is a clear sign that you have python installed. Here is the official ...


5

You should probably look at the output of dpkg --get-selections | grep python to see all the installed python packages. There are a few packages for various different releases that may be installed on a system. Keep in mind that python is in the standard selections, so fully removing it will also remove other 'standard' packages like reportbug.


4

#!/bin/sh - urldecode() { python -c "import sys, urllib as ul;print ul.unquote_plus(sys.argv[1])" "$1" } str="this+is+%2F+%2B+%2C+.+url+%23%24coded" decoded=$(urldecode "$str"} printf '%s\n' "$decoded" That is: avoid aliases in scripts as that's not guaranteed to work (some sh implementations like bash ignore aliases when non-interactive) quote your ...


2

I personally believe that one the very first things that you have to do in a command-line script or application is setup a logging system. Just with a couple of re-usable lines, you can have logging on all your python applications and even use different debug levels :). I wouldn't base logging in writing stdout to files with tee, just log to both stdout and ...


2

Fix the path so it's correct. Based on your comment it's likely to be /root/snmp_codes/snmp/snmpstats.py. You can also modify the command so that it captures stderr as well as stdout like this (the 2>&1 attaches stderr to stdout so you get both written to the logfile.log): * * * * * /root/snmp_codes/snmp/snmpstats.py -f file -g > logfile.log ...


1

This appears to be related to the default shell, which is dash not bash. ls -l /bin/sh Based on this answer given by @Gilles, you could try changing the first line of your configure script. Change this #!/bin/sh to #!/bin/bash See also this from the Linux Mint forums. You can verify the default shell with this command. readlink -f /bin/sh ...


1

As per the official docs (under standard interfaces): There are some standard interfaces that may be useful across various D-Bus applications. org.freedesktop.DBus.Introspectable This interface has one method: org.freedesktop.DBus.Introspectable.Introspect (out STRING xml_data) Objects instances may implement Introspect which returns ...


1

I am not sure you can do this programmatically in Python. You might but it will be a huge headache to figure out how. I tried to do it before and ended up hating Dbus. Anyhow I recommend to use d-feet if you want to investigate things. Below is a screenshot that I stole from my blog. Once you know the program name, object path, etc. you can then use ...


1

Consider moving away from the antiquitated, non-Unicode-able BibTeX to the modern Biblatex, with the Unicode-aware Biber. If that isn't an option, use the Bibtexparser library. It contains code to convert from BibTeX-compliant TeX notation to Unicode, with bibtexparser.customization.convert_to_unicode. Building on the example given in the documentation: ...


1

brew install cmake --without-docs This did the trick for me. The options for building a specific brew package are shown by running brew options <package>: brew options cmake



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