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1

Note that this answer only applies to PuTTY. I too am forced to use an operating system that I would rather not, and PuTTY is the only real option due to other restrictions on the system. I was having the same issue, my screen would resize upon initiating or connecting to an existing screen session. I tried the answers here to no avail (Windows 10 with PuTTY ...


0

Now I could putty to the VM. The VM is hosted on VMware and IP addresses is supplied through DCHP. After logging into the machine I could no see the IP address. Thus gave ifdown eth0 ifup eth0 . Then tried putty again and that time it first time asked Yes/No question on finger print as I configured ssh key for root user. Then tried logging in as sudo user ...


0

Your server might be setup to disallow password authentication, e.g., requiring Kerberos (not well supported by PuTTY), or a private key. For the former, the KerberosOrLocalPasswd and UsePAM might be useful. PuTTY works (except when Kerberos is intruding) well enough with a private key. For reference: sshd_config - OpenSSH SSH daemon configuration file ...


1

The manual page is not clear, but reading the source code helps: take a look at input-keys.c, and you will see the keys, listed in a table. the table is used in the same file, in input_key near the top of the file, there's a comment: /* * This file is rather misleadingly named, it contains the code which takes a * key code and translates ...


5

The problem is your prompt: export PS1="\n[$(date +%r)] \e]0;\e[0;32m\u\e[m@\e[38;5;52m\h\e[m:\e[38;5;240m\w\e[m\e[97m$\e[m" To make bash ignore the escape sequences (which are nonprinting), you have to bracket those with \[ and \]. Otherwise, bash counts those as part of the length of your prompt on the screen, and gets confused about when the terminal ...


4

As improbable as it might seem, PuTTY does this in response to a combination of characters. PuTTY recognizes many (by no means all) of the escape sequences used for xterm, Linux console and some less familiar terminals. One of PuTTY's developers compiled a list of all of the ones that might be of interest, about 650 items. You can find copies here and ...


4

What happens is that your binary happens to contain the escape sequence for setting the window title (in xterms, it's <esc>]2, I don't know if it's different in putty).


5

It doesn't show up separately in strace because it's an in-band control. Outside PuTTY, this is often noticed as corrupting the prompt. Example: Fix terminal after displaying a binary file They're called escape sequences - commands expressed as a sequence of characters, which start with the character "escape". clear is a simple example which uses them. ...


0

Most applications stick to 16 colors (8 dark colors and 8 bright colors) known as ANSI colors, because that's the common denominator supported by almost all terminals. The ANSI standard doesn't specify the exact shade, it just says “black”, “blue”, “red”, etc. The default blue shade is often a pure blue that is hard to read on a black background on an RGB ...


1

Nope, never have been able to read blue on black (and life is far too short to fiddle with colour customizations in every terminal or console combination I might use), so I disable colors by default. With xterm, an .Xdefaults entry of: XTerm*colorMode:false does wonders; otherwise, without a means to kill the colors in the terminal, application specific ...



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