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Yes you can! But it's another path where the Putty settings are stored. Where exactly the Putty configuration is stored is system dependant, but you can use a PuTTY session name just as if you would use a hostname for ssh to use that with git, at least with the git port for windows. That way you can set the auto-login user or other session features with the ...


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If you're asking asking how to add command history to a program that doesn't support it, then use rlwrap.


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Others have stated that the "Implicit LF with CR" and Implicit CR with LF" ONLY control how PuTTY interprets what is coming IN. An IMPLICIT CR or LF wouldn't have much value down the wire. A command for an EXPLICIT CR or LF would be handy, but that doesn't seem to be available.


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When you type into a shell, the shell recognizes some characters as commands. For example, the carriage return character (the character sent by the Enter key) causes the shell to execute the command. The tab character causes the shell to perform completion. When you paste something into the PuTTY terminal window, from the shell's point of view, that's the ...


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If you have trouble saving this on the client site for some reason, you could consider setting it on the server side (assuming you have root access there) in /etc/ssh/sshd_config: TCPKeepAlive yes


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Putty settings can only be saved if assigned to a saved session. The process is usually to configure putty as you like, go back to the first Category ("session"), enter a name, and click "Save" to save your settings. If you don't want to have to load the session each time,you have to save the session as "Default Settings" in the saved sessions list.


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If you would like a more simple solution than perl script, you can use sed, anyway that perl script is simple too. echo "hello world" | sed 's/\(\t\+\)/\t/g' Anyway, using redhat 5 I don't see any problem using cat command rpm -qf $(which cat) coreutils-5.97-34.el5


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I'm not entirely sure what problem you're having - on my RHEL install, cat works if I give it tab stops. However as a more general solution perhaps: #!/usr/bin/perl use strict; use warnings; while ( <> ) { s/\s+/\t/g; print; } Will take 'input' on either STDIN (catted into) or as filenames (e.g. myscript.pl <filename>) ...



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