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14

Try using the ssh connection termination escape sequence. In the ssh session, enter ~. (tilde dot). You won't see the characters when you type them, but the session will terminate immediately. $ ~. $ Connection to me.myhost.com closed. From man 1 ssh The supported escapes (assuming the default ‘~’) are: ~. Disconnect. ~^Z Background ssh. ...


13

Mouse scrolling and elevators will work if you enable them in your .screenrc. Screen FAQ Q: My xterm scrollbar does not work with screen. A: The problem is that xterm will not allow scrolling if the alternate text buffer is selected. The standard definitions of the termcap initialize capabilities ti and te switch to and from the alternate ...


12

Figure out exactly what escape sequence your terminal sends for Ctrl+arrow by typing Ctrl+V, Ctrl+arrow in insert mode: this will insert the leading ESC character (shown as ^[ in vim) literally, followed by the rest of the escape sequence. Then tell vim about these escape sequences with something like map <ESC>[5D <C-Left> map <ESC>[5C ...


10

Try enabling keep-alives. This causes PuTTY to send SSH null packets to the remote host periodically, so that the session doesn't time out. There are other things that can cause connections to drop, but this is worth a try. If it doesn't work, you'd need to look into these other things: VPN timeouts, router timeouts, settings changes on the remote SSH ...


10

This is most likely a firewall which cuts your idle connection after a while. You can configure the openssh server or client to send a KeepAlive after a while. Send a KeepAlive every 5 minutes to the server: ssh user@server -o ServerAliveInterval=300 If you have control over the openssh-server, you can also send KeepAlives to the client after a defined ...


8

after you reattach a ctrl-a F runs the "fit" command to resize the current window. if you reattach using the -A option it should resize all windows when you reattach. Are there others still attached to the screen session when you are attaching? For instance, are you having to use -x to reattach instead of -r? you can detach others when you reattach with ...


7

According to this page you can convert your dsa keys to a format that PuTTY will accept with a PuTTY tool, PuTTY Key Generator. There is more detail on this page which describes importing your RSA or DSA key into PuTTY format. Essentially, you just select 'Import Key' from the 'Conversions' menu and navigate to where the key is stored on your machine.


7

This has nothing to do with the noai option. What you are experiencing, is a little trouble copy-pasting a load of text with existing indents to vim. What I usually do (I have this 'problem' a lot), is bind F4 to invpaste and then, before I paste stuff into vim, hit that key. It makes the problem go away. nnoremap <F4> :set invpaste paste?<CR> ...


6

Here are a few things you can try: 1) It's most likely the shell which is timing out. Disable the timeout by unsetting TMOUT in your profile. TMOUT is the number of seconds that bash waits for input before terminating. Echo $TMOUT to see if it is set. Add the following to your profile: unset TMOUT 2) Configure PuTTY to send keepalive packets by going ...


6

Most Linux distros have putty available for Linux. You could install putty on the Linux side and use puttygen to convert the .ppk files to the regular ssh style key files (called PEM files - even though they don't get a .pem in the file name). puttygen id_dsa.ppk -O private-openssh -o id_dsa NOTE: You can also use puttygen to import ssh style PEM files ...


6

OpenSSH is the de facto standard implementation of the SSH protocol. If PuTTY and OpenSSH differ, PuTTY is the one that's incompatible. If you generate a key with OpenSSH using ssh-keygen with the default options, it will work with virtually every server out there. A server that doesn't accept such a key would be antique, using a different implementation of ...


5

The path of least resistance is to tell your shell on the Solaris box what the escape sequences sent by PuTTY mean. You see a ~ because these keys emit an escape sequence like ​␛[3~ where ​␛ is the escape character (\e, ASCII 27). Type Ctrl+V followed by one of the keys so that the ​␛ character is inserted literally, followed by the other characters. Then ...


5

Your best bet is probably to look at PuTTY's Application Cursor Keys mode configuration. The default sequences send ESC as a prefix and [ followed by Append or Change or other things throwing you into insert mode. added, following Gilles A slightly more explicit version of the ^V escape can be seen with od(1). Here is me typing ^Up, ^Down, ^Right, ^Left ...


5

Use the PSCP tool from the putty download page: http://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~sgtatham/putty/download.html PSCP is the putty version of scp which is a cp (copy) over ssh command. PSCP needs to be installed on your windows computer (just downloaded, really, there's no install process). Nothing needs to be installed on the school's servers. PSCP and ...


5

The Ctrl + a + [ is meant for use within the application screen (an app for multiplexing consoles). less Generally the easiest method to do this is to use tools such as less and to pipe the output from whatever application is generating the messages on the console, and search within the application less. You can do so using the forward slash (/) followed ...


4

Another thing to check is if your system is setting the environment variable TMOUT. To check this you can just do: env | grep TMOUT or echo $TMOUT If it is set, you could change it or unset it. To change the value: export TMOUT=3600 Where the number is the number of seconds until you get logged out. Otherwise unset it to turn off the feature: unset ...


4

I think that your tty is reporting the wrong tty size. Try running pi@raspberrypi$ stty -aF /dev/ttyO0 There you will see how many rows and columns the tty thinks it has. This size should match the size set in putty. You can also change parameters, such as number of columns, using stty. The command would be something like pi@raspberrypi$ stty -F ...


4

The character it's expecting is ^?, which was a key labeled DEL on their legacy terminals (e.g. VT220). You can do stty intr ^? before starting the application to make it use this for the interrupt signal, but I don't know if there's a way to configure Putty to send it for DEL. I know some other terminals allow it to be remapped. You can't just change the ...


4

Go in through your MSTSC connection to xrdp and from within there restart your SSH daemon service. $sudo /etc/init.d/sshd restart -or- $ sudo service sshd restart If the problem continues then I'd consult the log file /var/log/secure to see if you can see if it's an authentication issue. You can consult the log file /var/log/messages to confirm that ...


4

If you are using GNU/Linux, you don't have to use Putty. That part of the tutorial is geared towards Windows users. Just set your .pem file permissions to r-- by doing chmod 400 mykey.pem then you can pass it straight to ssh : ssh -i mykey.pem user@aws-host.amazon.com


4

I'm not familiar with AutoHotKey, so if you can't find any solution there, read on. POSIX specifies the read command, which allows taking a line of input while stifling the terminal echo (that's what you see when you type) with -s. This is also a bash built-in, but you might check your system to see if it is present as a standalone. Otherwise, looking ...


3

I found Patrick's advice to be correct, although Chris's answer got me on the right track. Use quotes and then you don't need the backslash before the asterisk. scp 'SERVERNAME:/tmp/file_num\*' . scp: /tmp/file_num*.csv: No such file or directory scp 'SERVERNAME:/tmp/file_num*' . judgments_for_job_171642.csv 100% 32KB 32.0KB/s 00:00 ...


3

According to the PuTTY user manual this should be enabled by default: If you have an application which is supposed to use 256-colour mode and it isn't working, you may find you need to tell your server that your terminal supports 256 colours. On Unix, you do this by ensuring that the setting of TERM describes a 256-colour-capable terminal. You can check ...


3

plink is running non-interactively and therefore doesn't get your normal shell setup; in particular $PATH is going to be the default (typically /bin:/usr/bin:/usr/local/bin or some permutation thereof). In particular it will have neither your personal bin directory (wherever you put it) or /usr/sbin where many tools like ifconfig live.


3

It could be many things. Please provide the output of: echo $TERM echo $LS_COLORS typeset -p LS_COLORS alias ls tput setaf 1 | od -c echo "$(tput setaf 1)red$(tput sgr0)" Expected results: xterm (optional, see below) no=00:... (or similar, should not be empty) declare -x LS_COLORS="no=00:..." (ditto) alias ls='ls --color=auto' (or similar) 0000000 033 ...


3

You don't need to open tunneled ports on the firewall. You are fine opening only the SSH port. You may be getting caught by one of a few problems. The local ports may already be in use. Try using netstat to see if the port is occupied. When you connect to the tunneled port you will find it a localhost (127.0.0.1) not the remote address. Some software ...


3

When typing in a shell over an SSH connection, every character you press needs to be sent to the remote side, interpreted, and sent back to be displayed if appropriate. This involves at least set of packets to make a round trip to and from your ssh server. If your network connection has a lot of latency, this can become quite noticeable. Even if the overall ...


3

PuTTY has its own private key file format. If you want to use a key file generated by PuTTYgen, you need to convert it to the OpenSSH key format (which is the standard on Linux and other unix systems). Use the export command in PuTTYgen. You'll get a key file, often called id_rsa (or something.id_rsa if you have several keys). Copy that file to the ...


3

The intr character, has to be a character, it can't be a sequence of characters. As Random832 suggested, using screen is probably your best bet. It would then work from any terminal. screen emulates a terminal inside another terminal. By default, the terminal it emulates sends ^? on Backspace and ^[[3~ on Delete just like PuTTY, but you can change that. ...


3

You need to set the keep alive settings within PuTTY to keep your session active.              There are 2 types of keepalives that you can configure. The 1st type will keep the connection alive, by simulating fake activity within the SSH session. These types of disconnections are done by the ...



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