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20

As @Teresa-e-Junior pointed out pactl is the tool to use: First of all we might want to get the IDs of our PA sinks. On my system this is what I get: $ pactl list short sinks 0 alsa_output.pci-0000_01_00.1.hdmi-surround module-alsa-card.c s16le 6ch 44100Hz SUSPENDED 1 alsa_output.pci-0000_00_1b.0.analog-stereo module-alsa-card.c ...


14

In this case the card is always the same. What is changing between a switch and another is the "card-profile". So the solution which actually worked is: pacmd set-card-profile <cardindex> <profilename> In my case I found all the card profiles with: pacmd list-cards And after I can switch between monitor and laptop speakers with: pacmd ...


11

In PulseAudio, each sound card has a profile set associated with it. A profile set contains multiple profiles, and those are the profiles that you see when listing the cards (or when looking in the various PulseAudio GUIs). There is a default profile, which primarily contains things useful for analog sound output. There is also an extra-hdmi profile that ...


8

They are actually similar in being sound servers. JACK is designed for real-time/low-latency response, which is required by professional-level audio solutions. PulseAudio is targeted more at general desktop (where less strict needs apply). PA seems to be heavier than JACK - being more complex induces more overhead. On Linux both use ALSA for real output in ...


8

First of all we need to configure/change the audio configuration for our bluetooth device (in my case, Bose Soundlink), I wouldn't assume that this steps would work for every bluetooth device, so give it a try, and hopefully it'll work. We type in this command. sudo nano /etc/bluetooth/audio.conf This will open or if not exist previously then create the ...


7

Jack requires you-- the knowledgeable user-- to configure the server to determine lowest possible processing latency for your machine. (Processing latency is the time it takes the server to move data to/from the client applications and then send/receive the next "chunk" of audio samples outside the system.) Jack will either deliver those chunks of audio ...


7

You can use Xvfb, which is X server with a virtual framebuffer, i.e. an X server that displays only in memory and doesn't connect to any hardware. You don't need to run any client you don't want on that server, and in particular no desktop environment or window manager. Xvfb :1 -screen 0 1x1x8 & After this: DISPLAY=:1 dbus-launch DISPLAY=:1 ...


6

pactl list sinks | grep '^[[:space:]]Volume:' | \ head -n $(( $SINK + 1 )) | tail -n 1 | sed -e 's,.* \([0-9][0-9]*\)%.*,\1,' That's what I have. It's not neat, but it was enough for my use. I couldn't find the way to do it. The pactl just doesn't seem to have any means of getting listing for one sink only, but they are printed in ascending order. So ...


6

Just a guess but something like this in a file systemd/user/pulseaudio.service: [Unit] Description=PulseAudio Sound System Before=sound.target [Service] BusName=org.pulseaudio.Server ExecStart=/usr/bin/pulseaudio Restart=always [Install] WantedBy=session.target I found this in a github repo which had additional files related to systemd setup. The ...


6

Turns out alsamixer is still usable, just change the soundcard.


6

Try pavucontrol. More information here - https://help.ubuntu.com/community/SkypeTroubleshooting#Selecting%20Microphone%20%28input%20device%29 yum install pavucontrol You will have to select the right mic in the Recording tab of pavucontrol


6

I've done this in the past and have had pretty good success with boosting the volume up. The only problem with it is if you turn it down, then you'll have to come back into the system preferences under the speaker icon to turn it back up to 150%. However with the steps below should remain "sticky" from reboot to reboot. ...


5

I'm not exactly sure what you meant with "ALSA or PulseAudio", I assume you meant PulseAudio over ALSA. I'm also in the dark, in regards to your distribution, so I'm prevented from being very specific. If you provide your distro + version, I can let you know if this problem has known workarounds. GNU/Linux audio has improved, but it's not on level with ...


5

The following commands are use to manipulate the PulseAudio sound server: pacmd - Used to reconfigure a PulseAudio sound server during runtime. pactl - Used to control a running PulseAudio sound server. Here are some examples of how they function. pacmd list-sinks :: list name or index number of possible sinks pacmd set-default-sink [sinkname] :: set ...


5

According to the Realtek specification, the Microphone Acoustic Echo Cancellation (AEC), Noise Suppression (NS), and Beam Forming (BF) technology for voice applications is listed in the Software Features list. I had also look in the ALC892 chipset datasheet and it is actually not a feature of the chipset. So it is confirmed that this ...


5

I've done my share of cursing it, rightly or wrongly. Or both. I think it has gained better acceptance over time. Pulseaudio came onto the scene < 10 years ago. The reaction was a little like the reaction to systemd -- while there are a lot of good reasons for it, these were largely meaningless in many contexts, and for users who were comfortable with ...


5

To load a specific module to the PA server, you add it to /etc/pulse/default.pa: load-module module-device-manager Changes can also be made during runtime using pacmd.


5

A) Is there a way to determine the systemd unit that caused the creation of a specific process (in my example output, process 2738, the PA daemon)? Sure. You can run systemctl status <pid> and systemd will find you the unit that contains that PID. For example, on my system I find a dnsmasq process: # ps -fe | grep dnsmasq nobody 18834 1193 ...


4

This is a bug. The actual root cause is somewhat deeper: systemd's reload logic is flawed. That's why you saw it only when you had actually enabled a unit (i. e. a "disabled -> enabled" transition had taken place): in this case systemd implicitly reloads the units. I'm working on fixing the bug; in the meantime, if this manifestation (spontaneous volume ...


4

for getting a volume I'm trying this one: echo `(pactl list sinks | grep "Volume: 0:")| awk '{print $3}'`


4

The solution turned out to be simpler than it appeared. The output of fuser -v /dev/snd/* revealed jackd was silently hogging the audio card even after QjackCtl supposedly killed it. Running killall jackd fixed the problem. The problem wasn't with PulseAudio, but rather jackd running invisibly in the background.


4

To set the default device, you should not redefine the default device but simply put the following into /etc/asound.conf: defaults.pcm.card 2 # or better "PCH" defaults.pcm.device 0 This will work only for programs that actually use a default device without explicitly specifying a device. If some program like PulseAudio or VLC has been configured for ...


4

mpd doesn't accept pulseaudio input sources, so there is no direct way to route pulseaudio through mpd. However, what you want to accomplish is still possible, with the help of gstreamer and some cleverness. I accomplished this a few years ago. I wrote this program which implements the "Gstreamer Pipeline Script" component of this diagram: To sum up the ...


4

I use: cvlc --no-one-instance --volume 150 <soundfile> to play short sounds (< 1 second) as notifiers for program activities. The --no-one-instance makes sure this playing does not get scheduled after something that might be running in my 'normal' vlc (like music) and which is setup to have a single instance and for which additional invocations ...


4

try this for ffplay: ffplay -autoexit -nodisp -loglevel panic /usr/share/sounds/speech-dispatcher/test.wav


4

Remember that Alsa is not removed when installing Pulseaudio. Pulseaudio uses Alsa in quite some extent and you could say it's a layer on top of Alsa. There's pavucontrol (on Debian/Ubuntu also the package name). It allows you to do a little bit more configuration on the Pulseaudio server and Pulseaudio-managed things like Bluetooth audio profile selection. ...


4

It seems like I found a solution, at least for this particular case. Since I knew the card and device number assigned by ALSA, I just had to open /etc/pulse/default.pa. in editor and change this line #load-module module-alsa-sink into this load-module module-alsa-sink device=hw:2,7 where 2 and 7 are my particular instances of card and device numbers. ...


4

The -t option needs to come before the filename it applies to. Also, -t pulse means to read directly from (or write to) the PulseAudio daemon; it's not a file format as such. The type name for raw audio is raw. Try this: parec ... | sox -t raw -b 16 -e signed -c 2 -r 44100 - hmm.ogg ... (where ... means to keep the same arguments you had before) soxi ...


4

I finally found a solution to this, it took me a while to find so I post it here in case it might help others. Edit the file: /etc/pulse/default.pa Look for the line: load-module module-udev-detect And change it into: load-module module-udev-detect ignore_dB=1


3

From what I know you can use the softvol plugin for ALSA and set the max_dB value. Something in direction of: pcm.!default { type plug slave.pcm "softvol" } pcm.softvol { type softvol slave { pcm "hw:0,0" # pcm "dmix" or this or the like. } control { name "PreAmp" card 0 } ...



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