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14

As @Teresa-e-Junior pointed out pactl is the tool to use: First of all we might want to get the IDs of our PA sinks. On my system this is what I get: $ pactl list short sinks 0 alsa_output.pci-0000_01_00.1.hdmi-surround module-alsa-card.c s16le 6ch 44100Hz SUSPENDED 1 alsa_output.pci-0000_00_1b.0.analog-stereo module-alsa-card.c ...


7

In this case the card is always the same. What is changing between a switch and another is the "card-profile". So the solution which actually worked is: pacmd set-card-profile <cardindex> <profilename> In my case I found all the card profiles with: pacmd list-cards And after I can switch between monitor and laptop speakers with: pacmd ...


7

In PulseAudio, each sound card has a profile set associated with it. A profile set contains multiple profiles, and those are the profiles that you see when listing the cards (or when looking in the various PulseAudio GUIs). There is a default profile, which primarily contains things useful for analog sound output. There is also an extra-hdmi profile that ...


5

Try pavucontrol. More information here - https://help.ubuntu.com/community/SkypeTroubleshooting#Selecting%20Microphone%20%28input%20device%29 yum install pavucontrol You will have to select the right mic in the Recording tab of pavucontrol


5

They are actually similar in being sound servers. JACK is designed for real-time/low-latency response, which is required by professional-level audio solutions. PulseAudio is targeted more at general desktop (where less strict needs apply). PA seems to be heavier than JACK - being more complex induces more overhead. On Linux both use ALSA for real output in ...


5

I've done my share of cursing it, rightly or wrongly. Or both. I think it has gained better acceptance over time. Pulseaudio came onto the scene < 10 years ago. The reaction was a little like the reaction to systemd -- while there are a lot of good reasons for it, these were largely meaningless in many contexts, and for users who were comfortable with ...


5

To load a specific module to the PA server, you add it to /etc/pulse/default.pa: load-module module-device-manager Changes can also be made during runtime using pacmd.


4

I'm not exactly sure what you meant with "ALSA or PulseAudio", I assume you meant PulseAudio over ALSA. I'm also in the dark, in regards to your distribution, so I'm prevented from being very specific. If you provide your distro + version, I can let you know if this problem has known workarounds. GNU/Linux audio has improved, but it's not on level with ...


4

I finally found a solution to this, it took me a while to find so I post it here in case it might help others. Edit the file: /etc/pulse/default.pa Look for the line: load-module module-udev-detect And change it into: load-module module-udev-detect ignore_dB=1


4

Turns out alsamixer is still usable, just change the soundcard.


4

Just a guess but something like this in a file systemd/user/pulseaudio.service: [Unit] Description=PulseAudio Sound System Before=sound.target [Service] BusName=org.pulseaudio.Server ExecStart=/usr/bin/pulseaudio Restart=always [Install] WantedBy=session.target I found this in a github repo which had additional files related to systemd setup. The ...


4

I use: cvlc --no-one-instance --volume 150 <soundfile> to play short sounds (< 1 second) as notifiers for program activities. The --no-one-instance makes sure this playing does not get scheduled after something that might be running in my 'normal' vlc (like music) and which is setup to have a single instance and for which additional invocations ...


4

You can use Xvfb, which is X server with a virtual framebuffer, i.e. an X server that displays only in memory and doesn't connect to any hardware. You don't need to run any client you don't want on that server, and in particular no desktop environment or window manager. Xvfb :1 -screen 0 1x1x8 & After this: DISPLAY=:1 dbus-launch DISPLAY=:1 ...


3

The following commands are use to manipulate the PulseAudio sound server: pacmd - Used to reconfigure a PulseAudio sound server during runtime. pactl - Used to control a running PulseAudio sound server. Here are some examples of how they function. pacmd list-sinks :: list name or index number of possible sinks pacmd set-default-sink [sinkname] :: set ...


3

Remember that Alsa is not removed when installing Pulseaudio. Pulseaudio uses Alsa in quite some extent and you could say it's a layer on top of Alsa. There's pavucontrol (on Debian/Ubuntu also the package name). It allows you to do a little bit more configuration on the Pulseaudio server and Pulseaudio-managed things like Bluetooth audio profile selection. ...


3

I've done this in the past and have had pretty good success with boosting the volume up. The only problem with it is if you turn it down, then you'll have to come back into the system preferences under the speaker icon to turn it back up to 150%. However with the steps below should remain "sticky" from reboot to reboot. ...


3

The -t option needs to come before the filename it applies to. Also, -t pulse means to read directly from (or write to) the PulseAudio daemon; it's not a file format as such. The type name for raw audio is raw. Try this: parec ... | sox -t raw -b 16 -e signed -c 2 -r 44100 - hmm.ogg ... (where ... means to keep the same arguments you had before) soxi ...


3

If I understand correctly, you want playback on your build in sondcard and capture (microphone) from external USB device. Your external device is listed as card 2: device 0 and your build in soundcard as card 0: device 0 I think your asound.conf should look something like this: pcm.!default { playback.pcm { type hw card 0 device 0 } ...


3

To just change the default cards, replace that asound.conf with this: defaults.pcm.card 2 defaults.pcm.device 0 To be independent from changing card numbers, use the card ID instead: defaults.pcm.card PCH defaults.pcm.device 0


3

If this is a feature of the device and not just the software it came with (it's probably the former), then it has to be implemented in the kernel driver.1 It appears to me that normally, Realtek PCI sound cards actually use the Intel HDA driver with a patch to support the ALC codecs (for anyone who's interested: [src]/sound/pci/hda/patch_realtek.c). ...


2

The basis of the problem is you have to change which sound card is being used. How to do this depends on whether you are using a gui or something else. I know next to nothing about pulse audio so I can't help with directions directly for that. But if you're using KDE you can open your "K" menu -> system settings -> multimedia -> phonon -> Audio Hardware ...


2

If you install the ALSA driver for PulseAudio then it will redirect ALSA audio through PulseAudio instead of hogging the ALSA device directly.


2

PulseAudio has got a command line interface. You can read about it on the official wiki. You didn't mention witch distro You use, but with the default package manager it should be easy to search after the PulseAudio CLI package. Basically you search the command which does the job for You, then You can create an alias command in Your ~/.bash_profile or ...


2

It seems like I found a solution, at least for this particular case. Since I knew the card and device number assigned by ALSA, I just had to open /etc/pulse/default.pa. in editor and change this line #load-module module-alsa-sink into this load-module module-alsa-sink device=hw:2,7 where 2 and 7 are my particular instances of card and device numbers. ...


2

From what I know you can use the softvol plugin for ALSA and set the max_dB value. Something in direction of: pcm.!default { type plug slave.pcm "softvol" } pcm.softvol { type softvol slave { pcm "hw:0,0" # pcm "dmix" or this or the like. } control { name "PreAmp" card 0 } ...


2

These are not services, but compile options, use ./configure --enable-XXX to enable them (see ./configure --help first) Also, to alter compile options for debian based distros, consider the debian way, First use apt-get source XXX to fetch the source code, and use apt-get build-dep XXX to install dependencies, Afterwards, change the debian/control file ...


2

mpd doesn't accept pulseaudio input sources, so there is no direct way to route pulseaudio through mpd. However, what you want to accomplish is still possible, with the help of gstreamer and some cleverness. I accomplished this a few years ago. I wrote this program which implements the "Gstreamer Pipeline Script" component of this diagram: To sum up the ...


2

try this for ffplay: ffplay -autoexit -nodisp -loglevel panic /usr/share/sounds/speech-dispatcher/test.wav


2

If the USB device is listed as a sound card in the system, you may want to check man amixer and use the unmute parameter. amixer -c 1 set Master playback 100% unmute Check also the other channels (PCM etc.). The examples from the manual are: amixer -c 1 sset Line,0 80%,40% unmute cap will set the second soundcard's left line input volume to ...


2

To set the default device, you should not redefine the default device but simply put the following into /etc/asound.conf: defaults.pcm.card 2 # or better "PCH" defaults.pcm.device 0 This will work only for programs that actually use a default device without explicitly specifying a device. If some program like PulseAudio or VLC has been configured for ...



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