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8

You could try URL-encoding your password. @ should be replaced by %40. Tackling Special Characters in Proxy Passwords on Linux indicates this should work, but looking around other people seem not to get that to work (and I have no way of testing this).


8

It sounds to me like you need a socks client, or a ssh client that understand socks. -D is for ssh to be a socks server/proxy. You could use ssh under tsocks, or another SOCKS wrapper. Or use ssh's ProxyCommand in conjunction with socat or nc -X: ssh -o ProxyCommand='socat - socks:B:%h:21,socksport=1080' C To have a HTTP proxy that uses the SOCKS server ...


7

The performance problem arise when you are tunneling TCP over TCP because you have two layers doing adaptive corrections (slow start, congestion avoidance, fast restransmit see RFC2001). Not bieng aware of one another they will experience great difficulties if you have loss on the outer connection. This page describes the phenomenon in detail. edit: ...


6

Netcat is not a specialized HTTP client. Connecting through a proxy server for Netcat thus means creating a TCP connection through the server, which is why it expects a SOCKS or HTTPS proxy with the -x argument, specified by -X: -X proxy_protocol Requests that nc should use the specified protocol when talking to the proxy server. ...


5

I don't know if that's what you're looking for, but you can use ssh -D4545 domain.com to open a socks proxy tunnel at port 4545 to the desired machine from your computer. You can then set up that proxy in your application (say Firefox) and use a plugin to quickly engage and disengage the proxy settings (something like TorButton). There is one drawback ...


5

This may not be the best solution, but if you use any proxy then it will have a specific host:port so the netcat solution with still work, albeit you'll have to pick apart the proxy meta-data to make sense of it. The easiest way to do this might be to use any random anonymization proxy out there and just channel all the traffic through netcat. (I.e., set ...


5

Do you know flossmanuals.net? They've got a great manual on How to Bypass Internet Censorship (also as epub and pdf for offline use -- and note the translations, among others in Farsi). Among many tools and methods, they cover SOCKS proxies. But given a VPS somewhere, the other ways they mention should be considered, too. (For example how to use ssh to ...


5

It seems that Yast is trying to use IPv6, which probably you don't have. According to documentation for openSUSE 12.2 you can turn IPv6 off in Network Settings or manually: To enable or disable IPv6 manually, edit /etc/modprobe.d/50-ipv6.conf and restart the system. It's working in browser probably because when IPv6 fails it falls back to IPv4. In ...


5

Well, SSH forwarding is a proxy server of sorts. It works by accepting the connection on one side, then making a connection on the other side, and then forwarding data between the two. You could easily do this, too. For example, with netcat: nc -l -p 1234 ⇆ ssh user@remote 'nc remote2 80' where ⇆ represents one of the ways to set up a bidirectional pipe. ...


5

To remove an environment variable, run unset ALL_PROXY Note that an environment variable only takes effect in a program and the program it launches. If you set an environment variable in one shell window, it doesn't affect other shell windows. If you've added export ALL_PROXY=… to an initialization file, remove it from there. You can run export with no ...


4

They're in the $http_proxy, $https_proxy and $ftp_proxy environment variables. Also, $no_proxy contains a comma-separated list of host patterns for which no proxy is used. For example: http_proxy=http://proxy.example.com:3128/ no_proxy=localhost,127.0.0.1,*.example.com


4

Ok, I totally forgot about -vvv :-) Here is the output: OpenSSH_5.6p1, OpenSSL 1.0.0a 1 Jun 2010 debug1: Reading configuration data /home/echox/.ssh/config debug1: Applying options for * debug1: Reading configuration data /etc/ssh/ssh_config debug1: Applying options for * debug2: ssh_connect: needpriv 0 debug1: Executing proxy command: exec ...


4

Either export the http_proxy environment variable as in export http_proxy=http://myproxy:port or add Acquire::http::proxy "http://MYNAME:MYPASS@MY.PROXY.COM:MYPORT" To /etc/apt/apt.conf. See http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=96802


4

visit these pages, all you need is described there: http://www.cyberciti.biz/tips/howto-rhel-centos-fedora-squid-installation-configuration.html http://www.php2s.com/linux/install-configure-squid-proxy-server-on-centos-or-enterprise-linux-5-and-implement-access-control-list-to-block-website.html but if you want to have extensive understanding of all ...


4

You'll need to install and configure an actual SOCKS server on the server, such as Dante, SS5, Delegate or Srelay.


4

Both Perl and Python (and probably Ruby as well) have simple kits that you can use to quickly build simple HTTP proxies. In Perl, use HTTP::Proxy. Here's the 3-line example from the documentation. Add filters to filter, log or rewrite requests or responses; see the documentation for examples. use HTTP::Proxy; my $proxy = HTTP::Proxy->new( port => ...


4

If using ProxyCommand, you must use something like /usr/bin/nc to connect the server. For invoking your command before connect, you need to use sh -c "command list" to merge the two commands as one. Host remote.machine ProxyCommand sh -c "local_command; /usr/bin/nc %h %p" MORE: If your local_command is too complicated, you can use a script: cat ...


4

ssh has no native SOCKS client support, you need to use a ProxyCommand for that, for instance with socat: ssh -o ProxyCommand='socat - SOCKS4A:myproxy:%h:%p,socksuser=nobody' user@host Or use things like tsocks or dante's socksify to transparently use SOCKS for TCP traffic. For SOCKS5 with socat 2: ssh -o ProxyCommand='socat - ...


4

You haven't set up (or tried to use) a HTTP proxy, nor an ssh tunnel. Instead, you used port-forwarding over ssh. Forwarding TCP ports does not work for HTTP. Visiting a HTTP URL uses the domain of the URL at two different points. 1 - to find the IP address to send messages to. 2 - for the the Host header in the HTTP message. This lets one IP address ...


4

You need the ProxyCommand, see the man page. Here's an example: Host serverB HostName serverA.com User someuser ProxyCommand ssh -q serverB -W %h:%p # -W is supported by a recent OpenSSH # or for older versions or other implementations # ProxyCommand ssh -q serverB nc %h %p This allows you to type ssh serverB and you connect to serverA which then ...


4

If the ssh on the proxy side is new enough (>= OpenSSH 5.4), you can use its -W option which works similar than nc. Add to the corresponding entry in your .ssh/config file: ProxyCommand ssh -W %h:%p PROXYHOST Example: Host TARGETHOST ProxyCommand ssh -W %h:%p PROXYHOST HostName 10.0.0.1


4

Let's call the machine that has internet access hasinet and the one that doesn't noinet. If you can make an SSH connection from noinet to hasinet You can do this easily with OpenSSH's built-in SOCKS proxy. This command will set up a SOCKS proxy on noinet listening on port 1080: noinet$ ssh -D 1080 hasinet If you can only make SSH connections to noinet ...


3

You could do what the browser does, i.e. connect to the proxy, $ telnet proxy-server 3128 and talk to it. If there was no authentication, a simple GET request (followed by two newlines (Enter)) with a full hostname and protocol, e.g. GET http://www.google.com/ HTTP/1.1 should suffice. Since you need authentication, you need to provide your username ...


3

Wow, thanks for asking this question. I find it rare to see someone fully exploiting SSH and this question hits on a couple of areas. This is not a ProxyCommand issue. The ProxyCommand simply instructs the local ssh client to do something in preparation before trying to talk to the remote client. Yes, in our instance, we talk to another ssh session, but ...


3

The -D option enables a SOCKS4/5 server. It is not identical to an normal HTTP/FTP-proxy and need therefore to be interfaced differently. A lot of browser support SOCKS proxies, but usually not via a http_proxy/ftp_proxy environment variable. You can wrap programs, which do not support SOCKS directly, with tsocks. See also ...


3

Try mitmproxy. mitmproxy is an SSL-capable man-in-the-middle proxy for HTTP. It provides a console interface that allows traffic flows to be inspected and edited on the fly. mitmdump is the command-line version of mitmproxy, with the same functionality but without the user interface. Think tcpdump for HTTP. Features Intercept HTTP requests and ...


3

What you are looking for is a forwarding, non-caching, HTTP proxy server targeted for traffic optimization, which is what Opera uses on their servers. There are two open source proxies available for you to install on your own server: Ziproxy, which is already available in the repositories for some distributions. RabbIT.


2

There is no practical way to select different routes on an application-by-application or process-by-process basis. (Linux had one for a time: iptables --cmd-owner, but that disappeared in kernel 2.6.14). See Linux : restricting outgoing on an application basis. You can select different routes on a user-by-user basis with iptables --uid-owner, or select ...


2

Put this in your squid.conf httpd_accel_host virtual httpd_accel_port 80 httpd_accel_with_proxy on httpd_accel_uses_host_header on # acl lan src 192.168.1.1 192.168.2.0/24 # configure this for your lan settings http_access allow localhost http_access allow lan and make sure you have setup the iptables on your squid server. iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING ...


2

I don't know of an "out-of-the-box" solution that does this completely automatically and seamlessly. It is possible. The best I can do is provide a "high-level" summary. Basically, you are looking at a routing problem. You want traffic destined to specific subnets to travel over different gateway IP addresses. If you are willing to live without a ...



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