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In theory, a program that loses its connection to the X server could just try reconnecting until a new X server is available. In fact, I've written programs that do this. It requires extra code, because you have to re-run your GUI-initialization routine to re-create your resources (windows, bitmaps, fonts, etc) on the new X server, and refresh all your ...


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x0vncserver (in Debian and Ubuntu in the package vnc4server) may help to regain access to crashed or at least no more accessible X session, e.g. with x0vncserver display=:0. And then there is xpra which allows the user to view remote X applications on their local machine, and disconnect and reconnect from the remote machine without losing the state of the ...


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"Kill Me Softly" I just ran across project with a couple of small shell scripts for this. https://github.com/alanfranz/killmesoftly


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You could use wmctrl to gracefully close all windows of a particular application1 (as far as I know it's "as clean as if the application was closed using menu->Exit"). using app wm_class: for win in $(wmctrl -lx | awk '$3 ~ /Icedove/ {print $1}'); do wmctrl -ic "$win"; done using app pid: for win in $(wmctrl -lp | awk -v icepid=$(pgrep icedove) '$3 == ...


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SIGTERM allows a process to perform cleanup before it terminates, but whether or not the process actually does so, and what sort of cleanup it performs, depends on how the program was written and (to an extent) on the facilities that the language the program was written in provides. So when a program receives SIGTERM it's not obliged to save anything, but ...


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What you're seeing should not surprise you. You've started gedit two different ways, via two different parents, so of course the PPID — parent process ID — is different in the two cases. The first is a child of Bash, because you started it from a Bash command line. The second child's initial process will be your OS's GUI system, but because it's being ...


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Quoting Linux Device Drivers, 3rd Edition. I didn't use the Quote button, as I wanted to bold the options Except where specified otherwise, all of these options are found under the "kernel hacking" menu in whatever kernel configuration tool you prefer. Note that some of these options are not supported by all architectures. CONFIG_DEBUG_KERNEL This option ...


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First of all, I would suggest to avoid parsing output of ps when possible. Use -o do set what columns you want to display and use process selectors to filter out those you are looking for - see PROCESS SELECTION chapters in the ps(1) man page. As for the actual assignment, taskset doesn't read standard input. You probably want to use xargs: ...



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