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3

Have a look at cgroups, it should provide exactly what you need - CPU reservations (and more). I'd suggest reading controlling priority of applications using cgroups. That said, put the important yet often idle processes into group with allocated 95% of CPU and your other applications into another one with allocated 5% - you'll get (almost) all of the power ...


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@muru cpulimit looks way better I think you got mixed up with nice nice ranges at least from -20 resulting favorable scheduling through 19, least favorable. The default behavior is to increase the niceness by 10 which you did. But here is the issue: a nice should not be confused with a scheduling priority, which lets applications determine the order in ...


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Coincidence: I just came across the cpulimit command. It limits the CPU usage of a process (to a certain %, for example). An example from the manpage: # cpulimit -l 20 firefox Launch Firefox web browser and limit its CPU usage to 20%


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To quote Robert Love: The scheduler does not magically know whether a process is interactive. It requires some heuristic that is capable of accurately reflecting whether a task is I/O-bound or processor-bound. The most indicative metric is how long the task sleeps. If a task spends most of its time asleep it is I/O-bound. If a task spends more ...


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As a component of the kernel, the process scheduler, makes the decisions to divide up processor time between processes on a given system using a priority-based scheduling algorithm. Starting with an initial base or default priority of zero (I believe) the scheduler can dynamically increase or decrease priority to fulfill scheduling objectives based on ...



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