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6

Just remove the IPv4 and IPv6 addresses with ip addr flush dev eth1 and ip -6 addr flush dev eth1.


4

Source: git://git.ozlabs.org/~paulus/ppp.git Homepage: http://ppp.samba.org/ How to find it yourself next time: Find the package containing the command (on Debian and its derivatives e.g. dpkg -S /full/path/to/chat or apt-file search bin/chat) If necessary find a more detailed description of the program (e.g. apt-cache show ppp) Feed your favourite search ...


4

In all likelihood the culprit is NetworkManager -- it rebuilds /etc/resolv.conf on startup/shutdown and whenever your managed network connections change. Your best bet, unless you want to strip parts of your install out of your system, is to add your user to the netdev group (sudo adduser myuser netdev will do the trick) and then using ...


4

Somewhere in your ppp setup (probably either in /etc/ppp/options or at the command line), you have an option called connect followed by a command used to setup the modem for a connection. It's usually a chat script. You need to find out why that command is failing. If it is a chat script, you can make it verbose by changing it from chat blah blah... to chat ...


3

Take a look at the resolvconf package -- its purpose is to intercept resolv.conf changes (e.g. by DHCP clients). It can run small scripts when that happens, and it can prepend, append, or override settings written into resolv.conf Resolvconf is a framework for keeping up to date the system's information about name servers. It sets itself up as the ...


3

If that truly is just a cable adapter, with no electronics hidden underneath that black overmolding, you're not going to be able to use it to connect to the analog telephone network. USB uses its four wires for power, ground, and a differential signaling pair, all operating at 5 V DC. POTS uses its four wires as two separate phone lines, with voltages ...


3

You don't need to list any nameserver other than 127.0.0.1 in /etc/resolv.conf. What you need to inform dnsmasq of the upstream DNS server, and it will relay and cache requests to the ISP's server. If your ISP's DNS providers don't change (they rarely do), you can declare them in the Dnsmasq configuration file (/etc/dnsmasq.conf), with lines like ...


2

You will have to modify default pppd parameter (e.g place a persist parameter) , into NetworkManager 's source code , which is not guaranteed to work. However , with powerful script you could try with some shit like the following , given you have a workable pppd connection , called provider Keeping dialing until we have a default route configured: while ...


2

What I would do is to redirect the output of wvdial to a file, and separately print out “interesting” lines from the file as they appear. wvdial >wvdial.log 2>&1 Here's one way to filter the file. tail -n +1 -f means to follow the file as it grows (-f), starting with the first line (-n +1). The filter grep -v means to display all but the ...


2

If you are using ppp to connect to your isp, then pppd will run /etc/ppp/ip-pre-up after it connects, but before bringing up the network interface. Most systems also have an /etc/ip-up that gets run after the network interface is brought up, and that is usually a script that runs everything in the directory /etc/ip-up.d/. Also, most systems already have a ...


2

When you have a pppoe connection, you can do it in the /etc/network/interfaces via 'Debian' or 'Ubuntu' way like: auto eth0 iface eth0 inet ppp provider dsl-provider You can find this solution in /usr/share/doc/pppoe/README.Debian Edit: If you want to start connection manually, don't use a line auto eth0 and connection you can start by ifup eth0 ...


2

Checkout man 5 interfaces. The /etc/network/interfaces file tells bunch of scripts (debian package ifupdown) how to bring up various network interfaces. You'd find stanzas like the following in them: auto eth0 iface eth0 inet dhcp The 'auto eth0' line tells the ifupdown bunch of scripts to 'UP' the eth0 interface when asked to UP everything. The system ...


2

You can't bridge ethernet and PPP because they are different layer two protocols, and incompatible ones at that. PPP, as it's name implies is a direct point to point link. It doesn't know the concept of multiple hosts on the local link. Ethernet on the other hand can have any number (well, lots) of other hosts on the local link. Reconciling this directly ...


2

Have you ever thought about givin GNU screen a try? To be very honest i havent much experience with tmux, but screen always did the job nicely.


2

Check /etc/ppp/options. DO NOT Edit this file, rather copy it to some location and make edit. check this: # Disable Address/Control compression negotiation (use default, i.e. # address/control field disabled). #-ac More info you can find here in the PPP-HOWTO.


2

chat & pppd chat is a program that the pppd program can use to dial a modem connection. It is provided with a script of that describes the conversation required to establish the connection. (A conversation in this context is a series of commands issued by chat, and responses received from the modem.) pon & poff pon and poff are commands used to ...


2

You can refer to this wiki that explain a very simple and complete way of acheving what you want with iptables, This explain how to Nat your wifi interface behind you ppo interface. Edit 1: You can also make your two interface working as a bridge aka switch but it would probably be a bit more tricky, some info about that here


2

Possibly, your 3G provider gives you a private IP address from one of these ranges 10.0.0.0 - 10.255.255.255 172.16.0.0 - 172.31.255.255 192.168.0.0 - 192.168.255.255 In this case, you're behind ISP's NAT and can't access Pi from the internet, but you can access the internet from Pi.


1

I believe you can use the command ppstats -z to display compression statistics. If it displays all zeros then compression is not enabled. excerpt from man page -z Instead of the standard display, show statistics indicating the performance of the packet compression algorithm in use. When the -z option is specified, instead displays the ...


1

There was a bug in this particular version of the Kernel. It was patched in versoin 2.6.34. This was the ticket opened up against the Kernel: Bug 16206 - PROBLEM: PPP and other serial port related application hangs in kernel space. Either you'll need to backport the patch yourself or move up to a newer version of the Kernel.


1

The simplest way would be to assign your PPP Endpoints IP Adresses and set up OpenVPN with tap devices. To answer the new/extented question in the comment to use openvpn without encryption: The short answer is add "cipher none" to the config file disable decryption. To disable authentication, you'd add "auth none". quoted from the very first hit when ...


1

If what you really want is just to connect the notebook to your network, check if it has a PC Card or PCMCIA slot. Most notebooks, even very old ones, should have that. Then you can find a second hand PCMCIA Ethernet card for almost nothing.


1

First, PMTUd does require ICMP to be forwarded to the machine that sent the traffic. But if you allow RELATED,ESTABLISHED the required ICMP will be let through. And NAT with connection tracking will get it back to the right machine. You're likely looking for this magic iptables line, though: iptables -t mangle -I FORWARD -p tcp -o ppp0 -j TCPMSS --set-mss ...


1

If you run a decent distribution with systemd support, the easiest and technically safest way is to use a device unit. This way, systemd will be in full control of the long-running script and will even be able to properly terminate the process once the device is shutdown/removed - detaching the process means you're giving up being in full control of the ...


1

Have you configured the following pppd Link Control Protocol options? They control whether and how often pppd sends out LCP echoes to check whether the link is still alive or not, and how it responds if it isn't. lcp-echo-failure n lcp-echo-interval n lcp-echo-adaptive They combine well with the following options, which control whether pppd will try to ...


1

For anyone who might stumble upon this issue: I fixed it in my router. My computer is connected to my router, which is connected to my modem which goes ultimately to my provider. In resolv.conf I found the address of my router as the first nameserver and then the address of my modem. Since my router didn't have any nameserver tables it wouldn't give any ...


1

If you're using the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP), then it will configure your network settings automatically, which includes the address, the gateway and the nameserver, among others. When this happens, resolv.conf, or any other place for this kind of network configuration, gets changed, by design. Check your system documentation to know ...


1

Edit by OP: Ok. I found an answer on this page: http://pptpclient.sourceforge.net/routing.phtml#lan-to-lan-via-adsl This seems to be working: route add -net 192.168.0.0 netmask 255.255.0.0 dev ppp0 iptables --insert OUTPUT 1 --source 0.0.0.0/0.0.0.0 --destination 192.168.0.0/16 --jump ACCEPT --out-interface ppp0 iptables --insert INPUT 1 --source ...


1

Assuming the VPN are all up and running you would need to add an entry to the routing table that specifies over which interface send traffic to X and Y networks. How to do this may vary from one Linux distro to another, but this will give you an idea -- For example, let's assume that over ppp0 you want to reach 192.168.255.0/24 route add -net ...



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